December 16, 2017
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Comments for: Grass for biofuel could be the next cash crop in Aroostook County

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  • Anonymous

    I want to grow grass

  • Anonymous

    The U of M has no shame, accepting a $62,334 dollar grant to study “prairie coal”, good grief UMFK, they burned hay twist in their dugouts on the prairie, but it was never any serious fuel, this is really a funny one, LOL, I think they need a grant to study Moose droppings too, as a bio-fuel, LOL.

    • Anonymous

      yes science is of the devil

      • Anonymous

        LOL??

        • Anonymous

          Indeed.

    • Anonymous

      Fuel from grass?
      Great concept.
      Fallow farm fields may be utilized for energy production.

      Now , if only the experts can figure out a way to turn
      all the extra trees into fuel they might be onto something.
      I look forward to new research in that regard.

      • Anonymous

        They’re working on it.

  • Anonymous

    When you see “grant” you know it’s not “sustainable.”

    • Anonymous

      That makes no difference to the libs.

    • Anonymous

      First thing I thought of when I first read this article. What I want to know is, is how much energy does this stuff make vs. how much does it take to produce?

      • Anonymous

        Good question, but I’ll bet the energy balance is favorable.

        • Anonymous

          I will wager it is not.

          • Anonymous

            The data will tell. We need the analysis.

  • Anonymous

    Its already being done in NY.
    http://www.enviroenergyny.com/
    I visited him last year for a tour of his facility, and brought a ton of grass pellets home to burn in my furnace. Worked fine, quite a bit more ash.
    He has a deal to harvest the median strips on the NY interstates, pellet the hay, and sell it back to the DOT to heat their garages. A smart man.

    • Anonymous

      What brand of furnace you got, teat?

  • Anonymous

    The use of switchgrass as a biofuel is many times more efficient than corn.

    It is 94% less poluting than gasoline. Very exciting for Aroostook farmers and the nation.

    Check out this article: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/science/jan-june08/switchgrass_01-11.html

    • Anonymous

      It is twitch grass

    • Anonymous

      its crapola…..

    • Anonymous

      Unless it’s converted to motor fuel, that’s not the concept here. It will burn dirtier (smoke and ash), with less heating energy than petroleum fuels, and will still emit CO2 (which admitedly would eventually be emitted by decomposition).

      • Anonymous

        It’s just another possible addition to our future energy needs. Shouldn’t neglect the future because of past thinking.

  • Anonymous

    John Martin? Nuff said!

  • Anonymous

    Oh, Yeah, I can see a lot coming out of this, LOL, it could never be cost effective, good Gawd, how gullible can people be.

    • Anonymous

      Why could it not be cost effective? Fuel oil is almost 4 bucks a gallon. Grass grows real cheap and if it is not for feed then it is even easier to grow. Google grass/straw boilers and there are already plenty of solutions.

      • Anonymous

        Okay, think about it for a minute, I have filled many a barn full of hay, now, at $4.00 a bale, howmany would it take to keep a house warm for 24 hours? You have to plow, till, fertilize, cut, bale haul, store, this grass, and then, if it is processed, that is more money, now really, think about it.

        • northernmaine

          Like other biomass fuels I believe the switchgrass would be made into pellets, and handled, stored and burned much like wood pellets.
          I doubt we need a taxpayer funded study, that switchgrass used to grow quite easily as I recall from my potato picking days, the farmers spent a lot of money trying to get rid of it.

  • Anonymous

    More taxpayer money wasted

  • Hahahaha hahahaha……what a bunch of moonbats! Grass for fuel when we have a huge supply of oil!….you loons will never cease to amaze! This is just a deception so the college leech professors can squeeze more money from you! Wake up!

    • Anonymous

      You are probably right but…heating oil right now is almost $4.00 a gallon, or about $400.00 per 100 gallons. Wood pellets on the other hand are running about $200.00 per ton. I was told that a ton of pellets yields btu’s equal to roughly 150 gallons of oil. If true, then pellets are real bargain, costing about half of the price of oil but yeilding more heat over time. If grass pellets can do the same thing, then these pellets would be an even better value on the economy and environment. Grass crops could be grown every year on the same peice of land, while it takes years for trees to grow. And turning the grass over after cutting would help fertilize the ground. Making the fields more fertile for other types of crop production.

  • Anonymous

    It is good, we get a comic relief article once in a while, we do get too serious, but, it is good to test your inner self, our ability to quickly sort out b—s–t, and keep our resistance to all the stupidity that gets written up, as something actually intelligent, I feel I passed this one, I must be, I am still laughing.

  • Anonymous

    Can you imagine if it was pot, burn that in your furnace….

    • Anonymous

      I can see it now ! The chimney sweeps advertising, ” We will clean your chimney even while you burn “. LOL

      • Anonymous

        HIillarious…

  • Anonymous

    John and a $62,334.00 grant. Let me explain how this will work to the people from Northern Maine that can’t figure well. First we will need to prepare the field,$22,334.00 to Johns partner for equipment rental. Second $20,000.00 for supplies from Johns store (yes that store). And last $20,000.00 lease for Johns land. If he plays his cards right he maybe able to get a grant from Soil Conservation for the bridge they will need to put in and the cabin they will need for shelter while working in the field. There is life after public service, good for you.

  • Guest

    It’s not much different than wood pellets being burned in a stove and a very quick fuel to ‘grow’.

  • County Escapee

    We used to feed it to cows, but didn’t collect the dried pasture pies (chips) like the Western settlers did for their fuel.

  • Anonymous

    Maine Technology Asset Fund Awards $1.65 million to UMaine to Develop Grass Pellet Technology

    October 21st, 2010

    http://umaine.edu/ext-energy/blog/2010/10/21/grass-pellet-technology/
    notice the dateJust a drop in the bucket to whats already been spent.

  • Anonymous

    If Mr. Martin is involved I think I would pass. He has to clean up his act a little to be a reputable business man in my opinion. We have a enough bio stuff going on around here and don’t need any more. And if there was a market for this why aren’t we seeing it in the stores.

  • Anonymous

    Sounds like it could be cost effective but they should show the figures. Switch grass and other grasses have been proposed for fast growing sources of ethanol and other fuels. However, I don’t think much of ethanol as a gasoline additive, however.

  • Anonymous

    Industrial Hemp would be a good alternative biomass crop for a project like this, I bet it would produce higher yeilds, and would be a more valuable, versatile crop.

    • Anonymous

      Industrial Hemp is the only answer to save the County, but just try and get the politicians to listen to a really good idea, you will not see a Grant for that study.

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