September 20, 2017
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Comments for: Husband in Alton murder-suicide was evaluated at Acadia Hospital two days before deaths

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  • Givrsum

    headline should be different! not much info to back it up..

  • Anonymous

    Yikes – concerning that this wasn’t caught during that evaluation.

    • Anonymous

      Surprised?

    • Anonymous

      Acadia Hospital should have kept him over night for observations, not just done a half fast evaluation, or if the hospital was going to release him the sheriff’s office should have arrested him, even though she didn’t want to press charges the sheriffs dept should have to step in and press charges.

      • Anonymous

        So you’re a doctor now huh? Must be nice to sit back and blame Acadia. How about the coward that killed his ex wife?

        • Anonymous

          If the place doesn’t exist to prevent suicides and murders, what exactly is the point of it?

          • Dixie Recked

            Bangorian you are 100% right!! The purpose of Acadia is to prevent these tragedies. Better not close DDPC quite yet.

          • Anonymous

            You can’t always predict someone’s intent. And a lot of people have thought about suicide but wouldn’t actually DO it. I’ll bet there are a ton of people out there who at one point in time has thought “I’d be better off dead” because their lives just sucked at that particular moment, but wouldn’t actually ever take their own life. We don’t know the extent of his conversation with the staff at Acadia, and if he didn’t say anything that indicated he was in immediate danger they can’t just mandate admission.

          • Anonymous

            Not everyone at Acadia is suicidal/homicidal.

          • Anonymous

            Mental hospitals don’t exist to prevent murders. They are not prisons.

        • Dixie Recked

          Have you no common sense? Nurse Gilligan should have been on top of this situation

      • Anonymous

        Clearly they should have kept him. I don’t personally fault them but it is frustrating that with no insurance he was out the same day. With Maine Care, they’d keep him a week. With private insurance he’d stay two weeks to a month.

        • Anonymous

          Insurance has nothing to do with the disposition of evals. Bed availability, severity of symptoms, intent of patient, means to act, and reliability of the information presented are considered.. If there are no beds and the intent is likely, the ER can hold a patient until a bed is available.

          • Anonymous

            Insurance does and i have seen hundreds of examples of it. Beds wasn’t the problem, he was already there. Do you think the severity and intent was sufficient? How about the reliability of the cops that brought him in. How about the Acadia employee that evaluated him at EMMC?

          • Anonymous

            I think you have misunderstood and I’m not trying to get into a finger pointing debate. Being in the building whether it be for an eval or participation in a program such as IOP or partial does not mean you qualify for admission. Reliability of the patient’s presentation is considered. The cops do not determine criteria for admission. Their information is taken into consideration but being brought in by the cops doesn’t mean automatic admission. If the employee felt there was intent to cause harm to self or others he wouldn’t have left the ER, insurance or not.

          • Anonymous

            how about when he got there he told them he wasn’t suicidal any more, because it might have interfered with his “plan”? He “faked’ it. to get out .

          • jerrymyx

            that HI caliber staff , is supposed to pick up on the signals that he was faking it…. that is part of their training, isn”t it?

          • Anonymous

            So why bother go in the first place, especially when there’s no guarantee you’ll be allowed to go home?

          • Anonymous

            severity of symptoms? intent of patent? means to act?……haven’t you read what Katie wrote? He was suicidal then…….Insurance has everything to do with it. You can make believe it’s not a problem…….until you have one. The man was suicidal, the cops were worried and a fellow patient has come forward confirming the same. And you are worried about symptoms, intent and means?????

    • Anonymous

      That what “wasn’t caught”? Just as we humans are horrible at determining whether someone is telling the truth, we are also horrible at predicting behavior. There simply is no training that can help anyone assess with any reliable accuracy what another human being will do.

      • Anonymous

        Well if that is the case Ryan, then these Psychologists that are charging tons of money per hour to treat us and help us through our behavior problems, should all be sued for malpractice, since they are obviously selling us a useless thing? Right??

        • Anonymous

          I think you have confused psychologists with psychics. (Of course, psychics don’t exist.)

          • I knew you would say that…

        • Anonymous

          Actually ryan is right. How is it guilty people pass lie-detector tests? People can be good actors.

