September 23, 2017
Contributors Latest News | Poll Questions | Stephen King | Hurricane Maria | Aaron Hernandez

Comments for: When will coyote hunters know they’ve killed enough?

Guidelines for posting on bangordailynews.com

The Bangor Daily News and the Bangor Publishing Co. encourage comments about stories, but you must follow our terms of service.

  1. Keep it civil and stay on topic
  2. No vulgarity, racial slurs, name-calling or personal attacks.
  3. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked.
The primary rule here is pretty simple: Treat others with the same respect you'd want for yourself. Here are some guidelines (see more):

  • Anonymous

    Heartfelt remarks from the author.
    Clearly the author is sensitive to the “right to exist” of this wily predator.

    Time to reintroduce wolves , as they are the natural enemy of coyotes.
    Restore the “balance” , that type of thing.
    Maybe that will help with the danger and damage from too many deer.

    It is against the law to tamper with another persons traps.
    It would be nice to know more of the authors background.

    • Dr. Cowboy

      We don’t need wolves in the state. They are already here but in rare numbers and are illegal to hunt, If you want to ruin what’s left of our great outdoor life, just re-introduce the wolf.

    • Joel Cat Cannon

      OOOOOh! I wonder what my lawyer friend would say about accedentally stepping into one? Ill get back to yall in a bit.

  • Guest

    Ah, there are so many coyotes in the woods behind me one hunter wouldn’t make a dent in the population.
    That being said, trapping animals is disgusting.

  • Tom Brown III

    the submission pool for op-ed pieces must have been low this week.

  • Dana Andrews

    I think a little bit of research and actual facts would make this article a bit less terrible. Asking whether he is allowed to spring a trap or follow a hunter and then scare away the potential harvest…. why not look it up and then put it in the article? Also statements like “We who defend our wildlife have compiled countless charts showing the importance of predatory animals in wilderness regions” could perhaps be followed up with either a) a chart, b) a link to a chart or c) a summarization of a chart. I didn’t read this article to hear about someone’s feelings about a coyote.
    As for me, I am not a coyote hunter, but I say go for it. I live in an area where there are tons of coyotes and few that hunt them (as successfully as the writer describes.. piles of kills or whatever). And for the record, most hunters that put out bait probably end up feeding more coyotes than they kill.

    • The charts have been presented at nearly every opportunity. Those who’s only interest is to kill things have no time for facts if those facts would get in the way of their blood-lust.

      • Dana Andrews

        sorry if you misunderstood the tone of my comment, but I was merely stating that if you are going to write a newspaper article that is meant to educate readers about your opinion or what you know for fact, maybe give them hard evidence. I haven’t gone out researching in the extent this guy seems to have (either because I am not that interested or didn’t have the time). But if there was a link or something I would have checked it out and maybe changed my opinion. (Basically, don’t assume the audience has already completely made up its mind about the issue)

        • Dr. Cowboy

          This was suppose to be an opinion, like touchy feely stuff. Not anything dealing in actual facts.

        • Anonymous

          Dana, the research for truth is exausting, as groups exist soley to fund studies that will align with their goals. An internet search will overload you with links/refrences to these groups, making the finding online of any science that does not align with their goals difficult to locate. But they exist, and are plentifull.
          That being said, I have found it to be unproductive to try and change someones opinion, such as this author, that is so deeply intrenched and on an emotional mission with facts.
          OK Daryl D, your turn.

          • Dana Andrews

            an emotional mission with facts… that he is withholding? why? i would be interested in reading what this guy is referencing but am not about to go research it (like you said, too many conflicting/unreliable sources is what I anticipate finding). But my mind could be changed. Honestly. Yet, still I have not seen any links

          • Anonymous

            I’m sorry that was not very clear. I mean that facts matter little to someone on an emotional issue/campaign.

          • Stop the emotion gig; another talking point memo.

          • Cecil Gray

            Nothing stirs the emotion Kurt more than challenging a man who puts his dogs on a bear using doughnuts.

          • Anonymous

            You must be confused Cecil, this is about our coyotes

          • Same sea different ship and you know it. The Maine Sportsman and Woman are a vanishing breed, given the embarrassing testimony here vilifying the damn coyote. It’s as transparent as ice on Moosehead.

          • Anonymous

            No cecil, it’s not the same. The main poster here (Jami) is aware of the science refuting the talking points we constantly hear, yet disreguards or talks around them. The animal rights industry has grown more so every day.How many millions of $ are collected by emotional campaigns, Where does that $ go? How is it used?”Science” is now bought and sold.

            I studied this issue as the result of the loss of our northern herd, and the ensueing economic losses suffered by my area.

            I learned the uselessness of these disscusions long ago, but am still drawn in on occasion. In real time, I am involved in the ACCA, addressing the issues our deer face, from habitat to predation. We plant food plots, ceder/hemlock stands, assist those that properly supplemental feed, as well as run a coyote control program.
            All membership money goes in the ground, Many programs we started are being emulated through out the state. We see results through our work, real ones, not useless theories.
            I’m done now

          • I hope you are done with the animal rights stuff. It is where you guys go every time no matter the discussion, no matter the qualified assessments that refute your “argument”. It’s just like Smith said before the bear referendum; we need to villify the bear and use emotion to scare Southern Mainers into thinking their safety will be in jeopardy if the referendum passes. As far as food plots go the extra deer numbers will draw equivalent deer “predators”, be they animals be they man.

          • He may be speaking of bears, but unfortunately the practices dont differ much. It has become a wonderfully legal sport to institute canned hunting involving coyotes and red foxes in many states in this country. They live trap coyotes, put them in an acre(and thats being generous to most of them) enclosure…they then set a pack of dogs on them where the animals have no means of escape or places to hide…After the coyote gives the dogs several cutoff signals and signs of submission, the dogs are then cheered to rip the animal into peices…Very sportsmanlike no? If that doesnt insight the dogs to go into a frenzy…the person in charge will shoot the coyote in the leg and make it bleed to hopefully encourage the dogs to do more damage…..This sport is also legal…And anyone that doesnt think so, has no right to call themselves human. (more information can be found researching banlivebaitdogtraining if you question the truth of it)…No animal, regardless of its stereotype, should be subjected to such cruelty.

      • Anonymous

        Ah, don’t have a clue there, do you Kathy! You can sit for hours/days and never even see a coyote! And that, my dear IS A FACT!

        ‘Blood-lust’! Yea right! If we really had blood-lust we would be hunting tourists – they are MUCH dumber than coyotes!

        • Cecil Gray

          Numb and number.

          • Anonymous

            Numbest!

          • Anonymous

            Pot, kettle, black.

          • Anonymous

            Dumb, Dumber, Dumbest! You and Cecil must be related!

        • Anonymous

          They don’t run nearly as fast either! LOL

        • Anonymous

          Fact? Your truth or the rest of the worlds?

  • Guest

    Queenie42

  • Anonymous

    My heart is with the wild ones. They are closer to God.

    • Dr. Cowboy

      What makes them closer to God?

  • Anonymous

    Never going to get rid of them, might as well make use of them. A fun and challenging hunt at times.

    • Anonymous

      I hunt, and when I hunt, I plan on eating what I kill. Otherwise, self-protection excepted, what is the point? Killing another sentient being for the fun of it should make anyone wonder shouldn’t it?

      • Anonymous

        Nothing wrong with it what so ever. Humans are a higher order than animals, we manage our ecosystems, change things to suit our needs. We decide what stays and what goes based on what society wants to protect. As long as it is legal I will continue to hunt predators, fowl, and big game. You say you hunt, you know as well as anyone then that it’s not just the fun of it alone but a culmination of all the aspects that make the experience. You can say that there is no”fun” in the hunt, but you wouldn’t be doing it if there wasn’t some enjoyment in it. Humans are a higher order and that’s how it is, we can do what we will as long as it is acceptable within our society and social norms. That’s how it is.

