June 22, 2018
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Comments for: Washington County jail doctor charged with leaving loaded gun in bathroom of Ellsworth L.L Bean

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  • guest

    Apparently some gun owners shouldn’t have guns if they aren’t mindful enough…..

    • Sadly this happens often.

      I’m pro-gun and carry myself but to those that have down voted me, good job ignoring the truth.

      • Anonymous

        Got statistics?

          • Anonymous

            Those aren’t statistics, those are links for anecdotal evidence — the weakest form of evidence you can have.

          • I have no clue if anyone keeps stats on how often it does happen. My point still stands, it does happen often. I don’t need stats to prove that.

          • Anonymous

            Actually you do.

          • So all the true news stories out there are not facts and should be disregarded as evidence then, correct?

          • Anonymous

            You were asked for stats, and you provided a list of examples that in no way proves that such incidents happen often. That’s like providing a few highlight clips of a baseball team hitting home runs in support of a claim that the team hits home runs “often.”
            What is “often”?

          • Did you even take the time to look at any of the stories? The majority of them took place in the past 2 years, which means it does happen often.

            1. 2012
            2. 2012
            3. 2012
            4. 2010
            5. 2012
            6. 2012
            7. 2011
            8. 2012
            9. 2012

            And I stopped looking after those nine but there are plenty more out there. I love firearms but enjoy having your head in the sand.

            7 out of the 9 took place in 2012 and there are more out there that I did not post about.

          • Anonymous

            Nine instances out of how many people with guns in public and how many times those people carried guns in public?

          • A lot of those stories where about LEO’s but keep your head buried in the sand.

          • Anonymous

            God forbid you call a magazine a clip;) or a semi an auto;)

          • Anonymous

            The date simply mean they happened recently ( not frequently) and perhaps that is a “clue’ too, though.. That those buying recently don’t have a clue what they are doing with a gun or how to handle them properly and responsibly. They have just jumped on to a “It’s “cool’ to own/ carry a gun” band wagon . It’s not a TOY boys .

            It’s concerning that this guy was more interested that he lost his gun and wanted it back and NOT that he was concerned who might get their hands on it . it seems like he just expected to get it back like he lost a scarf —-with no fuss or questioning.

          • Tom Brown III

            I think he was asking for like per 100,000 an actual rate. 2 in every 100,000 forgot their weapon in the crapper in 2012.

            I think the links you provided prove and this story prove 2 things. This does happen and this incident is not a lone random incident. Though none of them prove “often” which is a term describing prevalence or rate of occurrence.

          • Yes..There are alot of AD’s by Law Enforcement..Had two myself and had several work buddies that had them too One guy even shot he partner with a 357 magnum in the leg. This happened on the southern Border…In my case the dopers dropped their Coke load and absconded back to Mexico :) warning shots are not allowed.

          • Anonymous

            There are no stats that people flee to Maine for the welfare either !!!!

          • Anonymous

            You’re far, far off topic, Mr Diversion.

          • Anonymous

            Who are you em, the Diversion cop?

          • Anonymous

            Apparently ryan, you talk out of both sides of your mouth as many here are doing. “One time is too many vs Often is not specific enough.” There are risks to anything. How many times have you heard of a loaded gun left in a restroom in your life? This is #1 for me and I am in my 60s. So it’s hardly common. Let’s get a grip here.

          • Anonymous

            Who needs stats? One time is to many. Why is a 72 year old jail doctor carrying a weapon while shopping at L L Bean? This guy should be fired immediately.

          • Tom Brown III

            too*

          • Anonymous

            Would you say the same thing about a car hitting a motorcycle that kills people too ?

          • Anonymous

            Can’t compare the two.

          • Anonymous

            Did you even bother to look into the lack of information on this person? He isn’t just some recently-hired jail doctor that fell off the turnip truck.

          • Anonymous

            Good one Kev! Last night’s local news was this: it’s snowing, you might want to allow time to get there, make sure your dogs water bowls don’t freeze and wear boots. Give me (and all of us) a break from “their” reality. Euclid or Eustace or what was the name of that snowstorm? Gag me.

          • Anonymous

            which gives more ammunition for placing sensible limits on them..

      • I don’t carry, so I don’t understand how someone simply “forgets” that they left their firearm in a public place. It’s not like forgetting where one parked their car at the mall.

        Or is it?

        • It depends on the type of holster you are wearing. I have removed my firearm from the holster more than once while doing my business. Some people even use the Hanes hammock which I hope you can figure out.

          I’ve placed my firearm in the Hanes hammock, on top of the toilet paper dispenser and behind me on top of the toilet lid itself and I think that is where people go wrong. They forget to look behind them as most can flush a toilet without looking behind them and the back of the toilet is normally very flat.

          I don’t know how I could ever walk out without mine. I would notice my firearm no longer being present in any of my holsters.

          How people do it? I’m not sure but they do. Again, depending on the stall and the holster it can be tricky using the toilet while armed for some.

          • Anonymous

            These must be the kind of people who forget to flush after they leave the stall. There ought to be a law against that, too.

          • I agree but I also stated that most can flush a toilet without looking behind them.

          • Anonymous

            not flushing doesn’t potentially KILL someone else .

          • Anonymous

            The automatic flushers are making people lazy. They probably figure the computer will do it for them.

          • Anonymous

            My son forgot to flush after he had a Wendy’s Baconator once, so I have to disagree there.

          • Anonymous

            haha!

          • Thanks for the reply GW

          • Anonymous

            basically better to shoot someone else then yourself??

          • Tom Brown III

            I dunno I have carried keltec p3at and a taurus tcp. Those guns are so light I don’t notice them during day to day activties.

            though I always take my weapon out of the holster and put it on the back of the john so it doesnt clank against the floor or so someone doesn’t see it under the stall and make a grab for it(never know). This guy maybe is just 72, old, forgetful, poor excuses and if he is that old and forgetful he probably shouldn’t be carrying. CCW should have some of the same requirements of drivers licenses.

          • Anonymous

            Maybe those who find it tricky to be armed and in need of relief are at an impass which can only be resolved by either leaving the gun home in order to follow the biological imperative or employing some extreme form of plumbing control. The first might be a whole lot easier – not to mention comfortable – than the second.

          • Anonymous

            CRAPOLA………..

          • Anonymous

            Of all the challenges we face in this life I’m sure it must be really “tricky using the toilet while armed”!

          • This is one of the most informative posts I’ve ever seen. Thank you for sharing.

            The humble Farmer

        • Anonymous

          It’ll come to you when you get older. Look at the brain like a hard drive on a computer, after a while you fill it up and then things get dropped/erased, short term memory is the first to go.
          Being the dude was in the military maybe keeping a bullet chambered during war time is the normal, I don’t know that for sure, but it’s what I’d want to do. Being elderly in a country that has started massive disrespect and uncaring for the elderly makes them targets for crime.

          • Anonymous

            72 is not “elderly”.

