Son of accused Kennebunk prostitute to live with father

Alexis S. Wright
Alexis S. Wright
Posted Dec. 14, 2012, at 9:01 a.m.
Last modified Dec. 14, 2012, at 9:56 a.m.

LEWISTON, Maine — Alexis Wright, the woman charged in connection with the Kennebunk prostitution investigation, and the father of her 7-year-old son have reached a custody agreement under which the boy will be staying with his father.

Benjamin Hopkins, the father of Wright’s child, filed for primary custody in late October. In a hearing held in Lewiston family court Thursday, and closed to the public, Hopkins’ attorney Dana Prescott said the couple worked out an agreement under which their son will stay with Hopkins with opportunities to also have time with his mother.

“They really, to their credit, under these very difficult circumstances, they really did put their son first,” Prescott said. “Neither one of these parents have lost sight of their son.”

Prescott said the details of the agreement and hearing are under seal by the judge. He said the agreement will be in place as Wright’s legal case continues.

Wright, 29, of Wells, is charged with 106 counts including prostitution, tax evasion and invasion of privacy.

In court paperwork Hopkins filed seeking primary custody, he cited the media attention her case has received, as well as four “inappropriate pictures” of his son and Wright, allegedly taken off the camera of Mark Strong, the 57-year-old Thomaston man charged with 59 counts, including promoting prostitution and invasion of privacy.

Police say Strong was Wright’s partner in crime and that the two ran a prostitution operation out of Wright’s former Pura Vida Studio and a nearby office space in Kennebunk for more than a year and a half, conspiring to film her sexual encounters with clients without their knowledge.

Describing the pictures found on Strong’s camera, Hopkins says, “My son appeared naked covered from the waist down with only a sheet. Alexis was fully naked rubbed up against my son.”

Prescott said Thursday that conditions have been placed for the family, including a guardian ad litem who will have access to information needed to benefit and support the child.

“We put some pieces in place for the family,” he said. “The parents really did a very effective job. It took some willingness to put their child ahead. If something doesn’t work or needs to be changed, we’ll handle that too.”

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