        • Anonymous

          just because it’s “acceptable” in our society doesn’t necessary make it right. I don’t necessarily agree that it is wrong, but if everyone kills them for sport and it goes on too much too long, we could wipe them out, there is a natural order of things, which also means, they are there for a reason too, and that reason is not for us to kill them.

          • Anonymous

            It’s obvious you have never hunted coyotes! Try it and tell us how ‘easy’ it is!

          • Anonymous

            Where in my.post did.I say it was easy

          • Anonymous

            “but if everyone kills them for sport and it goes on too much too long, we could wipe them out,”
            Impossible! Not enough ‘everyones’ are doing it to EVER wipe them out!

          • pbmann

            You have to be smarter than the coyote and from your posts I know who the smarter animal is.

          • Anonymous

            Step out on my back porch – point gun at first set of trees in the back 40 – BINGO.
            Sweet Pea just because you happen to not be able to hunt them doesn’t mean others can’t.

          • Anonymous

            That’s where being a higher order comes in handy we can actively manage populations to try and put checks on population. No organism has worth unless we determine it has worth. If coyotes are ever in danger of being wiped out (as unlikely as that situation is) there is now greater value on their existence due to the fact that there are people out there that see them not as vermin but as a sport animal.

          • Anonymous

            Man has been trying to eradicate coyotes for 200 years. 200 years from now the numb ones will still be trying.

          • Anonymous

            I don’t recall any of us who hunt trying to erradicate coyotes. they are a necessary predator that keeps the world from being over run with rodents (thier primary food source). but at least say we are trying to keep a balance in the order of wildlife that HUMANS put out of balance. I have them in my “back 40” all the time, i am not trying to erradicate them, even though coyotes and foxes have killed my livestock (chickens). So maybe you need to move and live with Ms Quimby.

        • If what you say were true, and humanity was a higher order than other beings(which I do not necessarily find much truth in), then is it not our duty, to preserve, protect, and respect those that we supposedly have this “power” over? To hunt a predator, purely for entertainment is barbaric. If we are so much “better” than these creatures, why are we showing ourselves to be beneath them in compassion, empathy, respect, and everything that we claim makes us better by being human? I find no disprespect or loathing towards a hunter that kills an animal that is consumed for food or to protect a loved one when times call for lethal necessity. However, to torture, maim, and show such a blatant disrespect for our native wildlife that helps keep a balance to our ecosystems and bring richness and diversity to our landscapes is truly loathsome. The claims that hunting coyotes helps cull their populations has also been proven completely false. Through unique abilities in compensatory rebound, excess hunting and current methods of predator control, actually result in larger numbers of the coyote population…NOT LESS. So, the only reason a hunter truly has to kill these animals is for pure enjoyment. When that is the case, it is obvious that that person can no longer admit themselves into the ranks of what society deems to be humanity. As far as us managing our own ecosystems?…That is honestly quite laughable. Yes, society and the government do manage our ecosystems…which is why they are failing in just about every aspect instead of being rich and full of life, usable resources, etc. We, as the higher order, are effectively destroying anyything of value we could have had instead of simply showing a bit of respect for our wildlife and environment.

          • Anonymous

            You take my meaning of higher order to mean we as a race are benevolent beings which we all know is not the case looking at the history of the world. My meaning is that we are the top of the chain and have abilities greater than those lower than us as we can make the choices and change things to suit our wants and needs, where as others can not.

          • Anonymous

            “My meaning is that we are the top of the chain”

            Tell that to a shark or a cougar while they are munching on your leg. Oh, the arrogance of small-minded humans.

          • Anonymous

            Humans aren’t aquatic beings as much as some would like to be. But if we aren’t the top than you might want to tell that to all the shark species that are in decline due to over fishing, and all the cougars that became extirpated from their native ranges due to our ability to remove them because at that point in time they had no intrinsic value. Obviously no one individual is invincible but as a race we are far more than the average bear.

          • Indeed. We are at the top of the food chain. That, however, will not last once our lands our depleted of natural resources. The presence of predators not only affects prey populations, but the plants, the surrounding landscape, etc. Without them(as proof shows before wolves were reintroduced to yellowstone)…The environment cannot sustain itselt without predators to fill the appropriate niche. As wolves will never be introduced back to the East coast, it is our responsibility to preserve the habitats for future use by allowing coyotes to take the role as “top predator”..And to educate society on their importance, value, and ways to coexist instead of slaughtering them in the hundreds. Doing so only increases their population, causing more conflicts between people and wildlife. If we were so much better than coyotes, we would have eradicated them by now. fortunately, humans have basically no understanding of the adaptability of the coyote..and they continue to flourish regardless of the $1.6 billion of tax payer’s dollars that have went to their slaughter since 1960. Leaving them alone, and allowing their numbers to level off naturally, is the only proven method of “control”…By continuing slaughter, hunters/trappers of coyotes, are effectively making it more dangerous and difficult for people to coexist with wildlife by increasing the coyote presence and liklihood of confrontation.

          • You don’t find much truth in the fact that humanity is higher than other beings? Then if humanity is equal or lower than other beings why don’t the raccoons and the deer and the fish and all the animals have there own government and form there own rules and make it illegal for us to kill them, oh yeah because they are ANIMALS. And you say that the more coyotes you kill, the more there are left alive? That totally makes sense too.

          • As I have said, with the thoughts that we have a higher existence than the animals..that should mean we have a duty to respect and preserve what this country has to offer….And yes, there will be more left alive. It may not make sense to you, but you are welcome to do some reading on scientific data that proves correct. Look up coyotes and compensatory rebound on google. you will find more than enough information dedicated to the subject. When you kill off a pack of coyotes that normally have 2-6 pups with maybe..maybe 2 surviving their first 2 years…with their deaths by hunting/predator control…The prey availability increases, coyotes will have larger litters the next year, and then more of them will survive..inhancing the coyote population. It makes perfect sense if you consider that a hundred years ago they were only west of the Mississipi. It is because of us, our over hunting and attempts at control, that has brought them to inhabit the east coast. As for having abilities greater than those “lower” than us…how do you suppose that is true? Many species of animals form their own “governments” through social heirarchy..It is not something that exists only in humans. There are several species of animals that have very similar abilities to our own(methods of communication, methods of governence, capacity for emotion/empathy, fight for self preservation, etc)…We are above them why? Because we can form a complex government that controls our moralities, our freedoms, and our basic human rights? Because we can go to war to defend our freedoms and animals cannot?….The fact that we are on the top of the food chain means responsibility. Something many people are now lacking due to conforming to what is okay to do within reason of the law..instead of what is right to do in accordance with our responsibilities as human beings.

          • Anonymous

            Don’t let little things like SCIENCE get int he way, Jami! Don’t worry yourself about ‘carrying capacity’ or ‘balance’. After all, America would look great as a deforested wasteland due to over-grazing! Just look at most of Africa!

            Emotion is fine, but it should never trump science! We understand that some of us are content to be at the top of the evolutionary ladder, and some of you prefer to be much lower down.

          • And you will only continue to be content at the top of the evolutionary ladder until every resource is depleted..Then you will be slumped at the bottm of the ladder like the rest of us “lower down” in a deforested wasteland as you put it…Interesting how in those places depleted of their resources..no one is above anyone..Because they are all starving, desperate to find a way out as the animals(the horribly “lower” beasts) are the only ones finding food and a way to survive. But yes..We are at the top…But that is always a temporary position. History shows us that.