          • Anonymous

            Sorry no personal offense intended. I just figure since so many people are dying in their 40’s and 50’s that anyone who makes it to 65 are elderly after that.

        • Anonymous

          People leave their children behind, walk into the street while texting or talking on cellphones, or leave a purse on a car roof. They are not all old people. What we have here are numerous posters who think this is an excuse to subvert the Second Amendment to the Constitution. Good luck with that.

          • Anonymous

            And one of these things justifies the other somehow? Please explain.

          • Anonymous

            My point is this: life is dangerous and unpredictable. People make mistakes. Depend on
            yourselves and stop thinking some official will come to save you. They won’t. They do
            not care about YOU at all. Wake the heck up and smell the coffee. Does
            that make sense to you now?

      • Anonymous

        Yes, and do you usually carry with a round in the chamber? Yes, I know that 2 seconds could be the difference between life and death but if a kid had found it…

        • If you don’t have one in the chamber you might as well be carrying a rock.

          • Anonymous

            Tell that to the guy in PA who left a gun store with a new gun, dropped the clip out promptly killed his own kid because he neglected to clear the chamber.

          • Not trying to be rude but what does that have to do with me always carrying plus one?

          • Anonymous

            You are quite civil in response to my flipness. Thank you, sir.

            Just making the point that the having a round in the chamber could have had tragic consequences in this case, if a child had found the weapon, pointed it at his friend and pulled the trigger. I also know from my own collection that I can chamber a round a lot faster than I can decide if the dude with an ar-15 is on his way to a school or simply exercising his second amendment rights.

          • Anonymous

            Guess you’d better get busy teaching kids that guns are not toys, hey?

          • Anonymous

            Sure, right after I teach them how to ride a motorcycle without a helmet.

          • Anonymous

            I would teach my child that a motorcycle is not for kids, to stay away from it and off it until they were old enough to operate one. What is your problem with teaching kids about real life?

          • Anonymous

            It’s hard to teach kids to avoid random acts of stupidity like leaving a loaded gun in a public bathroom. But maybe that’s what real life has come to.

          • Anonymous

            anyone who points a gun at another without intending to shoot them is a fool and deserves to be charged with reckless conduct.

    • Anonymous

      Even though I’m a licensed CCW person, I have to agree with you. This gentleman is not on the ball enough to still be carrying apparently. He has done the rest of us responsible gun owners a huge disservice and could have caused a much much worse incident through his forgetfulness but luckily that was avoided. Much like the seniors that get confused and drive their cars into storefronts or worse perhaps some mandatory testing is in order when you reach age 70 or thereabouts. And I mean for drivers as well as CCW folk.

      • Many different LEO’s have done the same thing as well as ICE and Secret Service agents.

        • Anonymous

          Or even shot themselves in the leg in a very recent occurrence.

          • Are you referring to the DEA agent that shot himself in the foot or a different guy?

          • Anonymous

            “FREEDOM, N.H. — A Carroll County sheriff’s deputy shot himself in the
            leg Monday night while at the scene of a shooting on Huckins Road, state
            police said.”

          • Oops! I missed that one.

        • Anonymous

          And your point is? I don’t care if J. Edgar Hoover did it, it’s still irresponsible.

          • Anonymous

            J. Edgar always kept his guns and panty hose undercover.

        • Anonymous

          and at least one private citizen — so if LE O do it it is OK??

        • Anonymous

          “Many different LEO’s have done the same thing”

          That doesn’t make anyone feel any better. LEO at the local level is generally lacking competency to begin with.

      • Anonymous

        Which presents a good question – once a CWP is issued, can it be suspended or revoked? In this case, his CWP should be suspended for some period of time.

        • Yes, it can be revoked and it should.

          • Anonymous

            Thank you. I was always curious about that.

          • Anonymous

            …but it won’t did you read the part of him working for the WCJ?

          • I didn’t know he had SO credentials when I made my comment.

    • a dope boy

      And he just got hired as the jail physician. That alone cracks me up. That’s enough right there to keep someone on the straight and narrow. 72 and still practicing medicine !? The dude can’t even remember his gun, I mean how do you forget that, unless your careless to begin with. I wouldn’t let this guy prescribe for my dog.

      • Anonymous

        ” I wouldn’t let this guy prescribe for my dog.”

        Neither would anyone else and that’s why he’s practicing at the jail. Dogs are more important that prisoners in most people’s minds.

      • Ansel Hazen

        HEY HEY, haven’t you ever taken a dump that just pretty much cleared your thought process for a bit? If this guy had to drop one in the stalls at LL Bean he hadda go man!

    • Anonymous

      The same can be said for people that own cars that speed cause accidents to . What happens to them ?

      • Anonymous

        speed doesn’t “cause” accidents.. it can make them worse.

      • Anonymous

        speed doesn’t “cause” accidents.. it can make them worse.

      • Anonymous

        A car is a transportation machine. A gun is a killing machine. One of these things is not like the other.

    • Anonymous

      The real travesty here is that
      “police issued him a summons for reckless conduct, a Class D misdemeanor punishable by up to 364 days in jail and and a $2,000 fine”
      You don’t issue him a summons, you take his carry permit and his gun away IMMEDIATELY and then worry about how much to fine him.
      I’m for folks having carry permits and I’m against most gun control, but I have a 6 year old grandson that is mature enough to go into L.L.Bean’s bathroom by himself, do his business and wash his hands all by himself. I ain’t sure if he’s mature enough to not pick up a loaded, chambered handgun and pretend to be a cop, robber or a cowboy.
      Holy crap folks!!!
      Sadly this happens often? Hadn’t better happen twice with the same user! If it does, someone is sure as hell failing at their job!

  • Rocky4

    OOOOPS!

    • Anonymous

      That a 54 Chevy Bel Aire? Had a convertible like that back in the day… even same color.

      • Rocky4

        Yup. That one isn’t mine. I had a 4dr puff. Hope to get another
        some day. I’m gettin old though. We’ll see.

  • Anonymous

    Can’t they track down the owner by running the serial number on the gun?

    • Anonymous

      Not if they bought it from a private owner

      • Anonymous

        So that’s just one more reason to regulate guns like, say prescription medications, which you can only purchase from registered pharmacists.

        • Anonymous

          We need to regulate crazy folks, not guns.

    • Anonymous

      In Maine you don’t have to register a gun and its legal to sell and buy guns through Uncle Henry’s where background checks and registrations rarely take place. So, it may not be that easy to track it unfortunately.

      • Anonymous

        That is interesting. I bought a shotgun in Maine about 10 years ago and the gun dealer made a phone call to check out my background. I assumed the shotgun was also registered at that point, but apparently not. I have the serial numbers of all my guns in my own computer database in the event I lose one or get it stolen.

        • Anonymous

          Many shotguns don’t have serial #s.

