October 19, 2017
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Comments for: Park rangers rescue 19-year-old Florida hiker from atop Cadillac

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  • Guest

    duh

  • Anonymous

    I hope she is allright, and has learned a valuable lesson. I would like to think that there were hikers that may have tried to discourage her or any other unprepared hikers from making the trek.

  • Joe Niemczura

    Glad she is safe. Very poor judgement displayed. Kudos to the public safety personnel. If she went up there because it was her BF’s idea I’d say dump that guy!

    • Anonymous

      So its her boyfriends fault that she doesn’t know how to dress for the conditions?

      Last I knew she started w/ her boyfriend, but was found alone. Maybe he got a clue halfway up the trail.

  • Anonymous

    Hope she is alright ……….. that said ………………… what is it with the younger generations, snow on the ground, cold and wearing sneakers ……………….

    • Anonymous

      Probably weren’t any to begin with.
      People in Florida wear parkas when the temps get to 50.

  • Anonymous

    Send these idjits the rescue bill.

  • Anonymous

    Kudos to the scout leaders!!! Without their quick actions, there very well could have been a much different outcome for this young lady.

  • Anonymous

    And now, they’re off to snowmobile across a lake!

  • Anonymous

    Good grief. That’s why the Boy Scout motto is ‘Be Prepared’. Good advice whether you’re a Scout or not. Good job, Mr. Burgess!

    • Anonymous

      Excellent sentiment. Leave the Ugg boots and yoga pants at home and suit up!

  • Anonymous

    And…….what about the third member of their “hiking” party?

  • Henderson bobby

    I use my better judgement on high adventure scout trips . Not popular with my son sometimes.

  • Anonymous

    good job to the rangers and pilot for another successful rescue.

  • James Klowning

    Oh well at least she is presumbably ok…keep in mind that she’s 19 and from Florida. We have all done some stupid stuff at that age. She’s lucky…could have turned out a whole lot worse.

    • Anonymous

      How very true, some of the more perfect ones on here commenting should cut her a little slack.

      • Anonymous

        by 19 i was bright enough to know the difference between fashionable pretty boots and cute jeans and warm insulated winter boots and durable jeans. common sense says “see snow? snow is cold. dress in warm cloths when outside.”

    • Anonymous

      Nope, the moment you hit 18 you are a legal adult and attain the responsibilities inherent in adulthood! We’re happy she is okay, but she must be held financially accountable! Send her the bill plus interest! This costs Me the People money! Rah rah Personal Responsibility!

      • Anonymous

        Get over your self. People make mistakes. The rescue didn’t cost you a dime, I would love for you to tell us how this affected you financially?

    • Anonymous

      It was recognized an hour or so earlier that she had a problem. The boy scouts warmed her up once- gave her hot chocolate. She ignored their advice to keep moving, head down the trail and get into some dry clothes. Instead she sat down for at least an hour to watch the sunrise then waited to be carried out. Other hikers probably gave her the same advice. Our family considered going up Cadillac mountain to watch the New Year’s sunrise then decided we’d rather go another day so we did not have to deal with idiots. Reading this article, we agreed that encountering a situation like this couple would have ruined our hike. I hope the National Park Service bills her and considers charging her with reckless behavior. Unless she is uninsured or actually pays the full price one way or another, we all pay for her “medical ride”. I’m extremely disappointed that BDN is not publishing the names and towns of the helicopter ride recipients. I bet a lot of us would have enjoyed the view!

      • Anonymous

        If nothing else, maybe a brush with death (from the sounds of her positioning and location…she was close to death) will make her think before doing things.

        Doubt it…but one can hope!

  • This brings to mind the prisoner who escaped into the County woods and then sued the police for taking so long to catch him that he froze his feet.

    They say that wisdom comes with age, but that does not apply to all of us.

    — Because the older I get the more difficulty I have in understanding why people do these things.

    The humble Farmer

    • Bill Cat

      Ah, but wisdom and age don’t always run hand-in-hand.

  • Anonymous

    Send her a bill

  • Anonymous

    Here is your sign..

  • She was wearing long underwear, jeans, wool socks and furry boots.

    I sometimes wear more than that when I go to bed.

    The humble Farmer

    • Steven Scott

      Never thought that “humble” would wear Ugg boots! Guess Fox News is right…traditional America is long gone.

  • Anonymous

    It is a generation that has never done anything really, we used to hunt rabbits on snowshoes all day. Stop, build a fire and boil some tea, and all we had was wool and a good compass. This computer, cell phone generation has never really spent hours and hours outside doing things, and when they get an idea, they have not idea what to hell they are getting into.

    • Anonymous

      I was thinking the same think Pattenpond. I can remember going off for a good part of the day when only around 10 or 12 with some kind of sandwich and a book of matches. If going skating, we also took a thermos of hot chocolate too (and always burned our mouths). We would find a sheltered spot to build a fire and put down pine branches for something to sit on, and then we’d slide or skate or whatever we were doing. No one wanted to get wet feet and go home because once you were in, you were in for the day. So we kept the boots “warm” by the fire while we skated would sit and warm up when we needed to. All this without adult supervision. We learned it from older siblings or scouts, or where ever, but we were prepared. Pure and simple. Kids just don’t do these things anymore.

      • Anonymous

        Try lighting that fire today and see how fast it takes for someone to get on the cell to the fire department then the police. DHHS would be investigating your parents wondering if they’re fit for having kids after you were caught with matches lighting a fire.

        • Anonymous

          Oh, right, do not get me started on the stool pigeons of modern Maine.