          • Anonymous

            Sorry, I’m not holding my breath waiting for the end of the world to come like you are! You assume I use more than anyone else! You are mistaken, but then you are mistaken by a lot of things! I will NEVER be “slumped at the bottom” with the rest of you slugs for one simple reason (that other hunters understand) – I CAN TAKE CARE OF MYSELF! I don’t rely on others to feed, cloth or house me!
            You don’t like hunting – fine! Unless you survive by sucking on rocks, you kill SOMETHING to survive. So cut the fake indignation!

            In some circles, you would be called a wacko, but here, on BDN, you fit right in!

          • Interesting thoughts. I don’t see anywhere where I slandered hunters that kill for food. I myself, am well aware of what I consume. I have never found issue with any person that takes from nature and uses it for their survival. I have quite a lot of respect for deer hunters that eat what they kill. What I lack respect for, are people that kill something just to kill it. There is rarely a justifiable reason behind it. I have faked no indignation. I like meat..I am aware of where it comes from. I am actually quite adept at feeding and clothing myself(you are hardly the only one..and hunters aren’t the only survivalists)…As far as people calling me a “wacko”…A term that usually signifies a lack of intelligence for finding appropriate terminology…I hardly find offense. Rather, I find it amusing, that I..Someone well educated, who has respect for nature and the environment, and that is quite knowledgeable on these subjects…Is the one considered a “wacko”. It is sad actually, that those considered “normal” by your standards are people that really know little about what they are killing. If they knew truth and fact, they would likely have a different opinion. But I suppose it is true…Ignorance must be bliss. Furthermore, name calling? Really? Have we not grown up yet to full maturity? Usually, to make an appropriate argument, one must keep in mind that they are speaking amongst adults(some well educated, others at least matured)..It really does no good to slader anyone with personal attacks. It lacks professionalism. I would also ask, that before responding to my posts, that you please read them in their entirety, so that when you have a rebuttal, you are actually aware of what I have said instead of making false accusations and saying I said things I did not. Have a splendid day!

          • Anonymous

            WELL! You must feel much lighter after getting rid of that load! I’ll have a splendid day tomorrow, when I can get out in this beautiful snow and track my next quarry! Until them I’m still laughing at the ridiculous assertions you made in previous posts!

            I notice you still haven’t backed up anything you said with facts! Just more opinion! You seem to be full of it – opinions that is!

        • Cecil Gray

          Higher order? Might get some worthy argument on that one.

          • Dr. Cowboy

            Tim Treadwell used to argue that one. He ain’t around to argue anymore.

          • Anonymous

            MOST of us are Cecil, but not ALL of us!

          • Cecil Gray

            Deep Abby.

          • Anonymous

            WOW! Two whole words!

          • Deeper?

        • Anonymous

          “Humans are a higher order than animals, we manage our ecosystems, change things to suit our needs….”

          … and global warming is a hoax. You, sir, are the problem.

          • Anonymous

            I never said global warming was a hoax, the global climate is indeed changing and those changes have far reaching consequences that will be felt by the future generations. The thing is humans will adapt to survive any global catastrophe short of the end of all things.

          • Anonymous

            oh change the words around global warming to global climate, still the same thing, when all you global warming followers can predict the weather next month to please let everyone know, you can’t tell us what the weather will be next week or tomorrow for that matter, weather folks get it right now and then but not too often.

          • Anonymous

            I’m not an extremist, I don’t think the world is going to become inhospitable, or the seas will rise and we’ll all drown. But to look at historical data on even something so simple as the snow pack in the last 50 years, and tell me that something hasn’t changed. Used to be so much more snow in Maine than we’ve typically gotten in the past ten years. Maybe you should educate yourself in some chemistry and the gases in the atmosphere and have some understanding about what you are purporting to be nothing but a hoax. I believe that humans have a direct effect on the climate, I don’t believe that it is a world ending effect, but the effects will result in changes to the world. Of which some people will be more greatly affected than others.

          • Anonymous

            No, it’s pretty much YOU!

      • Dr. Cowboy

        Never really heard of anyone eating a Coyote. How do they taste…other than like any other dog?

    • Scott Harriman

      How do they taste?

      • Anonymous

        I’ve never eaten one, but bobcat and beaver are pretty good. I’d bet there is probably a broiling or crock pot recipe out there somewhere. Even a merganser can taste good if it’s cooked right.

        • Scott Harriman

          What is the point of killing something if you are not going to eat it and it is not threatening you?

          • Anonymous

            Because it is an activity that is perfectly legal and as long as it is legal to do so I will participate. It is not for everyone, not everyone has the stomach to hunt. I enjoy it, I’m not even that good at it really but I continually go out and spend all day looking for tracks and likely spots, watch the hawks and birds when nothing comes out, maybe snag a rabbit on my way out. When you finally bag one it’s great, but more often than not you are just sitting in the cold being in the woods. There is no singular aspect of it that alone would make it something I do, without the whole experience I wouldn’t hunt. I don’t know how guys go out and pay to sit in a high fence on a guarantee, I see no enjoyment in it. I like to hunt and this is a way for me to continue to do it when the more popular game animals are out of season.

          • Dr. Cowboy

            And they made snazzy hats and mitts. No different from killing a cow or some other animal for use.

          • Anonymous

            If we have to explain it, you wouldn’t understand it!
            That logic work for mosquitoes too?

          • Well, I am sure that logic would work with mosquitos..If they weren’t a threat. Mosquitos harbor diseases like Malaria and West Nile Virus, which kill millions of people each year. Killing mosquitos and actively controlling populations is in a direct attempt to preserve human life. So effectively, Scott’s comment still rings true.

          • Anonymous

            So controlling one species you don’t like is fine, but controlling another you happen to like (even thought you know little about them – other than they are fuzzy) is horrid! Okay, now we see your lack of rational thought!

            Control is control! Without it, things become unbalanced! Judging from your posts, you should understand being unbalanced!

          • Who said anything about not liking a species? I have no issue with mosquitos to be honest. However, coyotes are not a direct threat to human survival(as mosquitos are)..so what reason would their be to “control” them. It is plainly obvious that you are either misreading or misinterpreting most of my posts and answering them quite rudely to be honest. I think you may have some growing up to do as it is becomming plainly obvious you lack certain etiquette necessary to participate in adult conversations/arguments.

          • Anonymous

            Blah blah blah! You sure offend easily! If you want adult conversation, try being factual! Otherwise you are nothing more than another misguided BDN regular!

          • Anonymous

            “Otherwise you are nothing more than another misguided BDN regular!”

            Pot, kettle, black.

          • Anonymous

            yet your all offended cause someone ate dog meat — hmmmmm

          • Scott Harriman

            Every mosquito I’ve killed was trying to eat me.

          • Anonymous

            to protect the deer herd

          • Scott Harriman

            Nature can take care of herself.

            Besides, killing predators (coyotes, foxes, etc.) only increases their population, due to the survivors having larger litters to fill in the population gaps.

  • raven

    Our state’s insistance that coyoties are an issue is an issue in itself. They are not over killing deer, they are simply competing with the inflow of cash that hunters bring into the economy. We allow nature to take it’s course and we no longer need sport hunting. I know many cases where IFW has denied and downright informed thier employees to deny existence of certian species as it would be economically damaging to hunting and development. According to IFW, cougars and wolves do not exist in this state. As a wildlife biologist, I can tell you they do exist.