          • Bill Cat

            When I was younger, shotguns were cash and carry — didn’t even need to ask a name. An Ithaca and some double-aught buckshot? Coming right up…

          • Anonymous

            I purchased the majority of my guns in the 60’s when background checks were not required. I always wondered if I should register those guns, but from what I’ve learned from this thread I don’t need to. BTW, my 28 gauge shotgun does have a serial number on it.

          • Anonymous

            i think you will find if you bought the gun in the 60’s it was registered at time of purchase.

          • Anonymous

            But, how could they when the store that sold me the gun did not even ask for my name.

          • Anonymous

            What part of “Cash and carry” eludes you? I bought guns at Abacrombie Fitch on Fifth Avenue in New York City, and the clerk didn’t even ask my name. In those days handguns were illegal in New York without a permit, but long guns didn’t even have an age limit for purchase. You could ride around the city with the gun on your dashboard, and the ammo on the seat. No crime.

          • Anonymous

            “When I was younger, shotguns were cash and carry”

            And dinosaurs walked the earth and you dodged them as you walked to school, which was uphill both ways….

          • Bill Cat

            Don’t get too silly with yourself, Brookie.

          • Anonymous

            Sorry to inform you but its true, right up to the 90’s

          • Anonymous

            …and many antique guns have no serial number or a serial number which is totally useless as there is no record of it any longer.

        • Anonymous

          Yeah, most dealers will get your info and may register it with the ATF but usually a background check doesn’t include a registration to my knowledge but I’m not an expert. I do know that personal sales don’t include registrations (unless its something the buyer wants to do themselves but its not required legally.

          • Anonymous

            If you aren’t an “expert ” then don’t state as fact something that isn’t .

          • Anonymous

            Here is one of many sites I researched. I apologize for not being an expert but I am knowledgeable. http://crime.about.com/od/gunlawsbystate/a/gunlaws_me.htm

            A dealer does keep records, you are right about that but it isn’t necessarily “registered”. However, it is indeed legal to purchase a gun from a private sale and not required to be registered. I’m not saying I agree or disagree, just relaying what I have discovered. Also EPD themselves stated on their Facebook page before this article ever came out that they weren’t able to trace it and that registration is not required in this state.

            Not trying to argue, just trying to help some people with their questions.

      • Anonymous

        well i had to register MY gun when i bought it .You
        have to “register” those obtained LEGALLY.

        • Anonymous

          Not in Maine you do not have to register any gun. When you buy from a licensed gun dealer, you have to pass an FBI background check, that’s all. The dealer will keep the info in his records, which is only submitted to ATF upon request.

          • Anonymous

            well then that’s another law that needs changing .

        • Bright

          This is not true. You lose some ground when you go from trying to sound like a rational gun owner to someone who’s just acting the part. In Maine sales through FFL’s are tracked (or are trackable), just like nearly any item purchased today. As for legal private sales, there is no registration no forms nothing that goes tot eh State or feds to show who now is in possession of the firearm, and it’s legal so long as the buyer isn’t a prohibited individual. The last part kind of blows the whole thing away as there’s little in the way of proof to show, it’s almost a scare tactic hoping gun owners will keep track. This is one point I agree with you on, we should register all our firearms, those of us with no mal-intent should have no issues.

    • Anonymous

      Thanks to the NRA and their lobby, it is very difficult to track a gun. Basically, it is a manual process that starts with calling the manufacturer, find out who they shipped it to, call that person and see who they sold it to, so on and so forth.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/26/us/legislative-handcuffs-limit-atfs-ability-to-fight-gun-crime.html?ref=us

      • Anonymous

        Thanks for the link. it show the extent of the NRA’s and Congress’s compicity—- so basically they WANT the criminal to be able to have easy access to the guns ,just like I suspected…

        • Anonymous

          The NRA is an odd lot. All you hear from them is “Obama’s going to take our guns” when the reality is that in the last four years, gun rights have been expanded. They do stuff like get a bill passed which prevented the VA from providing mental health records to the FBI, meant to prevent veterans who might have mental issues from buying guns. Veteran’s have a right to have guns, even if they have mental issues. Then they turn around and tell us the problem is mentally ill people, not guns. Go figure.

          • Anonymous

            and then they scream and yell “just enforce the current laws, there are plenty on the books” BUT they forget to tell you the NRA gutted any laws worth enforcing —LIKE requirement to REGISTER your gun. Why would any law abiding person OBJECT to registering their gun?? I can think of plenty of reasons why CRIMINALS would object ,though . The NRA facilitating criminals NOT freedom.

          • Anonymous

            Oh, you mean like pushing through laws like Montana’s castle law which allows a homeowner to shoot someone in their yard? So, if you don’t like Joe, simply call him up, say something to upset him and when he shows up, boom, take him out in the driveway. The prosecutor can’t try the case but I guess that is what they mean by “enforce the laws on the books”…or at least until we can get around to having them gutted.

            But really, pf, don’t waste your breath. If a kid had found the gun and shot himself or someone else, all we would have heard is “oh, well, accidents happen. Next!” Gun violence, including mass killings, is part of life in America and it will never change, no matter how horrific or senseless.

          • Anonymous

            The NRA doesn’t represent the interests of individual members, it represents the interests of the weapons manufacturers. It uses fear as a tactic to squeeze $$ out of the individuals, to pay for the work they do for the manufacturers. It’s a good scam – and the individual members are too dim to get it.

          • Anonymous

            I could not have said it any better. Thank you.

  • Anonymous

    “loaded w/ one bullet in the chamber”

    As in it had a full mag AND a chambered round…or it was loaded w/ a single round in the chamber?

    One seems like a possible (multiple) homicide that was abandoned…the other a possible suicide that was abandoned.

    I’m honestly torn….would I prefer it if it was someone about to do bad who had a change of heart…or to I prefer it to be a “responsible” gun owner who just happened to leave his weapon behind in a store frequented by families?

    • Rocky4

      I would bet he went in to take a dump, took the gun from the
      holster, & forgot to re-secure after he did his business.

      • Anonymous

        Those are a bit heavy though. Wouldn’t they hear it hitting the floor?

        I want to hope its that sort of oversight…but thats one he-l of a mistake to make.

        • Rocky4

          Read it again. I’m saying…..he took the gun out of the holster
          sat it down, did his business and then forgot to resecure.
          I have done that many times……..never forgot the gun though.

          • Anonymous

            Ah by “resecure” I interpreted that as not putting it/the holster back on correctly, them standing up, it hitting the floor etc.

            I’ve never taken a dump w/ a gun on me. I assume its one of those “remove it or go fishing in the toilet for it” kinda deals?

          • Taking a dump with a gun…yeah that’s something I definitely need to add to my bucket list. :D

          • Anonymous

            You may need a loaded gun while on the “hopper”… One never knows who might interupt you…

          • “I said NO, I can’t spare a square, partner” BLAM

          • Anonymous

            you watch way too many movies

      • Anonymous

        I’d say, after he did his “paperwork”… he had a “memory dump”…just sayin’

        • Rocky4

          ;=) HA…………..Just like I said!!!