        • Aldin1

          You don’t have to worry about today’s youth trying to light a fire. That ap hasn’t been created yet for their “smart” phone.

        • Anonymous

          Baloney. Pure baloney. BB84 is correct. Kids these days don’t do anything. 1. Parents are helicopter parents. God forbid they should encourage kids to do anything outside of parental supervision. 2. ELectronic age. If it doesn’t involve a cellphone, ipad, ipod, or xbox, it is of no interest to most kids. 3. Energy. ANything that requires energy is BAD. That’s why if you interview 100 kids, 99 of them will tell you they don’t ride bikes, they’ve never built a tree fort, they’ve never hiked in the woods anywhere near their home, even if they have woods in their own backyard.
          4. Intelligence. THese days, we encourage kids to be stupid. If they have trouble in school, we by law let them do less and grade them equivalently, at home, most parents NEVER require kids to assist in chores, most kids sleep in past noontime every weekend.
          THe day will come when only the strong will survive.

  • Ben Hutchins

    Isn’t that the mountain there’s a parking lot and gift shop at the top of?

    • Anonymous

      I was thinking the same thing. Why hike it when you can drive? Unless the roads are closed for the winter which could be the case.

      • Anonymous

        They may be looking for volunteers to plow the steep, winding road along the mountain cliffs to the summit…. Are you offering? LOL
        The road is closed for the winter, as is much of the park loop road, and with all the snow we just got, I’m sure that they are impassable.

      • Anonymous

        road is closed in the winter. I’ve hiked it Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring. Much more rewarding than driving. Of course, I’ve also hiked up Mt Washington (summer, soon to do it in the winter) despite the road and cog railway. Too bad it is a zoo when you get to the top. It would be much nicer with no road.

  • Anonymous

    She is very fortunate that there were others there that were prepared and that knew what to do, otherwise she would be being buried now. I always tell city people that mother nature is a sweet old girl. She has far less rules to follow than in the city. You should have adequate food as you need it, adequate water as needed, adequate clothing as needed, adequate shelter as needed, and try not to hurt yourself. Of course if you break any of her rules, she just may kill you.

  • Bill Cat

    Hmm, rescued a 19 y/o FL woman from the top of a Cadillac. Oh wait, FL, 19 and natural blond, right?

  • DavidinMaine

    Good thing there were other people around that knew what to do. Did the tourist think we plow the trails in all of our state/national parks? I wonder if she was blonde. :)

  • dk869

    A LOT of thanks needs to be extended to 3 others not mentioned in this article that stopped and provided considerable assistance to these folks. Thanks also to the numerous others that offered help. Also considerable thanks to the park rangers and the pilots of the helicopter who had to contend with the windy conditions at the top of the mountain. As for drunks and “idjits”, I didn’t see any? As for the hikers that had to be rescued, I really admire them for undertaking this trek to enjoy this wonderful experience. Not many folks from Maine, much less from Florida would ever think about getting out of bed to do such a thing, and subsequently will never know what they are missing out on. I hope for these folks, the rest of their stay in Maine turns out much better.

    • Anonymous

      Sounds like you were there, so kudos to you too for doing the right thing and helping out. It is great that they were attempting to enjoy the mountain and her natural beauty, but this young lady was fortunate that it happened on a day that draws many so that there were people able to offer assistance.

    • Anonymous

      So from the sounds of it…a LOT of people went out of their way to take care of this girl yet she continued to ignore people’s advice until she became completely immobile from hypothermia and had to rely on other people to survive?

      • dk869

        No. They were advised once to head down the mountain but I believe by that point, she was already at the point where she didn’t have it in her to go any further, and she had too much pride to admit it. It was about 20 – 30 minutes later when we crossed paths again that it became clear just how much trouble she was in. This is not an unusual situation! This type of thing happens to many people every year in this state, even those that are well prepared and have lived here all their lives. Whether your on a hike, working in the woods, hunting or fishing, its easy to work up a sweat, and then stop for a few minutes just long enough for your sweaty cloths to start freezing. Once your cloths start freezing, its really tough to warm up after that, especially your hands and feet. The only difference about this situation is she just happened to be in a place where there were other people around to help her.

  • Jess

    Wow, some of you really have nothing better to do up there in Maine than make nasty comments. The girl and guy (there was no third person) are my close friends. Neither is an “idjit” nor was drunk. Simply put, they thought they were dressed warmly enough. Not being used to such conditions certainly left them ill-prepared and they are incredibly lucky that knowledgeable, helpful people were nearby. She is 100% ok now and they both have learned from the experience.

  • Anonymous

    She should feel extremely lucky.

    She might have fallen off the fiscal cliff.

  • Anonymous

    “Curled up on a rock in a fetal position”…for a moment I thought I was re-reading Into Thin Air.

  • Anonymous

    Oh Come on you guys..How many Mainers go to Florida each year and get terrible sunburns?Maybe she was special needs person? Or a republican! Not everyone is outdoor savvy!

  • Lord Whiteman

    Glad they are ok. Winter can be deadly if you don’t take care.

  • Anonymous

    Going to Florida for a week starting tomorrow. If I am numb enough to not use sun screen, I don’t expect Floridians to pay my hospital stay. In this age of electronic, instant information there is no excuse for a lack of preparation.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t forget to wear shorts and walk around the swamps without shoes. i’m sure that all the nasty critters won’t bite you.
      Have a nice trip. And I am sure that yours will be a much better and safer one than the young women at the park.

  • Anonymous

    Not knowing how to dress to venture outside in Maine says alot. Oh yea and the ice is not safe either! Sort of like the warnings labels on most products—really?????

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