  • Anonymous

    Okay Joshua, since you asked:
    Yes, my family is a coyote killing machine!
    We are VERY good at it!
    Yes, we have the right to do it!
    Who gave us the right? The State!
    Who makes the rules? The State!
    How do we know who wins? Well, the one bleeding usually is the loser!
    Do we play any other games that involve killing somebody? Um, coyotes aren’t ‘somebody’ Josh, in case you hadn’t noticed. Besides, we leave those kinds of games to people who don’t hunt! We don’t have to pretend!
    I would have to say the whitetail deer is my favorite animal, and yes, I kill and eat them! Barbaric, isn’t it!
    How can you help me stop hunting? YOU CAN’T, so don’t even try!
    If all that makes you ‘angry’, tough!

    “Does it really seem far-fetched that every single coyote in this state is an animal I love and want to defend?” NOT AT ALL! Hunters have to deal with your kind of wackos all the time! We’re used to it. We usually laugh at it! You do know harassing hunters is a crime, right Josh?

    You see Josh, we all draw the line somewhere. I eat animals. Maybe you don’t. You drew a line lower than me, that’s all. Unless you survive by sucking on rocks, you too killed something in order to eat it. Besides, if God didn’t want us eating animals, then why did he make them out of meat?

    So you pray to the air and the earth, and you let me know how that works out for ya’. (See how silly you sound!) The next time you’re walking in the woods be sure to hug a coyote for me. The next time you see it, I might be wearing it!

    • Scott Harriman

      I assume they taste good, but is there really enough meat on a coyote to make it worth it?

      • Anonymous

        Don’t know, never ate one & don’t want to! (Although I understand they taste a lot like dog, but we would have to check with obama on that!)
        I don’t kill them for the meat, I kill them to keep them from killing everything they can! I do skin them and use their hides! I also take blood and tissue samples for two different university laboratories that are actively studying them!

        • Oh here comes Obama the Kenyan born socialist communist deer murderer.

          • Anonymous

            He’s the only person I know that has admitted to any experience eating dog! You have something you want to admit here, Cecil? You have experience eating dog?

          • In many parts of the world people eat dog just like you eat cow.

          • Anonymous

            Oh save it – people in other countries eat dogs daily.

          • Anonymous

            You don’t know many people then do you?

  • Anonymous

    “When will coyote hunters know they’ve killed enough?”

    When hunters stop finding the ripped apart carcasses and entrails of deer in the woods. I myself have not only found carcasses but have also heard the fight and feeding frenzy of a pack at the kill. There wasn’t much left.

    ps. Practically everything the author submits as harassment of a hunter is expressly forbidden by Maine law and game management rules. Also, a hunter knows that he can become the hunted at any time, so if you want to play, be sure you prepare yourself thoroughly.

    • Anonymous

      Well said! Obviously Josh has no problem with deer, even young fawns, being eaten alive!
      I can hear him now, “But that’s nature’s way!”
      It’s also natures way for us to hunt them!

      Some people like being on top of the evolutionary ladder, and some don’t!

      • Anonymous

        Natures way is for the strongest and smartest to survive at the expense of the weakest or sick. I would bet the author does not truly believe this.

        • Anonymous

          Not always! I have seen, with my own eyes, coyotes pull a half-born fawn from it’s mother! It happened on MY PROPERTY! Don’t even try to tell me that fawn was weak or sick! It never had time to be weak or sick! It never had time to be born before it was ripped out, and ripped up by coyotes!

          Everything has it’s own predator! Coyotes have US! Trust me, the ones we are able to kill are the dumb ones, the ones that make mistakes! The smart ones, the ones that pass on their genes, we never see!

          • Anonymous

            “Don’t even try to tell me that fawn was weak or sick!”

            Babies of any species are weak by definition, otherwise they wouldn’t be babies.

            I’m sorry that nature, in all it’s glory, upsets your delicate sensibilities, but that has been the way since before humans were here and it will be the way long after humans have rendered the planet incapable of supporting us – which is brought even closer by the elimination of predator species.

          • Anonymous

            It’s also natures way for man to kill things! We are just much better at it, and THAT is what bunches your panties!

            It doesn’t upset my sensibilities at all! I see it every spring! I bet you any amount of money that those whining about the poor, defenseless coyotes have NEVER watched it, OR HAD TO LISTEN TO IT! I Doubt YOU have, either!

            Fawns are certainly NOT weak! They hit the ground almost walking! They are lot tougher than YOU were at that age, and they deserve a sporting chance at life!

            But arguing with someone who thinks the world is going to end because of us is useless and futile!

          • Cecil Gray

            I have seen many that never saw me simply because I was in the right place to do so.

          • Anonymous

            Ok I am not sure what you’re point is? They took the FAWN because it was weak! What makes you think it was not? Predators as a general rule always go after the prey they can obtain with the least effort this is why a pile of deer or moose parts makes such great bait it is VERY easy to get with almost no effort.

            Intelligence is a part of survival but strength will win. Bill gates is smarter then I am but if the two of us are in a field unarmed and hungry and there is a box of food there Bill can be as smart as he wants to be but being 6’6 280 and a strong outdoorsmen I would not bet he is getting the chow..

            As for you’re statement that smart jeans get passed on this to is false the majority of the time the biggest strongest males get to mate.

          • Anonymous

            hmm – try being on the top of that food chain without your gun.

      • Cecil Gray

        Coyotes hunt to eat, predatorphobics “hunt” to kill.

        • Anonymous

          You know how ridiculous that sounds?

          • Anonymous

            Pot, kettle, black.

          • Anonymous

            YOU know how ridiculous THAT sounds??? At least Cecil can string more than 3 words together!

          • Cecil Gray

            That’s because eradicating predators IS ridiculous. If you care so much about deer then start lobbying against the yard chippers and stop hunting in Northern Zones for a few years.

          • Anonymous

            Who said anything about eradicating them? Oh yea – YOU DID! I want them around for a good long time, so I can continue to hunt them! I don’t hunt deer in the northern zones! I have all I need on my properties in Mid and Coastal regions! I also support 2 deer yards on 2 different properties! What do YOU do, other than ridicule people that disagree with you???

          • Anonymous

            “I also support 2 deer yards on 2 different properties”

            Meaning your to lazy to get your deer without feeding them all year

          • Anonymous

            No worries your still in the lead with ridiculous statements.

      • Anonymous

        It is ok for hunters to shoot the deer but those nasty wild animals hunting for food better knock it off …….

    • Considering coyotes rarely hunt deer as they are lucky to weigh 35 pounds, the animal was likely dead before they started to feed on it. Eastern coyotes are known to have the ability to bring down deer, but their average diet consists of smaller game including rabbits and rodents(which help agricultural communities lessen the imapact of rodent infestations in grain as well as helping against thr threats of rodent carried diseases). Furthermore, a “pack” of coyotes rarely exceeds 4, and wouldn’t look or sound much different than a pack of dogs eating out of the same bowl that likely hadn’t had a meal in a week. As far as coyotes eating young faws alive(pertaining to below comment)..Acts like that are more rare than people realize. Wild ungulates have amazing herding abilities that help protect their young. Coyotes also feed on livestock less than previously thought as well. Unfortunately, most people can’t tell teh difference between a feral dog and a coyote. Many times, the culprit is the result of a pack of feral dogs(due to irresponisble pet ownership). I do not expect people to start loving coyotes and to think of them as cute harmless bunnies. They are predators, playing a necessary role in the maintenence of our ecosystem. However, stereotyping them as some mindless beast gets this country nowhere closer to understanding how our environment operates and how to keep it healthy and plentiful for continued generations. Coyotes have familial relationships, care for their young, show emotion, have a complex social structure, and struggle just like many humans in finding provisions for their families. Why humanity seems to target them for the behaviors we, ourselves, exhibit, makes absolutely no sense. Its hypocrisy at its highest level.