      • jerrymyx

        classy comment!!!

        • Rocky4

          Some people just have a problem with reality. ;/)

  • Anonymous

    Typical careless gun owner. Probably doesn’t even it locked appropriately in a safe at home.

    • WhiskeyTangoFoxtrot

      As opposed to an atypical careless gun owner?

    • Anonymous

      What good does the gun do if you lock it in a safe an some one enters your house when you are there ? Are you going to tell the person that brakes in to stay were they are while you go get the gun out of the safe ?

      • Anonymous

        Well, this guy wouldn’t even remember where he left it…

      • Anonymous

        Keeping weapons appropriately secured prevents many more bad things from happening than it hinders good uses. e.g. your son stealing weapons and blowing up a school.

      • Anonymous

        well it keeps the kids from being shot

    • Anonymous

      must be nice to be perfect

      • Anonymous

        As opposed to a senile old fart who leaves his gun behind?

      • Anonymous

        silly public for expecting GUN owners to be perfect with their gun or at least NOT to leave it behind in a PUBLIC bathroom in a BUSY store.YOUR attitude is why we NEED MORE gun control laws ..because people don’t have the common sense to do the RIGHT thing “on their own”.

        • Anonymous

          A law against forgetting, thats bound to work!

        • Anonymous

          That’s a very appropriate comment from someone called prettyfoolish! Short of outlawing all new gun sales and confiscating all 300 million or so in circulation, just what sort of law could prevent this from ever happening again? This individual was careless and irresponsible with his gun and HE should be restricted from carrying a gun, NOT further restrict guns in the hands of responsible individuals.

          • Anonymous

            I can think of several laws that could have prevented this , can’t you?? No guns in PUBLIC bathrooms?? No guns in retails store Holster you gun at ALL times, especially in a public bathroom etc,etc etc .

          • Anonymous

            LOL, so no guns in public bathrooms….do you propose that he leave it outside the bathroom door or ask someone to hold it for him when he feels the urge to relieve himself, or are you suggesting that those who carry weapons not be able to use the bathroom at all? When you gotta go, sometimes you’ve REALLY got to go, but somehow that doesn’t apply to those holding concealed carry permits? Perfect example why we don’t need people like you making new laws.

  • Anonymous

    Multiply the number of gun owners in the US by 1000, which is at least what the weapons’ manufacturers and their shills at the NRA are hoping for. Then multiply incidents like this by 1000. Tip of iceberg.

    • Ansel Hazen

      WOW that’s a lotta peeple poopin at LL Bean

  • Anonymous

    Silly people. Nothing to be scared of. There is no problem that can’t be solved by MORE guns! Don’t you listen to the NRA?

    • Bill Cat

      Now, see, if the kid who found the gun, just winged that old boy in the parking lot. ACK!

    • Anonymous

      They are right it isn’t guns that kill people but stuoid people.

      • Anonymous

        Ah yes. The stuoid people. The stuoids seem to have a lot of guns.

  • Anonymous

    “The chief said police hope the gun’s owner comes forward to claim his
    firearm, but said the man or woman may face a charge of reckless
    conduct.” So which restroom did they find it in, men’s or women’s?

    • Anonymous

      I believe the restroom at the Ellsworth LL Bean is one bathroom for both men and women, not 2 seperate restrooms.

  • Anonymous

    Ill take it! I could use a good gun,To protect my home.

  • Anonymous
    • Anonymous

      First we had to worry about old people leaving their blinker on forever, now this :(

      • Anonymous

        how about younger people leaving their blinker on forever, not stopping, speeding, dare I go on.

        • Anonymous

          Was a bit of a joke we’re all getting old we’re all dying…nothing anyone can do to stop it, might as well poke some fun and not take it so seriously.

          EDIT PS judging by the screen name I think I know you haha

  • Anonymous

    In other news a car was parked on an incline without the emergency brake set. The car could have rolled down the hill and hit a child.

    • Anonymous

      In other news, a child was sitting on an incline on a sled without parental supervision. It could have slid down the incline into the path of a truck carrying nuclear tipped ICBM’s, launching them at Iran, triggering THE NUCLEAR HOLLYCOST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • Anonymous

        I KNOW! And the sled manufacturer would be fined and possibly put out of business if the nuclear holocaust wasn’t bad enough.

        • Bill Cat

          Gol dang it, nobody got SHOT on the way! What’s wrong with you guys? Can’t have a good hollycost without there’s some gun-play…

          • Anonymous

            I realize this was a serious thing but no one got hurt. The possibility that someone could’ve gotten hurt would’ve been HIS PROBLEM, no one else’s. That was the point I was trying to make.

          • Anonymous

            So if some six year old went into the bathroom and found the gun and discharged it through the wall and it hit somebody in the neck, that would be nobody’s problem but the man who left the gun in the bathroom?

          • Anonymous

            Split hairs. His responsibility. Just like if you serve alcohol to a minor and they go out and drive and get killed. It isn’t the Chevrolet dealership’s fault.

          • Bill Cat

            No real need to what-if it to pieces just for dramatic effect. Yeah, what if old Elmer there forgot the gun home on his bureau — wouldn’t have much to what-if about all that. =) So if my grandfather went in there, thought he was back at the invasion of Okinawa and grabbed that piece.

        • Anonymous

          Good luck with that. Most sleds are made in China.

    • Anonymous

      One child? It could’ve been a whole family walking their dog.

    • I lived in San Francisco for three years, and in fact cars do wander off on their own. You learn to “curb your wheels” and not rely on the brakes – in fact, it’s the law there.

    • Anonymous

      Not quite the same thing. You honestly believe that those two incidents are similar? Has our society gone so bad that someone needs to carry a loaded gun around in LL Beans? I’m sorry, but “forgetting” a loaded gun is extremely irresponsible.

    • Anonymous

      Off topic.

  • Anonymous

    Another irresponsible gun owner………

  • Anonymous

    A potential charge of reckless conduct. Now, what if someone such as a child played with gun and shot someone.———–would the charge be the same?

  • Anonymous

    Oh yeah….”retailer and simply forgot the weapon when he left, according to Ellsworth Police Lt. Harold Page”… And, if a child “simply” picked up the gun and shot himself, what would be the doctor’s excuse? Or, prescription? Sorry, Doc, you are irresponsible, next stop, JAIL!

    • Anonymous

      If jail is the next stop for being irresponsible, we’d better get building!

      • Anonymous

        some irresponsibiolities are more serious them others.THIS is a serious one.

        • Anonymous

          I agree that it was a serious level of irresponsibility when this guy left his gun behind where someone else could get their hands on it. But I wouldn’t call it any more irresponsible than the young lady who was texting as she was driving along 1A, didn’t notice that she had veered into the breakdown lane, and almost took off my front bumper as I was waiting for a break in traffic to turn onto that road. In both cases it’s the irresponsible person whose behavior needs to change, not the gun or car or cell phone that was treated carelessly, and not other drivers or gun owners or texters who have never endangered anyone.