  • Anonymous

    Eastern Maine Wealth Care strikes again. Treat ’em and street ’em.

    • Anonymous

      So blame the hospital not the person that killed her. A coward! Such as yourself for even making an accusation like this!

  • jerrymyx

    the Police did their job, Acadia did NOT!!!

    • Anonymous

      I wasn’t there BUT .. don’t know anyone involved…It’s easier to blame the hospital. How about this scenario; He told the police he was suicidal . The police appropriately brought him to the hospital , then he was transferred to another hospital . He told them he was ‘off his meds” ,was no longer suicidal, and would go back on his meds. to avoid future crisis. Since he was “on meds” he may have had prior contact with the facility. They believed him. He lied. He had a premeditated plan already in place , staying in the hospital , would interfere with that . so he ‘faked’ it. Heck ‘getting the meds” from his wife ( and calling her back form Portland to get them) appears to have all been part of the plan, too. Maybe telling the police he was suicidal and the hospital visit was a part of the plan too. Sounds like he was one calculating son of a gun to me….and a drama queen as well. .Sounds like he even “staged” the homicide scene. There is MUCH more to this story is my guess..

      • jerrymyx

        minutes ago

        That HI caliber staff , is supposed to pick up on the signals that he was faking it…. that is part of their training, isn”t it? my sister is a RN and she was taught how to recognize a faker, for God”s sake when she was in training in a phyc hospital for 6 months, and yet these Di=== A==== could NOT….

        • Anonymous

          Your sister was taught not how to recognize a “faker” but how to be more confident in her assessment. That’s not a good thing, by the way, because in most cases mental health professionals err on restricting a patient’s freedom.
          This is the same as law enforcement officers thinking they are better able to determine who’s lying and who’s not. The reality is, a “trained” person will be right about 50 percent of the time while anyone you pull off the street will be right about 50 percent of the time. Now, there was one study in which Secret Service agents were correct 58 percent of the time in determining whether someone was being truthful. But 58 percent accuracy is nothing to boast about. (Political polls generally use a 95 percent confidence interval, meaning that, statistically speaking, 95 percent of the time the poll’s results will be within the margin of error.)
          The real difference between an assessment of truthfulness by law enforcement (or a mental health care professional) and someone you randomly grab off the street is that the “trained” person will be more confident in his assessment than the random dude.

        • Anonymous

          Gail- If your sister in an RN she is not clinically qualified to diagnose someone as malingering (big word look it up.) She needs to have a Master’s Degree (psychiatric nurse practitioner) or a higher level of education to diagnose anyone and be licensed to do so…..and 6 whole whopping months of training in a psychiatric hospital and now she’s the expert….funny how it takes everyone else YEARS of psychiatric training to become licensed as an actual mental health provider. Try again Gail.

          • jerrymyx

            clearly after all the YEARS of training, It did NOT do this PT any good, now did it!! Mental health professionals(experts) lol err on restricting a patient’s freedom, only to have them released from care, too early; consequently they go out carry out dreadful actions to themselves and sometimes others!!. So don”t you dare lecture me, on so called EXPERTS and their years of education. I recently witnessed a person, who had just rec”d her MASTERS degree in SW, yelling and screaming LOUDLY, while bent forward, pointing her finger in an extremely violent/ aggressive manner at her neighbor; in the middle of the day, while her own small children. and the child of the person, the SW was verbally attacking; was in attendance witnessing this performance. I was inside my apt with doors and windows closed, and went outside to hear what the commotion was. Totally shocked at this SW”s behavior. I clearly informed her that I had witnessed her degree and years of education, NOT in action. This SW now works at Acadia. There are educated fools every station in life.

          • Anonymous

            Gail…. I wouldn’t bother to lecture you… as it would clearly be a waste of time and effort on my part and ignorance is bliss apparently on your part. But now we can all see your motive for your libelous attitude about Acadia….it’s really not about the hospital…it’s that you hate your neighbor who works there and who has an advanced degree that you clearly don’t have. Try again Gail -perhaps you may manage to convince someone that you actually know what you are talking about, but it won’t be anyone with any kind actual expertise in the mental health field. Speaking of fools. LOL.