      • Anonymous

        i live in southern Ontario and are coyotes are any wheres between 35 to 65lbs and they take deer all the time, a local gas company was doing some work and found an large underground den that had the carcass of what they think to be over 100 deer in there are coyotes also live on a diet of domestic cats and dogs, they have been known for taking peoples small dogs right off the chain in there back yard.

        i know around here we had a large spike in the coyote population and a massive drop in the rabbit and pheasant population, after a few groups of people started hunting them and it become more popular to coyote hunt the numbers of pheasant and rabbits have started to come back and the number of coyotes are starting to drop so something is working

      • Coyotes rarely take down deer? I live in rural southern maine and over the years of being in the woods I have seen dozens of deer carcasses taken down by coyotes. Many times I’ve walked out on to a pond and follow a deer track, then start to see coyote tracks, then start to see blood, then as much as 3 miles later seen the carcass. A “pack” of coyotes rarely exceed 4? Then explain the packs of coyotes I see every year hunting/snowmobiling/hiking in the woods that push 20+ coyotes. I could say much more but I should probably before I say something I shouldn’t. Before you assume you know all the facts, spend some time in the woods first.

        • Cecil Gray

          Next time you walk 3 miles tracking coyotes in snow let me know.

          • Anonymous

            I did it on December 26th! Where were you Cecil? All snug inside?

          • Anonymous

            I use a Foxpro call or a bait pile. Make them come to ME…

        • As I said, Eastern Coyotes(which would be where you are)..Do have the ability to take down deer. However, their main source of food is rodents and small game(there is plenty of reading in scientific journals by people who have actually studied coyotes, their scat, and what they have eaten)…And packs of 20+? Seriously? Must be some kind of record. The only coyotes exceeding a pack of 20 was in Yellowstone before the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park..And that was near 20 years ago. If you are going to argue with my knowledge on coyotes..At least make a realistic argument. The only predators that form pack that large in your area are wolves(which dont exist in maine anymore) and feral dogs. So before you say anything….You might want to reconsider what “facts” you share with the public and to make sure they are at least close to accurate. The only time pack of coyotes exceed 4-6 animals is during the summer when they are caring for their pups…In the dead of winter, it is their breeding season, likely only having 4-6 animals(and thats a generous number)…I don’t need to “walk in the woods” to know about factual information regarding coyotes(something I have not seen from your posts)…I have been working with these animals specifically for over 7 years as well as networking with scientists(experts on coyotes) that have performed years of field work collecting data/observations…So please do not insult my experience and knowledge by posting misinformation and falsehoods.

          • Anonymous

            I supply samples and data to 2 different universities here in New
            England! It may surprise you to know that BOTH disagree with your
            ridiculous positions on coyotes! You are so full of yourself and
            anthropomorphism it’s ridiculous!

            Your exertions lack any real knowledge, experience or rational thought! You may have read all this garbage somewhere, or you are spending WAY too much time watching The Discovery Channel, but nothing you say comes from REAL WORLD experience!

            Until you are ready to live in the REAL WORLD, perhaps you should refrain from posting garbage!

            You could learn more about coyotes from reading the posts here from REAL WORLD coyote hunters than ANYTHING you have posted so far! All you are doing is intentionally misleading people with your dazzling amount of ignorance on the subject!

          • Really? 2 different Universities? Which ones? I highly doubt the biological sciences department disagrees with any of my information concerning coyotes. It is well documented in scientific journals in studies conducted by world renowned phd scientists that have studied coyotes specifically for over 30 years. I hardly think your little blood samples have much sway over that type of information.
            I have no need of the history channel. I currently work with these animals(and have for many years)..Not only that, but trained by phd ethologists respected around the world for their knowledge on animal behavioral sciences and contributions to science.
            Unfortunately, your “real world” is less realistic than I had previously thought. After you read a few articles on the matter..By people that are well aware of what they are talking about…Get back to me with an argument that is founded. Look into Marc Bekoff, Stan Ghert, Jon Way, Bob Crabtree…..Look into their coyote studies information. After the read, let me know if you have stepped back into an actual reality.

          • Anonymous

            Your research has not been done on Maine coyotes, otherwise you would be aware of the large percentage of wolf dna in our population, along with jaw structure changes and as well as pack behavior changes. Maine coyotes certainly pack during the winter months, and have shown pack co-operation hunting during this time,
            The studies showing litter size/viability as a direct relation to the breeding females age have thrown a stone into the comp/breeding theory, why ignore them? Are you a paid employee of an animal rights group? Your post suggest’s such.

          • Actually, I am not. However, I am well aware that Eastern Coyotes possess wolf dna. I am in regular contact with the scientist that conducted that research. Research I have saved on my computer and on websites. I am aware of litter size diversity…However..20 coyotes in a pack? quite ridiculous. With all the research I have reviewed..Along with my own…Pack sizes of coyotes(commonly called coywolves) do not exceed 20 animals. Eastern coyotes are mixed with red wolf dna(wolves that do not exhibit the large pack dynamics like their grey wolf counterparts)..And even this research lends credence to compensatory rebound. It is decided on prey availability more than the age of the breeding female. Most research lends credibility to this theory..As they are still more coyote than wolf. Only in the Eastern coyotes that have a substantial amount of wolf dna(which there arent that many left with higher levels)..does it start to show some dependence on breeding female age.

          • I am well aware of the research done on Eastern coyotes that possess varying levels of red wolf dna. I am aware they can form cohesive pack structures and will even hunt together. Depending geographically, western coyotes without wolf dna are just as capable. This doesn’t change the fact that their primary diet isnt usually deer. Additionally, the work done by jon way involving wolf dna in coyotes shows varying levels of wolf dna…most have lower percentages. But even with current research and possessing red wolf dna…pack sizes do not exceed 20 animals. As eastern coyotes normally possess little wolf dna, they are still more coyote like in behavior and ability for compensatory rebound. And no, I am not a paid employee of an animal rights group. I understand hunting and eating what you kill…I understand the necessity for lethal action for self preservation or protection of a loved one…I just do not find use or sense in attempting to kill off a species merely for the “fun of it”.

          • Anonymous

            a. A group of animals, such as dogs or wolves, that run and hunt together
            So, I guess large packs are possible.
            Of course coyotes do not hunt deer only,however at times focus on them enough to severly limit recruitment. Such as the fawn drop, when over 80% of their diet consists of deer. Or periods of deep snow depth, when their very nature (oppertunistic hunting)
            results in large slaughters not needed for survival. To belive in a natural balance occuring between predator/prey is a very deceptive practice. Highs and lows generated over time by starvation and disease equals much more suffering of any animal population.
            Plain and simple, management of numbers is humane, your dislike of the methods used do not change that.
            That being said, I wasted many hours in research and discusion over this subject throughout the years,and this is my last post here.
            I am curious as to who pays you to study coyotes full time. Your references thus far are purely biased.

          • 80% deer? Where did that come from? In Alaska a ten year study produced the Moose calf culprit of 80% to be the Grizzly but they opted for aerial wolf hunting to help. If that number comes from our IF&W then I do not believe it.

          • I do not get paid to research them. I do it out of my own pocket. As for my research and others..Many of the research done has been through unbiased means including stan ghert and bob crabtree…who have many years of documenting statistical data on coyotes. As for diet..Yes, during certain times of the year, they do consist more of deer than at other times…But not from hunting them down as most would be led to believe. Most of that has been found from roadkill remains, hunters wastes, and stealing kills from other predators, wolves(where there are still some) etc. While they are able to hunt deer…As I have said several times..They are able…They just dont hunt deer as their main source of food. Coyotes are opportunistic..eating as easily as possible. The expenditure of energy used to bring down a deer is usually something they will avoid. And yes they can and do have packs…but as I have said several times…not exceeding 20 members. That is ridiculous. Most of a coyote’s diet consists of small rodents..They even have 12% of their diets consist of vegetables in the summer.