          • Anonymous

            yup and it’s the owner not the gun who will go to jail

      • Bright

        People who drink and drive or speed are irresponsible, those who text and drive, same thing. I think the case is pretty clear that with the right to carry you must always be cognizant of the safety of your firearm at all times or give up that right.

  • Davida Willette

    look at his age. they shouldnt have charged him.no harm was done this time becaause of his age they simply should not allow him to use guns in this facility

    • Anonymous

      Either we’re going to have laws against age discrimination or we aren’t. Just because someone is “old” doesn’t mean he’s entitled to be criminally stupid.

      • Anonymous

        Forgetfulness is not a crime.

        • Anonymous

          It should be when you forget a firearm. Rights carry responsibilities.

        • Anonymous

          being negligent with your gun is.

    • Anonymous

      Do you have children? Grandchildren? Would you be saying the same thing if someone had walked into that bathroom, grabbed the gun and killed one of them? I’m doubtful

      • Anonymous

        That would have been a tragedy, but remember, guns don’t kill people.

        • Anonymous

          stupid people do … which is why we have laws with penalties to discourage them from doing stupid things.

          • Anonymous

            I believe you’ve fallen into the sar-chasm.

        • Bright

          One might look at the stats to see how often a child in the US gets behind the wheel of a vehicle that has not been properly secured, I’ll bet it happens far more often than you’d like to admit Utopian.

      • Anonymous

        It’s always about the children, right?

        • Anonymous

          It’s about any innocent lives, but people who have children are just usually able to put these types of things in perspective a bit more of they use their children as examples

          • Anonymous

            Where are the parents? Some people act as though children grow up in a void.

          • Anonymous

            where was this guys “parents’ ??

        • Bright

          While I understand to a point your issue, I cannot see arguing against enforcing responsible conduct with regard to concealed carry.

    • Anonymous

      His age is irrelevant. But 17-A MRSA, Sect. 35 is. Absent a conscious decision to leave the gun behind, there’s no case for charging him. Hopefully the DA realizes this.

      • Anonymous

        so the actual law about liability I posted above .nicce try ryan ;but no cigar .

    • This Charming Man

      He shouldn’t be practicing medicine, particularly on people that don’t have any other options !

      • Bright

        Good luck getting many docs to sign up for that vacancy.

    • Anonymous

      do you have a clue why we have laws?? because of stupid people.Stupid people need to have consequences for their stupid actions so they won’t do it again. HELLO.

    • Bright

      So had he not left the gun he still should have been told due to his age he shouldn’t be allowed to carry legally? I believe that might be age discrimination. A female school employee had a gun in her purse at a school last year, should we say women are not allowed to carry firearms?

  • StuckinNorthCarolinaMainer

    Lots of strange people work at that jail. Lets see, a Sgt. who beats himself up in order to take a vacation, two staff that steal funds for years, now a doctor who carries a weapon and leave it loaded in a public where a kid or anyone else could access it, a retired military guy at that. I have always respected the Sheriff of Washington County, he should get a handle on the staff he has on board.Don’t get me wrong, I am not a gun hater. I am a proponent of responsible gun ownership. Pinching a loaf and leaving your loaded piece behind is not responsible.

    • This Charming Man

      Ayah, it’s a freak show thar !

      • Anonymous

        It’s so far away from anything that only the nutcases make the entire trip without turning around and giving up.

  • Anonymous

    Wow, wonder how many prostate exams the doc does ……??????????????

  • Xerxies

    It’s unfortunate that it appears DeLeo elected to exercise his discretion in this matter by pandering to the liberal anti-gun hysteria we’re currently experiencing. The purpose of charging someone with a crime is to protect the public & prevent ongoing criminal activity. Can anyone tell me how charging Dr. Newman is doing either?

    All to often we as Police Officer’s forget, that we are public servants, that our purpose is not to punish offenders, but to protect the public from them, using the tools the State has provided, in the form of criminal law and powers of arrest. Dr. Newman made a mistake, one that could have resulted in tragedy, but we don’t live in a world of “what if’s”.

    No tragedy occurred, the gun was secured in Police custody, and the owner was identified. Now, if Dr. Newman had a poor attitude, i.e. refused to accept the potential harm his inattention could have caused, then charging him would be appropriate. But, him being a medical doctor, in his 70’s and employed in the criminal justice system, I find it unlikely that he did not immediately recognize the gravity of his mistake.

    A warning with an old fashion ass chewing would have been more appropriate in the case. I would not be surprised if the DA, or the courts agree with my point of view and administer such, without a criminal conviction…

  • Anonymous

    Are you kidding? This is supposed to pass the straight face test?

  • Barney kept his in his shirt pocket

    • Anonymous

      what does that even mean??

  • When deciding to charge a person with a crime the question of intent comes into play. Im sure that this man had no intent to create harm and that he simply forgot that he had left his weapon behind. However I believe that in this case there is a “higher standard” that must be applied. Guns are not wallets, or sunglasses or baseball caps. There has to be a higher level of attention on the part of people who carry weapons in this manner. The article does not say if this man had a concealed weapons permit but there is a mention of a holster which makes me believe that he likely was carrying the weapon concealed. My opinion is that he has demonstrated that he is no longer capable of properly being responsible for his firearm. I personally believe that no one gets to make even one mistake with a firearm. I am not anti-gun at all, just someone who thinks that owning a gun requires and demands a high level of responsibility.

    • Anonymous

      As a gun owner, I agree with you 100%. Gun owners should be held completely responsible and have severe penalties for being so irresponsible. Like you said, it’s not a wallet or a pair of sunglasses. It’s a deadly weapon!

      • Anonymous

        So is a car.

        • Anonymous

          “So is a car.” Which we are required to register three ways from Wednesday.

        • Anonymous

          Agreed!

        • Anonymous

          False equivalence. A car is a deadly weapon when used incorrectly. A gun is a deadly weapon when used correctly.

          • Anonymous

            There’s your fallacy right there. A gun isn’t correctly used to kill someone unless you are a criminal. Non-criminals have other uses for a gun.

        • Anonymous

          and yet it’s purpose isn’t TO kill.

          • Bright

            I’m not sure that matters as no inanimate objects have intentions. A firearm can exist sole for the purposes of target shooting in the possession of a particular owner. It is the human that utilizes the device that makes it deadly, whether it’s guns, cars or a can of gasoline. We charge people all the time with similar charges regarding their “use” of motor vehicles. Imprudent speed, our new “distracted driving laws”, OUI and related charges.

          • Anonymous

            A car is a transportation machine. A gun is a killing machine. The difference in purpose for these tools negates your justification tapdance.

          • Bright

            Maybe in the land of rainbows and unicorn, but here in reality tons of people die at the hands of drunk or irresponsible drivers too, in a clear misuse of the object their operating. My guns are far less likely to cause injury than my vehicle, and I have a blemish free driving record.

