JOHN HOLYOKE

Moose-permit lottery accepting applications

Posted March 15, 2013, at 1:35 p.m.

If you have hopes of participating in this year’s various moose-hunting seasons, it’s not too early to take the first step toward the hunt of a lifetime.

In fact, if you’re among those who still send in a paper application — most applications are completed online — your deadline is rapidly approaching: Those paper applications must be postmarked by April 1, or delivered to the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife office by 5 p.m. on April 1.

Internet entries must be completed by 11:59 p.m. on May 14.

Applicants will be vying for one of 4,155 moose permits that will be allotted at this year’s lottery. That event will be the highlight of a moose lottery festival in Greenville, and will be held on Saturday, June 15.

Here are some of the things you ought to know about this year’s moose lottery:

• Residents will again be limited to purchasing only one chance in the lottery, which will cost them $15. Nonresidents can buy one chance for $15, three for $25, six for $35, 10 for $55, or 1,000 chances for $55,000.

No, that last stat was not a typo. Nonresidents can purchase as many permits, in increments of 10, as they want. And before you complain, stop. All nonresidents are competing against other out-of-staters for their allotted 10 percent of the available permits. We Mainers get the other 90 percent. The fact that some fat cat from Kansas wants to donate money to the DIF&W doesn’t affect us Mainers a bit. So stop griping. (I’ve always wanted to say that … maybe I’m a bit overcaffeinated today)

• Once you win (And you will! Let’s be positive here!) residents will be expected to pay an additional fee of $52 for the actual moose-hunting permit. And again, before you gripe, consider this: Nonresidents will have to pay $585 for their moose permit.

See? Things aren’t as bad as you thought. Not only are the nonresidents not stealing your moose permits, they’re also paying through the snout for the (10 percent) of the permits that state law allows them.

• There are several moose season options, and since we’re being positive here, you ought to get out your date book and mark ’em off as “Tentative Vacation.”

Sept. 23-28, with 950 bull permits allotted in a total of eight Wildlife Management Districts.

Oct. 14-19, with 1,460 bull permits and 430 antlerless permits allotted in 19 WMDs.

Nov. 4-9 with 1,185 antlerless permits allotted in eight WMDs.

Nov. 4-30 (including Nov. 2 for Maine residents) with 130 any-moose permits allotted in six WMDs.

Get BDN Maine Outdoors

The fifth edition of our stand-alone publication, BDN Maine Outdoors, rolled off the presses recently, and readers should be seeing our new product at their newsstands.

This issue’s cover story focuses on creek boaters — Mainers who hunt for free-flowing rivers and navigable waterfalls, which they launch their kayaks off — and it illuminates the world of a cool group of hard-core paddlers. And you’ll find water-based tales throughout the publication.

Among the offerings:

• A guide to some of the state’s spectacular waterfalls.

• What to look for when you’re choosing a canoe or kayak.

• Fly-fishing gear tips from Don Corey of the Penobscot Fly Fishers.

• Reader-submitted stories from the Kenduskeag Stream Canoe Race.

• A list of upcoming canoe races around the state.

• A look at the life of spring peepers, those noisy frogs that scream “Maine” to many.

• Treasure-hunting for gems.

• A guide to spring bird behavior.

• An ode to mud season.

You can also find the stories online at bangordailynews.com/outdoors.

If you can’t find an edition of BDN Maine Outdoors at your local store, we’d love to hand you one when we host a booth at the State of Maine Sportsman’s Show in Augusta March 29-31.

John Holyoke may be reached at jholyoke@bangordailynews.com or 990-8214. Check out his blog at outthere.bangordailynews.com and follow him on Twitter @JohnHolyoke.

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