          • I am aware of the pack structure and physiological changes eastern coyotes have that possess red wolf dna..However, many do not posess large percetages of wolf dna and adhere more to their coyote behavior. While some behaviors differ, they do not form packs exceeding 20

      • Anonymous

        Jami please feel free to come up here to Washington co and let me show you a few videos that prove you wrong. Of course so does that fact that they do this and it is well known by anybody who bothers to read a bit or observe nature.

        • As I just mentioned in another post…Eastern Coyotes can bring down deer. However, it is not their main diet. Most deer carcasses found fed on by coyotes have been found to be already dead before the coyotes started to feed on it. They are very effective garbage disposals. And this is also well known by anyone that truly observes nature and reads a bit other than sensationalized media postings

          • Anonymous

            Nobody said it was there main diet. With the snow we just got you can bet all of deer who can not run will become chow. Predators go for the easy meal. The more hungry they are the more they will risk to eat.

          • You are right. No one did say that. The reason for my comments on the matter were to inform those worried about the predation on deer as the reason to “cull” the coyotes population…When they hardly make a dent in it. That was the sole purpose of my comments on the matter. It was the rebuttals that kept insinuating they consume a lot more of it than they actually do. And you are right..desperation does cause hunting behaviors to change a little. They feed on things they normally wouldn’t(garbage, etc)..However, an animal on the brink of starvation(coyotes for example) will usually not expend the amount of energy it takes to take down a full grown deer unless it were a sure thing. Their failure rate at hunting(as with wolves) is quite high. If they lost that deer while they were so close to starving, the inability to boost their energy back up would likely be certain death.

          • Anonymous

            “With the snow we just got you can bet all of deer who can not run will become chow.”

            A deer that cannot run in December is unlikely to survive until May. If that deer does manage to survive until May then it becomes a prime candidate for culling by humans in November. If you like eating old and diseased venison then keep killing the coyotes.

      • Cecil Gray

        Predator-phobia is a epidemic in Maine.

        • Anonymous

          It’s not just in Maine.

      • Anonymous

        YOU ARE JUST FLAT OUT WRONG! Now you are free to believe whatever made-up delusions you wish, but don’t even try to pass them off as fact!

        I can show you videos of coyotes taking down deer!
        I can show you videos of coyotes attacking birthing does!
        I can show you THE SAME videos I showed the Game Wardens!
        THE SAME videos I shot out in the deer yard on my property!

        We all get from your posts that you LOVE animals and HATE any infringement on their existence by insignificant humans, but don’t sully up the place with false assertions and lies!

        • I never said they couldnt take down deer…I even specifically stated that Eastern coyotes did…But it is not their main diet. Reading is available on this matter. Consider looking into Jon Way’s research involving Eastern Coyotes….By someone that has actually studied the subject. Then feel free to comment when you have appropriate information and not sensationalized media coverage.

          • Anonymous

            I am very aware of Jon Way, and his research is highly suspicious to his colleges! If that’s the best you can do, it ain’t nearly good enough! You are trying to argue small points, when the big picture is THERE ARE TOO MANY COYOTES IN MAINE, PERIOD!

          • Reasonable conversation is an unknown trait Jami when it comes to the no it alls of the county. They remind me of Texans, their way or the highway and scientific proof means zilch.

          • It is unfortunate how true that rings. I am not the “tree hugging hippie” many of these repliers seem to think. I am aware of the benefits of hunting..if someone is being humane and eating what they kill..As nature has always intended. I just find it sad that those claiming higher evolution are actually the ones going backwards and unfortunately, taking many of us with them.

          • Unfortunately it is the direction of the mouthpieces who claim to be ethic Sportsmen and Sportswomen in Maine. The baiting industry invented the lobby to protect bear baiting and it has filtered down to the media and is shamelessly promoted by our IF&W. This claim to preserve deer, which means deer hunting, is a tried and true symptom of kill something off to kill something else. I have been a Master Guide for years and guided many deer hunters in the Big Woods. Does that make me special, no, but it makes my first hand experiences worthy of comment.

        • Anonymous

          So what?
          The wild animals killed a deer and ( GASP ) ate it.
          What is the issue here?
          You upsetty that they killed the deer you happened to be baiting for hunting season?

      • Anonymous

        I supply samples and data to 2 different universities here in New England! It may surprise you to know that BOTH disagree with your ridiculous positions on coyotes! You are so full of yourself and anthropomorphism it’s ridiculous!

    • Scott Harriman

      Wild animals eat other wild animals? Amazing!

    • Cecil Gray

      Grow up and expand your mind.

      • Dr. Cowboy

        We will never be able to hunt the coyote to extinction. It just won’t happen, they are a very cunning and slew animal. There were many towns just a few years ago that were overrun with them, so that the cat populations were decimated. No real concern with hunting these pest.

      • Anonymous

        Grow up and try to write more than one sentence!

        • Anonymous

          Oh, the miracle of unintentional irony.

    • Anonymous

      You clearly don’t understand that nature will always take its course, with or without man interfering. Wolves, coyotes, and others of their kind have long roamed the earth in search of prey and your particular view of that is hardly an excuse for killing them at will.

      • Anonymous

        So has Man! Man has long roamed the earth in search of prey! Now, all of a sudden, it’s denied!

        • Anonymous

          Cry me a river.

          • Anonymous

            Why, you are already a cesspool!
            How many Brookies you hook by the mouth? Sounds pretty barbaric to me!

          • How serious to expect people to take you when you cannot argue a post without being vulgar and ignorant? No one has said hunting prey should be denied to man…Prey, by definition, is an animal hunted and killed by another FOR FOOD. What others are suggesting, is that if hunting and trapping are to continue, it is done for food instead of wasteless murder that effects the balance of our environment.
            your arguments that fawns deserve a fighting chance..how is that not total hypocrisy considering your views on coyotes?. All animals deserve a fighting chance(humans as well)…It is not fair or consistent to advocate for one type of animal and not another. Deer cause more deaths a year to humans in traffic accidents than any other animal. Coyotes should be able to feed their young…It is the natural order of the world…If there were no coyotes/predators to cull some of the deer population, even more people would die through deer related accidents, those beautiful fawns would grow to die of starvation due to overpopulation, and eventually they would die off as well.

          • Anonymous

            Yawn! Okay, now you are approaching scary the way you seem to be stalking me! I know, I’ll go live my life and get ready for tomorrow’s hunt and you can continue acting all high and mighty! You seem to be very good at it, and are obviously an expert, unlike coyotes!

          • Anonymous

            “How serious to expect people to take you when you cannot argue a post without being vulgar and ignorant?”

            He doesn’t. He’s just trying to shut down discussion of a topic that makes him feel uncomfortable because it calls into question his belief structure. Let his eat the diseased deer that he so desperately wants to preserve.

        • So coyote is prey?

      • Anonymous

        If nature will always take it’s course, as you say, what is all this chicken little hand wringing over global warming?

    • Anonymous

      “When hunters stop finding the ripped apart carcasses and entrails of deer in the woods.”

      So in your mind it is better to have the hunters cull diseased animals and feed their potentially contaminated flesh to their family than let predators who have adapted to these hazards do the job? Good idea there.

      • Anonymous

        Where do you get your ideas from – Idiots Guide to the Universe?

        • Anonymous

          Pot, kettle, black.

  • Anonymous

    Just saw a coyote the other day across the ditch on I-95 a couple miles north of Hogan Road.

  • Anonymous

    What a waste of time & energy. Man has been trying to eradicate coyotes for 200 years. 200 years from now the numb ones will still be trying.

  • Anonymous

    The name Timothy Treadwell is coming to mind.