          • Anonymous

            If someone ever threatens my life and the car is the only thing I have to defend myself, I will run them right over. Count on it.

        • Anonymous

          You’re veering off topic, intentionally, Mr/Mrs Diversion.

          • Anonymous

            Diversion cop again.

    • Anonymous

      First, you’re right — the story doesn’t mention whether the man has a concealed weapons permit. Sadly, this shows the decline of the paper’s quality. Should we assume he does because he wasn’t charged with carrying a concealed weapon without a permit? No, because the police may have used discretion and not issued a summons for that, or there wasn’t enough evidence that the man carried the gun in a concealed manner.

      Now, as for elements of a crime, I hope this man fights the summons or that the district attorney or judge actually reads the law in question.

      Maine law states that for conduct to be criminally reckless, the accused must have “consciously disregard[ed]” risk to others. The conduct in question is that he left the gun behind. There seems to be little, if any, evidence the man left the gun behind consciously. Therefore, no crime.
      Whether he should continue to have a permit to carry a concealed gun, if he indeed has one, is another story. Regardless, this one is a streeeeeeettttccchhhh for criminal conduct.

      • Please provide a link to the statute. Tx

        • Anonymous
          • Anonymous

            you weren’t being totally honest. I’d say he could be charged under numerously levels of liability .The law says:
            1. “Intentionally.”.
            A person acts intentionally with respect to a result of the person’s
            conduct when it is the person’s conscious object to cause such a result. [2007, c. 173, §8 (AMD).]…

            2. “Knowingly.”A.
            A person acts knowingly with respect to a result of the person’s
            conduct when the person is aware that it is practically certain that the
            person’s conduct will cause such a result. [2007, c. 173, §8 (AMD).]…
            3. “Recklessly.”A.
            A person acts recklessly with respect to a result of the person’s
            conduct when the person consciously disregards a risk that the person’s
            conduct will cause such a result. [2007, c. 173, §8 (AMD).]…

            4. “Criminal negligence.”
            A.
            A person acts with criminal negligence with respect to a result of the
            person’s conduct when the person fails to be aware of a risk that the
            person’s conduct will cause such a result. [2007, c. 173, §8 (AMD).]B….

            .
            For purposes of this subsection, the failure to be aware of the risk,
            when viewed in light of the nature and purpose of the
            person’s conduct and the circumstances known to the
            person, must involve a gross deviation from the standard of conduct that
            a reasonable and prudent person would observe in the same
            situation. [2007, c. 173, §8 (AMD).][…

            5. “Culpable.”
            A person acts culpably when the person acts with the
            intention, knowledge, recklessness or criminal negligence as is
            required….[

            weird you look to find a way to clear him of charges and responsibility. and “normalize” leavijng a gun in a bathroom

          • Anonymous

            He is being accused of reckless conduct. Reckless conduct requires that the conduct be “conscious.” There is no evidence that the man intentionally left the gun behind. That’s the conduct in question. Do stay on point.

          • Anonymous

            Stay on point? That’s REALLY funny coming from a guy who is trying to obscure the discussion by bringing drunk driving into it.

          • Anonymous

            i’m totally ON point and gave your post some meat to it

      • Anonymous

        I call baloney on you and trying to justify careless behavior

        • Anonymous

          Where do I try to “justify” careless behavior?
          The law for reckless conduct requires the conduct to be deliberate. Where is the evidence that the man deliberately left the gun behind?

          • Bright

            Intent should not matter. As a responsible person with a carry permit (Assuming he has one) the onus must be with the carrier to ensure the safety of your firearm at all times. If you cannot be counted on to maintain the safety of all with regard to you guns you should not be allowed to carry. If the charge doesn’t stick due to intent, then there should be a serious charge that does, lest the rest of us responsible people lose all our carry rights for the sins of a few.

          • Anonymous

            “Intent” to commit an act is the heart of criminal law. Without it, no law has been broken.
            The issue of whether the man should be allowed to continue to carry a concealed weapon (again, the story doesn’t say whether he has a permit) is separate.

          • Bright

            Please explain how people are charged criminally for drinking and driving offenses?

          • Anonymous

            Did someone pour the booze down their throats? Did someone force them to get in their cars and drive? They ELECTED to drink and drive, so they are charged if they pass a arbitrary limit set by law. Some States .10. some .08, and I believe one is .06.

          • Bright

            This man chose to neglect his duty as a firearm owner/carrier. The point is that most drunk drivers do not INTEND on killing innocent people, but they still do. Cause and affect.

          • Anonymous

            They are not charged with killing someone unless they did. the CRIME is driving while drunk, and unless someone forced them to drink and drive. they are culpable.

          • Rocky4

            .04 if you have a CDL in Maine.
            That 54 Chev is not mine. I had a 4dr but it’s gone

          • Anonymous

            We’re talking about guns, not drinking and driving, Mr. Diversion.

          • Bright

            So intent is only requisite in the cases of firearms? The statement was that one must prove intent to charge someone with reckless conduct or a criminal act, while other laws clearly show this is not the case. This is by no means diversion, it’s reasonable for us to compare and contrast laws and how they apply to all of us. But of course you want a very narrow view to match your mind it appears.

          • Anonymous

            And bingo, another diversion. When accused of diverting the topic, you accuse me of being narrow minded. Methinks you’ve got a case of projection, Mr. Not So.

          • Anonymous

            of course “intent” doesn’t matter. I don’tl care if her intended to leave it or NOT.. The fact is he did.

    • Anonymous

      “When deciding to charge a person with a crime the question of intent comes into play.” that is total baloney .INTENT has nothing to do with the law . the law is the law…”Oh officer i accidentally ran that red light “…yeah right!!!”OH officer i accidentally left that gun behind and a kid/criminal got a hold of it and shot someone accidentally'” I don’t think that would ‘cut it’.

  • Anonymous

    If everyone had guns we wouldn’t have to nitpick over these situations..LOL….I mean what kind of “man” has to carry a gun…

  • Anonymous

    Hold gun owners RESPONSIBLE!! Make an example out of this guy and let us responsible citizens carry guns! If we lose our sense of responsibility as gun owners, we should pay!

    • Bright

      Bingo!

  • Bill Cat

    72 yeas old, one in the chamber and too senile to remember it in a public restroom. Somehow, that’s not very reassuring. And he drove there too. AAARRGGGHHH!!!

    • Anonymous

      He has a lot on his mind and he isn’t senile. He should not have left it in the bathroom, loaded (or not). He drove there because he can drive and has a license, unless you feel that at 72 you have to give that up. DMV is pretty strick where that goes…they have to have forms filled out. Let me know how that works for you at that age if you are capable. He will go thru due process for his mistake.

      • Bill Cat

        Nah, give up the drivers license when the eye sight and reflexes are gone. One time had to pick up an old fella off the parking lot, he assured me he only passed out while standing-up and was fine in his car. Didn’t want to hear a word from the store manager about having a stock clerk drive him home, and then just drove off… I followed him at a respectful distance and he made it home okay

        Not even on the same page as a gun in the restroom, but I think maybe the old boy should be embarrassed enough to just leave it home or turn it in…

  • Anonymous

    I can see leaving a cell phone there, but your handgun? That’s a bit different!