          • jerrymyx

            I don”t hate my neighbor, (who has since moved) furthermore; I do NOT hate anybody!! I was trying to educate you! I do not have a libelous attitude towards Acadia, just some of the less knowledgeable fools who work there!! It that is applicable to you, so be it!! Resorting to name calling, and making personal attacks is so inherently childish, however stupidity has NO bounds. You clearly do not know how to debate an issue! Lesson for you, anyone who displays that type of behavior to another human being, clearly has an advanced case of mental illness, in my non degree opinion!!! You on the other hand seem to fit the same profile, “ordering” me to look something up in the dictionary. DARVO…. Would you not agree, you clearly have issues with CONTROL, in my way of thinking!! Take your comments to a play pen, as this will be my last reply, to someone who does not know, the meaning of the word debate!!, without feeling superior, using condescending comments/ attitude , to make yourself feel better about yourself !!..You give a new meaning to the word LOW! I do pity you. God Bless

          • Anonymous

            Gail Dauphinee-Martin you are hilariously uneducated. The only ‘issue’ I have is when someone speaks on a mental health subject that they have ZERO experience or knowledge of and try to come off sounding like they do. FACTS are not up for debate- hence they are FACTS not some ridiculous obtuse (look it up) opinion such as yours. And yes… clearly I am the one with the ‘control problem’ over your inane (look it up) uneducated rants about a subject you OBVIOUSLY know absolutely nothing about. Do play again Gail perhaps on a topic you may actually know about like coloring with dull crayons…… Cape Breton Business School what was that ? A 2 year school ? Clearly you are the expert in mental illness with a ‘business degree’ not someone who has a Ph.D. degree and who actually has a license to treat individuals who have a psychiatric illnesses….. Bahahahahahahahaha. And ‘god’ has nothing to do with this.

    • Dixie Recked

      Bring back David Proffitt!

  • Anonymous

    Such a sad and creepy story.my condolences go out to the families.Ive been wondering though. Why have there been no pictures released of the deceased since this story unfolded?

  • Jennifer Staples

    Interesting how he was stating that he was suicidal but yet they still released him

    • Dixie Recked

      Where was Nurse Gilligan when all this was going on?

    • MaineSkeptic

      Especially since he had been committed to Acadia back in May. I was there with him, and even then he said he was suicidal.

      • Anonymous

        Just because someone may have been suicidal in May doesn’t mean he was suicidal in November.
        Also, just a note: Be careful with the word “committed.” Very few people are ever “committed” to a mental hospital. A “committal” is a serious legal proceeding in which a hearing is held before a judge with both sides having an opportunity to present evidence. When someone is held at a hospital under emergency circumstances for a 72-hour period, that is not a committal. Nor is it a committal if someone voluntarily checks himself in and ends up staying for several weeks or months, even if the doctor “refuses” to allow the person to leave.

    • Anonymous

      It is kind of odd the track record of some of these mental health care pros are not to good. I’m thinking if my mental capacity is diminished that i would be thinking of taking my business elsewhere. Do you know the only person who’d wanna listen to this? A mental health
      professional. And that’s only because they get paid a hundred dollars an hour.

    • Anonymous

      Its because Acadia Hospital is crap and half the ‘workers’ there need a psych-eval themselves.

      • jerrymyx

        I SO agree….

  • Anonymous

    I don’t get the reporting of the friend who discovered the bodies? Not that she is involved or anything, but if McCausland says that she reported ” finding one of the three bodies” yet Scott Reed’s body was found “propped up on two pillows he had placed on the bodies of his wife and friend”……….someone explain to me how this lady who initially reported didn’t see the other bodies?, especially if Reed’s was “propped” upon them? According to this article and McCausland’s statements……the lady that reported (who was called by Reed ) should have found all of the bodies. But she only found “one of the three”? I think ole Steve McCausland needs to take a break. I think he is too busy explaining drunken troopers, cop shootings, and runaway former prosecutor’s to concentrate on what he is saying. I mean, they still don’t know if Reed shot his friend or not, but yet, he’s calling it a murder/ double suicide?

    • Anonymous

      the pillows “hid” the other bodies, therefore she did not see them.