  • Anonymous

    It’s a difficult truth, but everybody “owns” the wildlife.

    This ownership is managed mainly in two ways.

    Individual landowners can control access to their land and impose their personal standards within their own property.

    And State and Federal agencies manage our ownership according to rules that are established in several public ways.

    Unfortunately it’s true that the absolute rights and caring interests of owners like Joshua O’Donnell who feel the hurts when killing starts, are given last place in the public rules. Unless land is posted, armed hunters can enter upon it day and night except Sunday through the entire year. They don’t need to ask permission to prowl armed next to residences in the middle of the night. And without asking any permission, they can kill any game animals that may be treasured by the owners. They may let their packs of hounds run bear, bobcat and coyotes without heed of signs. Livestock suffer disturbance.

    And these hunters are in the minority of the owners – something less than 20% of Maine citizens in total take out hunting, trapping and fishing licenses. Regrettably they dominate the public standards that are in place. And equally regrettably, they are not adequately supporting restoration of our forest habitat – the real path to abundant wildlife.

    The hunting lobby is determined to oppose any requirement that permission ever be asked to enter armed upon private land for hunting. Their claim is that because the wildlife are owned by the public, they have the entire right to enter and kill wherever they please unless prohibited. Never mind the rights of the other majority of the public owners.

    There’s only one solution: post land, and post more land. A new law makes it possible to post land by placing a “safety purple” paint stripe, at least 8 inches in length between 3 and 5 feet high every 100 feet on trees, posts and stones along property boundaries.
    Paint stripes don’t cost like signs to buy and replace after being torn down. Farmers, hunters who own property where they invest in habitat management and feed plots for their own hunting, people who treasure their share of wildlife in a natural wild state – all benefit by taking management into their own hands.

    Perhaps, through private land posting, we will get strings of pearls through our landscape where the interests of those who treasure their share of wildlife alive, not dead, will be met. And all our lives enriched. And we will all be able in good spirit to continue to support the rights of our friends, family and fellow citizens who have their own rights to hunt their share. Thank you, in admiration, for sharing your very right feelings, Joshua.

    • Anonymous

      Except for all the inaccurate contentions, your post just sounds like Josh’s, only more eloquent! Wrong, but eloquent!

      • Anonymous

        Sorry to confuse with facts those with minds made up on one side of a discussion where those who value their wildlife alive, not dead, have as much right as those who want theirs otherwise. I hunted to feed a young family and now, because I find I don’t like to kill and treasure wildlife in a natural state, I hunt no more. Would kill for food again if need arises – but never for the “joy” of killing.

        There’s truth in all views. Coyotes and deer coexist successfully throughout most of the range of whitetails. Deer predation management is completely unbalanced: bear take as many or more fawns than other predators and they are not “managed” to increase deer populations. Lyme disease increases with deer populations – ask Monhegan and Isleboro. Deer predation helps reduce human disease. Coyotes prey heavily on mice, the other vector of Lyme carrying ticks. The North Woods forest deer habitat has been decimated by mechanized logging in the last thirty years. It is illegal to place bait on private land without permission.

        It comes down to finding the balance that is fair to all. And in the face of a set of rules that allow access unless land is posted and favor armed intrusions into private property day and night all year round without asking permission, that balance can only be struck by action on the part of private property owners. It used to be that land could be shared for hunting over a few months of the year in daytime. That changed seriously in the last decade.

        And the final accurate fact, should any consider it a contention, is that land can be posted “Access by Permission” with painted stripes. See:

        http://www.maine.gov/sos/cec/rules/04/058/058c024.doc

        • Anonymous

          Sounds like your mind is made up then!
          Our minds made up – BAD!
          Your mind made up – GOOD!
          Bear most certainly ARE managed, for population and predation!

          You want balance? Stay out of the woods for a few months of the year, then they are all yours the rest of the time! I don’t go out in the woods in the spring, summer, or right now! So go, enjoy!

          And I don’t have to hunt others property unless I’m asked to, or invited to! I have more than enough of my own! I don’t post it, but maybe I should to keep all the anti-hunting, non-hunting riff-raff out!
          Good suggestion! I think I will!

          That’s several hundred less acres with previously free access that will now be closed to non-hunters thanks to you!

          • Bears are not “managed” they are fed millions of pounds of doughnuts and the like then shot lazily for money. It all came alive in 1982 when the IF&W realized the dollar signs and declared the bear a big game animal.

          • Anonymous

            Awww sweet pea thinks they are the only special snowflake with land in Maine – how quaint.

  • Anonymous

    yawwnnn….whats that?

  • Anonymous

    Well I am a yote hunter. Last year I took 87. We do NOT share the same woods why because I hunt on MY land and others PRIVATE property most of then ASK me to hunt the yotes as they wreak havoc on everything from dogs and cats to chickens. What do we do with them after we shoot them well that depends when they have there winter coats we skin them and sell the pelts. What do I do with the carcass you’re not gonna like it but I use it to bait more yotes. As for you interfering with a hunt well that is illegal and you would get in trouble for it plus as I woudl be on private property you woudl also get a trespassing charge. Same with trapping the law says interfering with a trap is illegal. As for what we shoot and where we shot it at, sex, weight and other stats are not required to be recorded so no YOU do not have a right to such information though if you wish I do keep records of this type as do many other hunters up here and I would be more then happy to share that with you I even have the EXACT GPS coordinates for each one.

    We operate within the LAW. Though we obey the law we get harassed by the IFW all the time to check our license and other things. We still do it. Why well we enjoy hunting it also needs to be done in places and it CAN be profitable though most of us spend more then we make back. This is Maine hunting is part of life for many here. it has been from long before it was a state. Many of us get allot of our food form the land. the majority of meat my family eats comes form hunting.

    This is America just because YOU do not like something does not give the right to stop those who do from doing it.

    • Cecil Gray

      Yotes huh? Round and round; round and round; some day you might figure it out.

      • Anonymous

        If you have something constructive to say, we wish you would get on with it! Otherwise, your less-than-intelligent snipes are useless!

        • Anonymous

          He loves his yotes.

        • Cecil Gray

          If you have something other than killing a species off as constructive approach then feel free to enlighten us.

          • Anonymous

            Why do you keep insisting on killing them off, Cecil? Do you hate them or something? (You seem to hate just about everything!)
            I want them around a good long time, so I can keep on killing them!

      • jason

        CECIL OLD BUDDY OLD PAL! HERE WE ARE AGAIN! Why can’t you just accept the fact that this is a heritage and it’s going to be around for a long time. Making people mad and testing everyone’s patience is getting you no where. You comment on every post no matter what it is. Take a break. As far as the discussion in the paper… that guy is a creepy fella! Following people around in the woods or even any where is weird. Messing with guys traps and stalking them down in the woods is totally creepy! Would you like it if he was to follow you around, as you guided bird watches? I would love to sit down with you and really try to understand a person like you. We all have different ways of life, but sometimes it’s hard to grasp your thoughts. There’s a balance with every thing. Why don’t you put all the time you spend posting stuff, into helping Maine and the homeless or something creative. Ya I know, I’m on here too posting this, and my wife is behind me telling me to just forget about all of it, but I can’t. The creepy fella and guys like you effect my family and my heritage and my children’s future.

        • It’s not about what I say “OLD BUDDY OLD PAL”. It’s about some traditions that are sick ones that serve nothing but a repetitive denial of factual science. You can kill coyotes all you want and it will NEVER change the relationship between predator, prey, food, and habitat.

          • jason

            who said anything about trying to change the relationship between predator, prey, food, and habitat?

          • There it goes again right over your head.

          • jason

            your such a wast of air!.

          • How’s it feel in the corner?

          • Indiscriminate killing changes things.