  • Anonymous

    I can see leaving a cell phone there, but your handgun? That’s a bit different!

  • Anonymous

    Why didn’t they charge him with reckless conduct with a firearm? Call an ace an ace.

    • Anonymous

      I think you will find the charge is appropriate and would read in the complaint…”reckless conduct to wit a firearm” or some similar wording.

  • Superuser23

    While people are stating the elderly shouldn’t be driving, meanwhile they are carrying guns! People think the elderly should be off the road….I think we need to make sure they don’t have a gun first.

    • Anonymous

      O.K. I’ll bite; Let us say (for argument’s sake) that in this case “elderly” is age 65. So how many “elderly” people have used a gun to mow down elementary school children? How many have killed their spouse in anger? All in all give me a number of deaths over the last year due to old folks possessing guns.

      • Superuser23

        It has nothing to do with how many spouses they killed, how many schools they stormed into. They can’t even take care of a gun, all it needed to do was get in the wrong hands. If you can’t keep track of a gun, you may as well give it up.

        • Anonymous

          Oh this is about violating their Second, forth and Fifth amendment rights on the basis of what their class might do?

          Sorry, I don’t think that argument is going to gain much support.

          • Superuser23

            I could care less if it gains any support, I am not petitioning for any, but I sure the he*l don’t want someone to have a gun if they can’t keep track of it, right or no right.
            I bet you and several others would have a different spin on this story if the gun got in the wrong hands.

  • Anonymous

    All you people never make a mistake, and are horrified at seeing a gun! My inside the pants holster requires me to put it somewhere… Why would you remember a gun if you’d forget your jacket? You wouldn’t want to forget either and don’t say your perfect and never forget anything!

    • JohnR

      Compensate much?

      “My inside the pants holster requires me to put it somewhere”….

      Is that a gun in your pants or are you just happy to see me?………….ROFLMAO! Something we all know about those that “feel” the need to do their Walter Mitty ditty.

    • Anonymous

      I’ve never known a jacket to kill someone. We have laws with consequences so people WILL remember the important things –like not leaving your gun in a public place .

      • Anonymous

        The funny thing is that the plastic bags in which that the jacket comes back from the cleaner kills many children. But no one suggests they be outlawed. No one would get arrested for leaving one behind in a restroom.

        BTW the “punishment for mistakes” system works so well that hardly anyone makes a mistake anymore.

        • Anonymous

          What do you think LAWS are all about ? What do you think their purpose is?? whether it be laws in the home called “rules” or the 10 commandments?? You are surrounded by laws and rules because some people don’t use the good sense GOD gave them , voluntarily.
          Most criminal hate following the rules—that is why they are in JAIL!!

  • Anonymous

    I don’t know why people are so worried. Guns don’t kill people, remember? Only people kill people! So phew, nothing to worry about.

  • Anonymous

    …”simply forgot the weapon”, I’d say it’s time Dr.Newman hung up his holster, at home.

    • Google “guns left in bathrooms” and see how often it happens.

      • Anonymous

        Yes, apparently so.

      • Anonymous

        So, anything that happens alot should be legal? That pedophilia stuff happens all the time, might as well just ignore it….

      • Anonymous

        so are you trying to prove alot of people shouldn’t own guns ? we already know that .

  • We all know that horrible things happen all the time, but there has clearly been an uptick in gun-related incidents and crimes in the public sphere in the last dozen years or so, and especially this year. This particular incident — while relatively uneventful — unfortunately unfolds after a nauseating list of traumatic shootings: the Columbine school shootings, the D.C. sniper attacks, the Virginia Tech. killings, the Tuscon assassination attempt, the Aurora theater massacre, the Portland (OR) mall killings, the Newtown elementary school tragedy, the Tillamook (OR) incident where kids found a loaded gun in a theater, the Frankstown Township (PA) highway killings, and the Webster (NY) madman shootings and fires. Sadly, the last five of these events have all occurred this December, and now we have Maine to add to the list. (It’s equally disturbing that conversations about shootings take place without much mention that these killers are always men: there appears to be an ostensible connection between masculinity and public violence, as if our culture hadn’t demonstrated as much already.) Thank goodness this man’s negligence didn’t cause any injuries or deaths. Remember that little Mayan doomsday that “didn’t happen”? Public places and spaces — like highways, schools, political gatherings, theaters, parking lots, malls, and stores — are increasingly unsafe. These are the social transformations one might call apocalyptic. It’s not the ending of something, but the revealing of something: humans’ self-destructive nature. Can’t we all put our death devices away, for crying out loud?

    • Anonymous

      The violent crime index (at the department of justice) reports that violent crime has fallen dramatically over the past 15 years.

      Your “perception” of increased violence is fed by media reports of incidents that feed that view.

      Mass killings by gun wielding nuts are a statistically insignificant number of US deaths. less than .00007%

  • Anonymous

    Has anyone here thought of the obvious? Parents should be accompanying their children to the restroom these days. There could be any number of hazards in a bathroom. Also, they should be describing the dangers of these hazards to children, ie a gun is never a toy, get an adult if you find a hidden one while playing or see one lying out in the open anywhere.

    • Bright

      Teenagers should be pretty safe to use a bathroom on their own, but we cannot discount their lack of judgement as to seeing a “free” gun there? This is just pure irresponsibility.

    • Anonymous

      did you think of the obvious?The guy shouldn’t have left the gun in a PUBLIC bathroom??Odd how the right can blame everyone else and take NO personal responsibility.

  • trisailer

    We are never going to address this issue of guns until we make gun manufacturers and owners responsible for the damage that guns cause. It is way past time to stand up to the NRA and say enough is enough.

    The simple solution is to place a tax on guns that covers the cost of damage caused by guns. Start with the $100 billion cost of guns to the society. There’s 260 million guns in the US so that’s about $4,000 per gun per year. More for assault type weapons and handguns, less for long guns.

    From there credits can be given for levels of training and secured storage. Let gun owners pay for their desire to own guns and the problem will go away. The second amendment can stay intact.

    I spent 3 years in the Army. After basic training I never saw my M-14 except to clean it a couple of times a year and I never saw any ammo for it. Why do you suppose the US military does not permit trained soldiers to keep weapons unless they are in combat?

    • Anonymous

      The answer to that question is that they are afraid of you so they disarm you.

      • Anonymous

        You wish…

    • Bright

      Yes, we should do this on cars, cigarettes and alcohol too right?

      • Anonymous

        and heavy cream, cake, pie, and computers.

      • Anonymous

        we already do…

        • Bright

          Maybe the “tax the heck out” of it theory doesn’t work then?

    • Anonymous

      time to tax the heck out of ammo.