      • Anonymous

        Really? I sort of figured that one out. I doubt that two pillows “hid” two bodies. It’s more that she only saw the one and got out of there. And since we’ve now surmised that this is what happened, why can’t McCausland say the same? That’s not my point; which is McCausland refuses to detail most of the stories regarding those items mentioned, yet he has absolutely no problem speculating on this one? They don’t even have the ballistics back, but he’s calling it a double suicide?

        • Anonymous

          Did you see him on Nancy Grace talking about Baby Ayla? Scary. Grace bit a hole in her tongue.

  • Anonymous

    Just one more example where this hospital is nothing more than a medication factory. They have proven time and time again that they are not capable of truly helping those in serious need of mental health needs.

    • Anonymous

      The examples of them helping those in serious need of mental health needs don’t get publicized. I’m guessing it happens more frequently than you think.

    • Anonymous

      You know what, It is not just the hospitals responsibility to help these people. Staff at these hospitals should not have to work harder than the patient for them to get well. It is up to the patient to use the tools the hospital gives them, they are responsible for their own health too. As for medications, that is only a part of the treatment provided to these patients and ultimately it is the hospitals job to stabilize the immediate crisis. We do not know the details surrounding this guys treatment and discharge, so to blame Acadia is quite premature. Patients have rights and hospitals need to abide by certain rules, some patients are more convincing than others. If he was discharged it’s because at that time he was considered not dangerous to himself or others. Some patients are quite manipulative and convincing, It is a fine line when it come to patient rights.

      • Anonymous

        Isnt it your JOB to know when a patient is being manipulative? I mean that is why many people go to Acadia, is to get Prozac, and many other drugs. If you are not able to tell when a patient is manipulative, then arent you basically just a drug dealer?
        Sorry but i have had a LOT of experience with Acadia. Mother in law in there for two weeks, came out more screwy than when she went in. Son in there Six times…Got six different evaluations and six different diagnosis for why he was addicted to drugs, had suicidal ideation and homicidal ideation. Sat there one day and watched my son throw a baseball so close to my head from 10 feet away that is he had better aim, i wouldnt be typing this post right now. He escaped from there three times and they did little more than wave goodbye. He and his crew in the juvenile ward would crush thier medications and then snort them.
        I understand if you think you are doing your best. Maybe its a lack of people at the top providing the people below with the training and information they need to truly do a decent job to help people, but certainly in my own experience, i would rather take my chances with just about any place before i put my mental health in Acadia’s hands.

        • Anonymous

          I don’t work for Acadia, so I can’t say what goes on there. We see a lot of patients that we are familiar with..we know their background, but when dealing with a new patient, we have to give them the benefit of the doubt. It is not always obvious when a patient is being manipulative. As for your son, a diagnosis is not needed for why he’s addicted to drugs…he is addicted to drugs because he experimented with them..they are ADDICTIVE drugs, hence his addiction. These are MENTAL HEALTH facilities and excuse my french but it pisses me off when drug addicts are admitted and we are expected to fix behaviors that a patient would not be displaying if they would stop abusing their drugs. In my opinion, a psychiatric unit its not the place for a drug addict…most of them are seeking admission because they’ve used their prescribed dose before they are able to refill, and an ER or their prescribing doc refuses to fill the script. I work for a voluntary unit only, so most of the patients are cooperative and want our help. As for your son snorting his medications, obviously someone has not supervised and assured that he swallowed his medication.

        • Anonymous

          “If you are not able to tell when a patient is manipulative, then arent you basically just a drug dealer?”
          No, you’re human, just like every other human.
          By the way, antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications won’t get anyone “high.”

      • jerrymyx

        In the name of God ,,,,PLEASE tell me how can a patient be responsible for their health, when their mind is sick, give me a freaken break!!! Acadia screwed up~ HE was in their in May!!!

        • Anonymous

          Just because a patient is on a psychiatric unit it does not mean they are not capable of making their own decisions, obviously you are not familiar with the wide range of mental health diagnoses. You might want to do a little research. Just because you might have a cut with sutures on your hand does not mean that you can’t use it efficiently….the same goes for the mind.

