November 21, 2017
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Comments for: C.N. Brown enters competitive electricity market

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  • Anonymous

    Solar power and smaller wind turbines are becoming more affordable and that is where put your money. Once you are independent you are no longer a slave paying the king.

    • Anonymous

      The average household would need 4 windmills running all the time to operated a normal families house.. you forgot to mention cut you comsumption by 85% to survive on a wind mill and a colector

      • Anonymous

        One 4 killowatt wind generator if the wind factor is strong in that location is what would be needed in addition to solar panels. You do NOT cut your consumption by 85% as you state, you need to get some facts.

        • Maine Wind Concerns

          Let’s say there are half a million electric customers in Maine. If 100,000 or 200,000 of them went partially or fully “off the grid,” would the grid’s costs become unsustainable for the 400,000 or 300,000 customers left paying for it? If customers who chose to leave the grid want to have instant access to the grid for backup or supplemental electricity, how much will they be willing to pay for it?

          • Anonymous

            We have been off grid for 20 years. We have had the entire investment returned and more. I am not qualified to ans. your questions. I will add that our home is complete with all appliances and it is a pleasure not losing power during a storm.

  • Maine Wind Concerns

    Interesting to see how this competitive service plays out. Customers don’t necessarily get to have their cake and eat it too, though. Take Electricity Maine, for instance, which claims on its website that there is no catch. But to get their “prime savings” the customer must agree to a one year contract, with a $100 “cost recovery fee” going to Electricity Maine if the customer switches before the end of the contract. Not a big deal, but as the March standard offer’s anniversary approaches, customers might be wise to sit on the sidelines before committing to a year.

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