      • Anonymous

        Yes, then only the “rich” drug running criminals who make the big bucks on the street and sleezy underworld characters can afford to buy it…wait, what am I saying…they can just threaten people to give them the ammo.

  • Anonymous

    People make mistakes. Fortunately , nobody was hurt. Obviously some of the commenter’s are not close to 70. I am sure that the system will decide what the proper action to take will be. Don’t tear this guy up. I am sure he is having enough trouble as it is. Remember what happened to the nurse in England that gave the radio show hosts info about Kate Middleton.

    • Anonymous

      Keep that in mind as you criticize the next “Target ” rush tell you to pile on

  • Anonymous

    “served as the senior medical officer on the USS Bataan, which deployed to Afghanistan after the 9/11 terrorist attacks” …

    Note to BDN – last time I checked my world map Afghanistan was a land-locked country without any sea … but it’s simply amazing what a Navy can do these days.

    I wonder whether the Swiss Navy are still recruiting these day?

    • Bright

      One might assume they deployed to the region in support of operation in Afghanistan?

      • Anonymous

        One might ass-u-me that, but isn’t it the reporters job to explain?

    • Maybe he was attached to a Marine unit.

  • Anonymous

    another reason why some people shouldn’t have or carry a gun.and why did he NEED to take the gun off an put it down?? Did he think he was at home??

    • He wasn’t thinking. That’s the problem. He should never be allowed to take a firearm off his property under any circumstances. Actually this should be greater than a class D misdemeanor.

  • Anonymous

    The scariest thing about living in the US today is that so many people are so frightened that they feel that they have to be packing a loaded weapon.

    Maybe it’s because we’re such an obese and lazy culture.

    Glad it wasn’t my kid next in that changing room. This ought to be treated seriously.

    • Anonymous

      maybe because we lost our problem solving skills and ability to “get along”.Just reported: two vets getting into a fracas over a BUMPER sticker One took a GUN to the head of the other.. OVER a freaking bumper sticker the police arrived …I think there is one dead vet .

  • Bright

    This is exactly how responsibility must be enforced upon gun owners, We have a responsibility to ensure the safety of our firearms at all times. Being nonchalant to the point that you’d forget and leave a gun in a public place, even in your own bathroom for that matter shows a lackadaisical approach toward ensuring firearms safety. He should lose his carry permit and firearm in my view.

    • Anonymous

      ENFORCE the law..

      • Bright

        Agreed.

  • Anonymous

    Hey stop giving the ‘ol guy the business. I went to the doctor the other day to get my eyes checked and he handed me a gun and said,” alright, I want you to put a shot right through the middle of that O on the eye chart! “

  • Anonymous

    isnt he the guy people pay money to for a medical marajinna card??

  • Lord Whiteman

    Even a man as smart as this guy makes this dangerous mistake,and yet the NRA demands we give a concealed weapons permit to any moron who wants one..

  • Briney

    Would “simply forgetting it” hold up, if he had left it in a jail cell?

    Simply another case of a Weapon being in the wrong hands. A doctor, no less.

    Wonder if he had the safety on? Where does he put it at night? In his pajamas? His nightshirt? Or, under the pillow? Is the Weapon always loaded? It is a Weapon – not a toy. Made to Kill.

  • Anonymous

    I think we are losing perspective here. Why shouldn’t he be charged for reckless conduct? Earlier someone compared it to forgetting to set the parking brake of a car on an incline. Well, wouldn’t it make sense to charge them for reckless conduct? I understand gun control is a very touchy subject at the moment but we do have some laws and I think it is appropriate he was charged with reckless conduct.

    • Anonymous

      I believe in the right to have guns but I also feel he should have been charged not only with reckless conduct but reckless conduct with a firearm. Even though it was a mistake he was reckless with a firearm, period!

      • Anonymous

        You are right. I didn’t know there was a law that included “with a firearm”. My bad.

  • Anonymous

    Extremely irresponsible.
    Glad to hear that someone responsible made the right decision with turning it over, and tomorrow I will not be reading about a crime committed with someones forgotten firearm.
    Curious to know if his weapon was returned.

  • Anonymous

    I would LOVE to have that gun! AND,I would not leave it in a public place…

  • Anonymous

    As an NRA Safety Instructor I emphasize to all whom I train in my Handgun Safety Courses that the overwhelming number of what are called “firearm accidents” are in fact “firearm incidents” where precautions were not followed, safety rules ignored, and poor judgements excercised. This is clearly the case in this scenario. Regardless of intent, the knowledge of your firearms’ location, it’s state of readiness, and its security are of utmost importance and a crucial component of “carrying concealed”. The “incident” which was created through a direct violation of the above tenets resulted in no damage but had the potential to wreek carnage among the most un suspecting. The degree of sactions imposed upon the individual needs to be sorted by wise minds, balancing the right of this individual to carry safely, the degree of risk created by unacceptable procedures, and the likelehood of additional transgressions. Any actions taken do not reflect upon any broadened scoped policies or mandates any more than any other act of ommission cries for revision. It’s a singular case whose legal conclusions and ramifications should reflect solely upon the individual involved and provide the most appropriate levels of protection offerred for both the owner of the firearm and the community of which he is a respected member. Ken Fogelman

    • Bright

      Well said.

    • Anonymous

      and a lesson learned by all IF they are willing to learn it ….

  • anonme 527

    Not sure what’s worse, irresponsible gun ownership or the thought of a 72 yr. old man wearing one of those Aspen-style bean jackets that makes people look like the Michelin man.

  • Anonymous

    The most researched they did on him was a jail doctor. LOL!!! The Man served in the military for over 40 years and he is a jail doctor.. Right. Google him

  • Downeasta

    Nice to know the police will file charges against those whom carry and forget.

  • WACO118

    Why would a 72 year old doctor Need to be a deputy in Washington County? Better yet why would any Sheriff authorize him to be a deputy? And the commissioners went along with that auction.? Where is the common sense that most Sheriffs have?. Maybe that is the deputy the sheriff has sent out to get Leigh when he is stocking the citizens of Washington County. Or maybe that is the one that hangs out in the admin office for hours ,Oh, know he is the supervisor of dispatch.

    • Bright

      I think you’ll find each jail has a Doctor who is responsible for the medical needs of routine “prisoners” and as such is so affiliated to ensure they receive the proper medications and are sent to the ER when necessary, but not unnecessarily.

  • MIKE SHERWOOD

    simply forgot it..if you think that means much ..your trippin….your gun is part of you ..you always ck your piece..man your lucky some kid didnt find it…you dont deserve to carry a weapon…your permit should be revoked…

  • Perhaps like you, I count on the BDN for my first laugh of the day. Here it is:

    “Benjamin Newman told police he took the gun — a 9 mm Walther police pistol — out of its holster while he used the bathroom at the outdoor apparel retailer and simply forgot the weapon when he left, according to Ellsworth police Lt. Harold Page.”

    Good thing Michael Corleone didn’t find it.

    The humble Farmer

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