          • Anonymous

            My father told me a story several years back. I don’t remember whether he was there or whether someone told him. Regardless, a guy had a flat tire outside of either what was then BMHI or AMHI. A patient was outside on a smoke break.
            While the guy was putting the spare tire on the car, a lugnut rolled into the nearby storm drain. The guy basically muttered “Oh crap.” He didn’t know what to do because you can’t safely drive a car when a wheel doesn’t have a balance of lugnuts.
            “Just alternate the other lugnuts,” the patient told the guy.
            The guy looked at him.
            “Hey, I may be crazy, but I ain’t stupid,” the patient said.

  • Anonymous

    This is starting to unfold like an episode of CSI. Truly bizarre circumstances all around. The fact that Scott was evaluated at Acadia, released, and then committed murder and suicide does not bode well for Acadia’s reputation. I am still shocked that this all happened, as I used to work out at USA Gym with Scott, about 6-7 years ago. While I wasn’t close friends with him I spent quite a bit of time at the gym with him and hung out a handful of times at local bars and nightspots. This is shocking, to say the least. He was always such a nice, soft spoken, even keeled guy. While he looked intimidating on the outside, he was a generous and compassionate guy. He was the type of guy that would lend a hand and help you out without expecting to have the favor returned. The only explanation is that the accident he was in must have seriously altered his brain’s functioning and completely changed his personality. I feel terrible for his ex-wife and all of the families involved, this is truly a tragic situation.

    • Anonymous

      I agree, I knew Scott quite well before and after his head injury. He suffered a severe frontal head injury which is the part of the brain that affects personality. He was a completely different person after. My heart goes out to all involved.

  • Peter Hyatt

    There is so much more that can be done during the eval. It is time that new training be brought in as this sad case highlights. They must have enhanced listening skills and Analytical Interviewing as part of their protocol during these evals. Analytical Interviewing would get to the truth. It teaches intense listening, focusing heavily on pronouns, which show if a subject is giving linguistic indicators of deception. Discussion needed.

    • Anonymous

      Interesting concept…..

    • Anonymous

      Agreed. Don’t forget a Psychologist may have not done a review face to face, often an evaluator(mental health professional, but certainly not a doctor) does a face-to-face. I mean, we can sometimes not even tell when loved ones are contemplating this, and we know them better than anyone else. Sad turn of events nonetheless. Heartfelt sympathy to all families involved.

    • Anonymous

      monday morning quarterback.

    • Anonymous

      Humans make for terrible lie detectors.

  • Anonymous

    I guess Acadia really missed the mark on that one.

  • Anonymous

    Who “evaluated” him – Micky Mouse?

  • Anonymous

    Just another in a long line of Acadia success stories.

    • Anonymous

      consider this; He had a pre medicated murder plan , going to the hospital was a part of the plan ( the hospital visit and “needing ” to get his meds was the ruse to get the wife on the scene, she had fled to Portland. ) . He “faked it.”. This looks VERY well thought out , calculated and premeditated to me… right down to the detail of calling the friend to “discover” the bodies.

    • Anonymous

      How many patients have NOT killed anyone? Answer: Far, far, far more than who have.

  • Anonymous

    This is a tragic situation all the way around. Acadia (and no I am not a fan of Acadia) like any other psychiatric hospital in this state has to follow the laws when it comes to involuntary psychiatric committals of a person or what is known as ‘blue papering’ in this state.

    Short summary of ‘blue papering.’ In order to blue paper someone the individual has to be unwilling or unable to be voluntarily hospitalized (psychiatrically) and has to be deemed to be in ‘imminent risk/danger to themselves and/or others.’ They will be placed in protective custody (and kept in an ER such as EMMC) and must then be evaluated within a certain amount of time, if found to be a risk/danger and unwilling to go to a hospital for stabilization and/or treatment the blue paper process begins post evaluation. The paper is signed by a judge and only lasts 72 hours. After 72 hours one of three things have to happen at the hospital: 1. The hospital needs to admit the person voluntarily (they are willing to stay). 2. The hospital will extend the civil committal process if the person is still unwilling to stay and still overtly posing a clinical risk/danger (they are held against their will due to risk concerns) 3. If the person is no longer exhibiting any apparent risk/danger the hospital has to release them after setting up follow up appointments. If the evaluated individual is no longer indicating that they are feeling unsafe or that they do not have a plan to harm themselves/others or intent to carry out said plan and are actively indicating that they have no intention of harming themselves or anyone else….you cannot legally hold them by law or you are violating their civil rights.

