Comments for: Last defendant graduates from defunct Bangor drug court

Posted Nov. 24, 2012, at 5:44 p.m.

BANGOR | Todd Robertson is the last of his kind. The 30-year-old restaurant worker is not the last person to be charged with drug trafficking in Penobscot County but he is the final defendant to graduate from its drug court. The Penobscot County Drug Court was shuttered by the …

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  • Anonymous

    Congratulations Todd Robertson. You now have your rights back and your responsibilities back. Cherish and respect them and those of all others.

  • Anonymous

    Congratulations. Don’t take your second chance lightly, make your parents proud.

  • Anonymous

    i too completed the program and i can say it was easy to do good and stay clean in the program because you have a so called “safety net”…the real test is when you are out on your own.

    • Anonymous

      So true. I have had a grandson go through the program, so far so good. I have known quite a few that have gone through only to fail by returning to their old friends and ways.
      Drug court works. It works in that it gives people the tools they need to help them beat their addictions. They themselves have to supply the most important ingredient. They have to learn to love themselves enought to beat back the chemical addictions in their brain. Many have been addicted for so long and from such an early age that they have no idea what normal feels like. Consequently they often don’t recognize it when they reach it.
      There is no guarentees in ‘Drug Court’. It is a tool that can be used or misued.

    • Bill Cat

      Agreed, going through treatment is the easy part — the ready-made safety net and pretty much drug free surroundings. The safety net is out here too, but it takes action to get into it. Meeting makers make it, partner.

      • Anonymous

        You got that right!

  • Anonymous

    It is a terrible shame that the drug court got shut down, and for financial reasons, too. Money spent in substance abuse treatment and rehab has a massive return on investment and the folks at Wellspring do truly amazing work. Hopefully that gap can get filled somehow so that others in the Bangor area will be able to get the treatment that they need.

  • Bill Cat

    ” Co-occurring Disorders Court” How does a judge even order that with a straight face? Sounds like the last time I went to Wendys, got the wrong food and the manager nearly had a breakdown over it. AAARRRGGGHHH!!!

    Great to hear that Todd got the idea, though. He seems to be talking the right talk and serious about his recovery. It works if ya work it.

  • Anonymous

    I wish all who have been affected by addiction success and hope this program returns.One of my good friends in school died from bad choices and left behind a two year old as well as many people who loved him..How that can happen,I just don’t know,but life is not even.

  • Conley Raye

    Maybe some past grads can step up an help these offenders outside of the formal court proceedings. People helping people,

  • Anonymous

    “Graduates”. As if being sober is an achievement that requires scholarly effort.

    • Bill Cat

      Takes more effort than you’ll ever understand, apparently, regardless of the title.

    • Anonymous

      It takes great effort. Maybe you have to live it to truly understand. Getting clean and sober takes a huge amount of work few “earth people” know about.

  • Anonymous

    It is unconscionable that this program has been eliminated from budgeting. Do those responsible for funding think that we have less of a drug problem now as compared to a few years ago? Look at any of the court reports and you will see that generally speaking, over 50% of those charged are facing some type of drug related offenses. We need more preventative measures and more programs to help those who are already addicted.

    When will people wake up and realize that addiction to opiates is a disease. I say this because one person could take opiates for a month and not have any withdrawal while another person could take opiates for three days and have terrible withdrawal. It’s the withdrawal that causes the problem. Because it is such an awful experience people do not want to go through it and they will do anything to avoid it, such as stealing, robbing pharmacies, etc.

    You may be susceptible to addiction and not even know it. If you are ever prescribed opiates, you will find out real quick when your prescription runs out. I wouldn’t wish it upon anybody, having gone through it myself but if more people understood the hell that addicts go through during withdrawal we would see a lot more compassion from the public.

  • Addiction is not a disease. Anyone who suggests otherwise is an enabler.

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