CORRECTED

Fort Fairfield man sentenced to five years in federal prison for possessing child porn

Posted Jan. 04, 2013, at 5:46 p.m.
Last modified Jan. 05, 2013, at 1:19 p.m.

BANGOR, Maine — A Fort Fairfield man who was found to have hundreds of images of child pornography on his computer was sentenced Friday afternoon in U.S. District Court to five years in federal prison.

Jake B. Rogeski, 25, who pleaded guilty to possession of child pornography in August, was issued no fine, but was ordered to pay a mandatory $100 special assessment. U.S. District Judge John A. Woodcock Jr. ordered that Rogeski, after serving his prison term, be required to have 10 years of supervised release. He also must register as a sex offender and not have possession of any firearms or dangerous weapons.

Rogeski cried as he hugged his family before being handcuffed and taken into federal custody.

Assistant U.S. Attorney James L. McCarthy asked Judge Woodcock to impose a 97-month sentence. Rogeski faced up to 120 months in prison for the offense.

Rogeski was charged in September 2011 with possession of child pornography. He was employed by SAD 20 to assist with its 21st Century After School program but resigned after the investigation began, according to a previous report. Students in the program receive help with their homework, are given healthful snacks and participate in other programs to help them excel academically and socially.

The defendant admitted to downloading child pornography and searching a peer-to-peer file-sharing program for child pornography using the terms “pedo boys” and others, according to the prosecution version of events. A search of Rogeski’s computer turned up more than 100 video files of child pornography, including prepubescent children. In addition, more than 400 still images of children engaged in sex acts with adults were found on his computer, according to the prosecution version of events.

Five family members and a friend said during the sentencing hearing that Rogeski was a caring man and was very active in the community.

They said he started volunteering with the Fort Fairfield Fire Department at age 16.

“He gave it his all when working as a firefighter,” said Nancy Rogeski, his mother. “He was always on call and kept his pager close by. On the weekend of his high school graduation, he stayed home to be on call for forest fires in Quebec.”

Dennis Rogeski, Jake’s brother, also testified to his character.

“He took a week off, unpaid, to help [my wife and me] move and he never asked for a cent,” said Dennis Rogeski. “He’s always been there for my wife and I.”

His mother said the good Jake Rogeski did outweighed his crime.

“He made a very costly mistake,” she said. “And he’s remorseful. He’s anxious to continue counseling. This mistake doesn’t take away his good character and doesn’t define who he is.”

Jake Rogeski cried as she spoke.

Woodcock considered the testimony in favor of the 2006 Fort Fairfield High School graduate but said he didn’t believe Rogeski was cured.

“What I am very, very concerned about is the defendant’s [sexual] interest in children,” the judge said before handing down his sentence. “Someone who searches the Internet for ‘pedo boys’ is obviously looking for sexual images of boys. I don’t accept the defendant’s assertion that he inadvertently downloaded [child pornography].

“Until you realize [that you’re sexually attracted to young children], I don’t think you’ll be able to control your actions,” Woodcock told Rogeski. The judge noted that Rogeski gave conflicting accounts of what he was sexually attracted to in presentencing evaluations.

The impact child pornography has on children can’t be ignored, Woodcock said. Some of the child pornography on Rogeski’s computer was violent in nature, he said.

“Those were the images this defendant was viewing for his pleasure,” he said.

By allowing those images to be shared on a peer-to-peer network, Rogeski “created a market” for child pornography, said Woodcock. “By that, he encouraged the abuse of other children.

“If I have any central role as a judge, it’s to protect people who can’t protect themselves,” he said.

Woodcock said he would recommend to the Bureau of Prisons that Rogeski be incarcerated in an institution where sex offender treatment is available.

BDN writers Judy Harrison and Jen Lynds contributed to this report.

CORRECTION:

An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported that U.S. District Judge John A. Woodcock Jr. said that many young children taken into foster homes are sexually abused by their caretakers. At the sentencing hearing Friday, Woodcock referred to two boys who had been sexually assaulted, photographed and videotaped in a foster home. Those images were among the images that Rogeski downloaded, the judge said, and the foster parent is accused of assaulting and photographing approximately 12 children. The BDN regrets the error.

An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported that Woodcock said Rogeski will be sent to a federal prison where there is sex offender treatment. The judge recommended to the federal Bureau of Prisons that Rogeski be incarcerated in an institution that has sex offender treatment available, but judges cannot sentence someone to a particular prison.

SEE COMMENTS →

ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business
ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business

Similar Articles

More in Aroostook