    Mental health providers are not psychic and cannot read someone’s mind. They look, listen, observe and ask questions and are trained to look for inconsistencies and past history- if the history isn’t there (indicating mental illness or behavioral inconsistencies) and the person is not indicating they are a risk/danger you cannot legally hold them against their will. That’s the law.

    Look at Jovan Belcher or anyone else who seems like a ‘normal’ person and look what Mr. Belcher managed to do that was clearly not normal and all the carnage he left behind- all horrible all tragic. If the mental health professionals at Acadia had a clinical reason to hold Mr. Reed they would have done so. No one wants to have an outcome such as this- no one- including the professional’s at Acadia.

    • jerrymyx

      SO why bother to have Acadia, if it is just a revolving door for the staff to earn a salary?

      • Anonymous

        Gee Gail what would you propose ? Let me guess….. while we’re getting rid of Acadia – lets also just get rid of all the oncologists too because after all- some of their patients die and don’t forget the cardiovascular Docs who lose some of their patients or why not just get rid of ALL hospitals because people die in them every single minute of every single day and after all they must be just a revolving door for their staff to earn a salary there as well. It’s called the PRACTICE of medicine for a reason- not every patient situation is able to be successfully and medically treated or reversed – there are some things that are terminal period. That is the reality of medicine and psychiatric illness is no different than any other medical problem that is treated.

        There also comes a point where a person needs to take personal responsibility and have accountability for the choices they make in life. Smoke 50 years? Don’t be surprised when you are diagnosed with lung cancer or COPD. Obese and don’t exercise? Don’t be surprised when you are diagnosed with diabetes II or have a heart attack. Drink too much ? Don’t be surprised when you are diagnosed with cirrhosis or the liver or renal disease. People have to want to be helped- just like you cannot force someone to go on a diet who is obese- you cannot force someone to seek medical treatment if they are unwilling and pose no threat to self or others.

        Mr. Reed made a choice to unfortunately kill and commit suicide just as Jovan Belcher did- for whatever awful reasons or extenuating circumstances. No one else is responsible for Mr. Reed’s or Mr. Belcher’s choices or actions but Mr. Reed and Mr. Belcher.

        • Dixie Recked

          Terrible analogy and a awful conclusion with the given facts. If you go and have your brakes repaired and then your tire falls off when your driving down the road who do you blame?? This individual was involved in a domestic disturbance and has a psych history. He certainly should have been “Blue Papered.” This tragedy is a DIRECT result of Acadia’s INCOMPETENCE by not doing a complete and thorough assessment.

          • Anonymous

            Really car breaks ? LOL…Yeah car breaks THAT’s the same thing as a medical intervention in a hospital– speaking of terrible analogies.

            You do understand that every individual patient who receives medical treatment for a specific problem is different than every other individual patient who is treated for the exact same medical issue. What works for one patient with leukemia does not work for another with the same kind of leukemia. What works medically for someone who has had a heart attack does not work for someone else who has had a heart attack, what works for someone who has depression does not work for someone else who has depression, etc, etc, etc. Not quite the same as car breaks which all work primarily the same way. After all if it were that simplistic we would have only 1 medical procedure and 1 medication for each malady that people encounter, but we don’t, we have multiple medical procedures and multiple medications for people with a particular illness to try in order to be successful in their treatment.

            Now you don’t have to believe me….but give this a try- The next time you have pain radiating down your left arm, shortness of breath, feel nauseous and have a heavy feeling in your chest go to your local garage and see what they can do to give you a hand and see how well that works out for you… but be sure to have your next of kin contact your local funeral home…because that will be where you end up. Try again Petey.

          • Anonymous

            A person cannot be held against his will based on past behavior or past suicidal ideation. The CURRENT status of the patient is the only thing relevant.

        • jerrymyx

          The next time you reply to me, please don”t make it a LONG rant..ok In the name of God ,,,,please tell me how can a patient can be responsible for their mental health, when their MIND is sick, give me a break!!!
          Acadia staff screwed up~ and YOU know it…and that is what I think!! He was in their in May!!! Your supposed to be trained to determine when a PT is faking or not..right!! There will not be a solution to these types of problems, until the staff changes their way of thinking about responsibility and accountability!!