          • Anonymous

            See there is the problem you live in you’re house or appt and have no connection to nature where many of us live off the land. The meat we eat comes form what we hunt not what we buy at the store. I think buying meat at a store is sick I woudl not eat store bought meat of you paid me. But see we both have different opinions and we both have the right to speak them out loud. The difference is I woudl NEVER try to force you to live by MY opinion.

            As for the predator and prey relationship we ( people ) by being here have already altered that. The harvesting of the wood that built you’re home altered that. The food you buy at the store altered that. The car you drive altered that. You’re very existence altered that. So maybe you should read and educate yourself before you climb up so very high on you’re soapbox and tell me how to live my life..

          • I am not telling you how to live your life. I am telling you that killing coyotes just to kill them is useless.

  • Dr. Cowboy

    Not a fan of trapping but I would stand by a conviction of anyone disturbing them. Joshua, you need to stay out of the woods. You are more of a danger than the coyotes are!

  • Anonymous

    Coyote trappers, when you find one of those venison loving coyotes in your trap, transport them to MDI. We need some venison loving predators because our coyotes, of which we have many packs, aren’t keeping the deer population at a healthy level. Maybe ours will learn from the newbees.

    • Anonymous

      AGREED! Our property on MDI is overrun with deer! But we also have property elsewhere that is overrun with coyotes, and very few if any deer left! Jami Hammer’s contention that coyotes don’t kill deer is just laughable and ignorant!

      • Anonymous

        Ecosystems. Educate yourself about them and the solutions to these mysterious problems will suddenly become clear.

        Coyotes certainly eat deer. Coyotes do not eat deer that you would want to eat. Seriously.

        • Anonymous

          Yup – Idiots Guide to the Universe! You must know it by heart by now!

      • whats laughable is your inability to read an entire post, and instead fostering your ignorance onto others. As i have said several times…I never said they dont kill deer. I said they can..But that it is not their primary diet…I hardly think anywhere with coyotes would be “overrun” with deer if that were the case. So again, before accusing ignorance, please keep yours in check first.

        • Anonymous

          You read books, I LIVE IT! I’ll take MY experience over your reading any day! You are still arguing minute points not on topic! But we get it, you have nothing else!

          • And yes, I read books. I certainly wouldn’t apologize for that. It is strange that you would find contention with it. However, aside from books, I have worked for coming up on 8 years specifically studying 17 coyotes and 2 red foxes(yes, in REAL LIFE), their behaviors, and contributing that knowledge to the public. I was trained to do so under the guidance of a well respected ethologist and former professor of Purdue University. So yes I read books, but I also study them myself along with other colleagues…So I will take my books and my expanded knowledge on these animals..over mindless killing and torture of our native wildlife.

  • Anonymous

    I remember sitting at the driver’s table at Dysart’s one morning listening to a clod with the I.Q. of a Labrador retriever gloat about chasing coyotes on his snowmobile until they dropped from exhaustion and then driving over them with his picked track. I thought of just how little we have actually evolved from living in caves and dragging our women around by the hair.

    • Anonymous

      YOU DRAG YOUR WOMAN AROUND BY THE HAIR? Well THAT explains a lot!

      You must REALLY hate it when a driver hits a deer with their car, then takes it!

      • Anonymous

        Your user name explains a lot. What does the malicious killing of a coyote for the fun of it have to do with the accidental death of a deer? To compare the two is beyond inane. I have no problem with hunting if you intend to eat what ever you kill. I used to hunt years ago. I do have a problem with killing for the “fun” of it. That is sick and disgusting.

  • Anonymous

    The dead beaver frozen in the ice as bait works pretty good, drop them like a bad habit with the mini 14…Yes folks that is a 223 round…..Oh my.

    • northernmaine

      You mean you can hunt with one of those evil rifles that are on the upcoming gun ban list?
      Oh yeah, thats right I use an AR-15 that I purpose built for hunting these vermin.
      I like to use coyote popsicles ( scraps from the previous year deer/moose kill frozen in a 5 gallon bucket)
      While I don’t call for the outright extermination of the species we need a lot fewer coyote’s then we have. Maybe when Joshua Odonnell loses a cat or domestic dog to a pack of these critters he might change his mind.

      • Anonymous

        Dont let them catch you with that AR-15….LOL A gun that is taboo….

  • Anonymous

    You boys would cringe knowing that they were testing bats with small bombs attached in the 1940’s….PETA where were you…LOL

    • Anonymous

      Not to mention Skinner’s pigeon-guided missile.

      A suggestion: live-trap coyotes and surreptitiously release in Portland. Solves either the coyote or the bleeding-heart nature lover problem, or both.

      • Anonymous

        Good way of getting rid of the nasty birds, ..

      • Cecil Gray

        The baiters did that with bear back during the referendum. Trap some rational thought in Portland and release it in the county that should solve the extermination insanity problem.

  • Anonymous

    when there’s no more yotes to kill

  • Anonymous

    He asks if he can spring the traps before anybody gets hurt, and then asks if that is against the law. It most definitely is against the law. Maine does not allow the molestation of either hunters or trappers or their gear. Typical hogwash from the left.

  • jason

    that cecil is something else!!! lol

    • He’s something else alrighty, sheetfire boy he knows us inside out.

      • jason

        some day cecil,some day!

  • Scott Harriman

    The problem with killing predators is that it only makes them reproduce more quickly.

    The females that survive have larger litters and you end up with more than you started with.

  • Joel Cat Cannon

    I think ………….if you shoot it , you should eat it. I think people who just shoot things and do not eat it are useless . sitting back with your fancy callers dosent seem like a challenge to me. If you want to call it a sport , get sporty ! get off yer buttts and persue. Im sure you will get results . I do … and its waaaay more fun. I remember when I couldnt walk within 30′ of a creek without spooking the fish .they could hear me comming. not anymore. Oh! and yeeeeHaaaa!

  • Joel Cat Cannon

    They dont just mess with cats, dogs and chickens. They help the snakes keep the rodents , RATs. ect. count down. We had the chicken problem ,but a 2′ footing around the coupe solved it, and our dogs loooved chasing coyotes. We would to on the horses , with them.

    • Thanks for enlightening us with the savage side of the Maine “sportsman”.

  • Joel Cat Cannon

    EAT IT BRAAAAAH!!!!!

  • Anonymous

    How did you become a killer of coyotes? By walking down the trails- that you- and I – walk and seeing the maimed remains of a deer torn apart by coyotes.

    How can I help you to stop? You cannot. We will not stop until every darn coyote is gone.
    When will you know you’ve killed enough? Again- when they are gone

  • Anonymous

    You don’t live next door. You live in Brunswick.

    Your writing style reminds me of my middle school days.

  • Anonymous

    People Eating Tasty Animals is at it again !

  • Anonymous

    I have never harmed a coyote. And, yet I know they need to be “culled” to be kept under control just as the deer and moose are culled each hunting season. Legal deer & moose hunting seems to keep the herd healthy and relatively free of disease. But, if one doesn’t like the taste of venison or moose, I think they should not be killed for sport. Being an avid woodsman, I also know that wherever I see deer tracks in the snow I generally see coyote tracks moving in the same direction right beside them. And, yes I have seen remains of deer in the woods that were taken down by coyote. It’s not pretty. But I consider snaring and trapping a canine animal in the woods to be inhumane. There are better ways to hunt them.

  • Anonymous

    “Every trap you set is a threat to my security. Let me know where you have placed them. Every coyote killed is an attack on my freedom”
    I’ll give you point #1, But an attack on your freedom? Freedom of what? The only freedom being attacked is the coyote’s.
    Over dramatizing just makes you a laughing stock and does nothing to further your cause.

You may also like