          • Anonymous

            It’s evident you don’t understand what mental illness is. A mental illness is not the same thing as beign ignorant. Nor is every mental illness the same as schizophrenia, in which a person is detached from reality and experiencing hallucinations and unable to understand or comprehend his surroundings.
            Several months ago, I had major surgery on my ankle. Did that mean I wasn’t capable of getting around? No. I had crutches, I used the awesome Walmart scooters. My family drove me to appointments and to stores.
            Just because a person is thinking of killing himself doesn’t mean he can’t learn about taking a medication that will help stabilize his brain chemistry, or participate in counseling to discuss why he feels the way he does.

          • Anonymous

            You clearly have no idea of what you are speaking about Gail. An adult patient (unless under medical guardianship) always has the right to NOT accept medical treatment. Gone are the days-thankfully- when you could medicate a patient against their will, or when you could make a patient stay in a hospital against their will (without being court mandated), or when you could sterilize patients without their consent or lobotomize them, etc., etc., etc,. A medical provider can not legally MAKE a patient do anything that the patient does not want to do that’s THE LAW. You can believe that or not- it really doesn’t matter- as your lack of understanding or knowledge or disagreement does not make the law any less true or factual. Some people believe in unicorns…..doesn’t make them real.

          • jerrymyx

            IF for one second, you believe staff in the hospital cannot hold a PT, in the hospital, without a court order, or medical guardianship in place,… you are sadly misinformed. I personally KNOW to the contrary!!! You are in the dark or in your opinion to what the hospital can or cannot do. ! I would rather err in my assessment of a PT”s rights, than risk losing their life or the life of someone else, as what happened in the case we are debating! Then again you have to be able to think outside the box, unfortunately, trained puppets cannot achieve that task!

          • Anonymous

            Sigh…….Gail an individual may be placed in ‘protective custody’ while waiting to be mentally assessed and therefore can not leave until the clinical assessment has been completed by a licensed clinician or a physician and a clinical disposition is derived. These are usually completed at a hospital ED due to the need to have medical clearance for the client. Then 1 of 3 things can happen: 1.the patient is deemed safe and released 2. a voluntary hospital bed or crisis bed is located for them or 3. they are blue papered. You have to find the least restrictive appropriate setting to meet the client’s clinical needs and safety needs. That’s the reality Gail that’s the process. Try again.

            I’m sure we all would love to hear about your personal ‘contrary knowledge’ so by all means feel free to share- what hospital are you talking about? What was the particular situation? How long was someone ‘held’ against their will…..but you won’t Gail…because yet again you don’t have any idea as to what you are talking about. Speaking of being not up to speed. LOL.

        • jerrymyx

          you need to learn the concept of staying on topic!!

    • Anonymous

      Awesome explanation….well said!

  • Anonymous

    Don’t blame Acadia for someones insanity.. They can’t hold him and I’m glad they can’t.. Imagine grabing people up off the street keeping them in Acadia indefinetly without their consent. Grow up! Grow a pair!! You can’t stop people from living and dying.. You people who are blaming others need help

  • Anonymous

    Nine of the 13 exhibited suicidal behavior before committing the crimes. Peee pour job….

    • Anonymous

      And you were there for the evaluation, of course…

  • Anonymous

    How can a mental hospital NOT keep a person for a few days or so if they are suicidal and tell someone? People in fear of another person need to rely on others to help them and have a police officer take the guy his meds, not meet them alone.

  • Anonymous

    In just a few hours, I will be in Hermon attending a Memorial Service to honor the life of Danielle Reed. Two weeks ago today, Dani’s life was cut short in an act almost too horrible to comprehend. As the facts of the case have been made
    public in the media, we have learned more details about the timing, forensics,
    etc. that are more disturbing than the last.
    What has become crystal clear, though, is that the outcome was
    predictable. Not predictable by Dani, and not by her friends or family, although many are currently assuming guilt for not preventing this. But it certainly
    was predictable, in fact probable, based on the statistics available regarding
    situations like this. Mental health workers, law enforcement, and various agencies created specifically to deal with these scenarios are more familiar with the key indicators that should have been RED FLAGS, yet evidently were all ignored.

    Some readers will blame Danielle for not filing charges, but
    those of you more familiar with the system know that to do so in many cases is
    like waving the red flag in front of the bull, then opening the gate to let him
    out. Until such time as our laws -when violated -have actual teeth and appropriate levels of punishment, many victims of domestic violence are more afraid of the fallout of “filing charges” or obtaining a Protection Order. Our laws
    need to be such that the responsibility, or onus, of filing the charges is
    removed from the victim.

    Some of you may blame Dani for going to her house alone, against the advice of her family, to help him get his medications. It doesn’t surprise me to learn that
    Danielle, known for her compassion toward others, was lured to that house using
    her sense of kindness against her. A law enforcement friend has told me that it takes a “special kind of mind” to brutally murder a spouse or partner whom they once loved. Most of us could never comprehend this thought process, even though we may have arguments that become heated on occasion. I’m sure that Dani never truly believed that she was in mortal danger, or she wouldn’t have agreed to meet
    him. Please be very careful not to blame Danielle for her own horrific murder.
    She was not trained to recognize the danger she was in, any more than
    you friends and family who are now blaming yourselves for not doing more.

    Our system failed Dani, and it is that system where we must focus our attention and make changes to try to prevent this from happening to more victims. I believe the families of the offenders need to speak out, also.
    Please send a message to any potential perpetrators of this act what
    this has done to you. You are also a victim, as you will have to live with this
    for the rest of your lives. If one considers the consequences to mothers and
    fathers and aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc., perhaps it may stop them from
    pulling that trigger.

    Rest in peace, Dani. You will surely be missed by many.

    • Anonymous

      So sorry for your loss! It has become all too common. When I heard the husband was at Acadia a day or two before I (sadly) chuckled because I’ve seen it over and over. The spouse goes in for an evaluation (manditory or voluntary), is prescribed meds and is released. There is typically no ongoing therapy or counseling. Please say a extra prayer for Dani for me. Take care!

    • Anonymous

      Well said.

  • Anonymous

    they release people go all the time at Acadia that really need to be in the hospital. its sad. this woman could be alive today possibly if they would have kept him there

    • Anonymous

      I wonder why people are allowed to talk themselves out the door when they’ve been brought in because they’re dangerous to self or others. Wasn’t it a few years ago they released a guy who went home and murdered his father and would’ve killed his mom if she didn’t flee?

  • Anonymous

    Reed was nuts long before he married Dani..I know a girl he dated and he put her through hell and she had to move out of state…Don’t blame his actions on a head injury..He Had Mental problems long before that

  • Anonymous

    Does Anyone else find it weird that there have been no photos published of the people involved in this sad story?

  • Anonymous

    They probably gave him drugs at the hospital, or knew his medications and sent him on his way, as to them and law he is fine and dandy. All they do is believe the medications are ok, even though they are not or have no effect, but at least they can say they did something before releasing someone and performing such acts like this. Whereas, if someone doesn’t take medications they will argue that they need to do something to be able to prove the person is safe, and keep someone longer, or recommend a longer stay, but cannot force someone to stay if they are not harmful to themselves or others.

    All the more reason I do not think that blue papers should be the end all be all, and take people’s rights away. We should hold out for white papers for those unmedicated, and maybe hold patients without prescribing medication for a few days to better access the situation.

    How do we know someone is not being vindictive and help commit someone and is the one who lost touch with reality rather than the one being committed by the estranged relative and two strangers?

    Mental hospitals were used to get rid of spouses. Has it gotten any better?

    However, those who have proven they need mediation to stay stable, should be barred from things like accessing deadly weapons, whether they are voluntarily committed or not, to prevent such actions. Going off any medication there will be a period of withdrawal and we do not know all people’s reactions.

  • Borrington

    This is a horrible tragedy and I’m very saddened by every aspect of it. As I read through the comments about how awful the mental health system is in Maine, many things come to mind, but what stands out the most to me is Dan Young asking me when we were kids if I knew why Maine was so heavily populated with mental illness. “Because everyone puts their crazy friends and family on the train and says ‘take em to the end of the line'”. Thank you for that insightful quote, Dan. Even now, through all this sorrow, you have the ability to make me smile. My sincere condolences to the families and everyone whose lives have been impacted by this awful event.

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