Comments for: What’s next for the Maine Republican Party?

Posted Nov. 16, 2012, at 4:47 p.m.
Last modified Nov. 18, 2012, at 11:54 a.m.

AUGUSTA | For Maine Republicans, the crash this year came as hard and swiftly as the surge of 2010. Two years ago, Maine voters elected Paul LePage to serve as the state’s first Republican governor in 16 years and swept GOP lawmakers into majorities in both chambers of the …

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  • Jake_OO7

    Let’s see, first they will claim that a non-white person voted in Maine, then they will not lift a finger to help Mainers with their health care. After that they will get the boot out the door. :}

    • Anonymous

      Charlie Webster’s comment should not be perceived as the opinions of the entire party. The comment was as lame as the person who made it. As far as the State of Maine setting up the exchange that the Federal Government is mandating, their plan, let them set it up.

      • StillRelaxin

        I’ll be willing to extend more acceptance of your comment here and hope to your party when you also begin to speak out against the absurdity of MANY of the things that come out of the mouth of your party’s true leader in our State, Mr. LePage.

        • Anonymous

          I do not agree with how Gov. LePage communicates as a whole, his delivery of his opinions and views needs work to say the least. I will agree with the content of his overall message in getting our fiscal house in order and some of the methods that it will take to do so. The Republican Party here in Maine and across the nation does need to step back and examine their overall agenda and how that agenda is communicated to the electorate. The demographics of this country have changed, as well as the needs of the population as a whole. I do agree that the need for fiscal conservatism is stronger now than ever and the message just is not getting through to the majority of our population. We can’t continue to borrow, tax and spend and think that everything will be ok. We can’t count on the Democrats to embrace that fact, so as Republicans the message needs to be softened to be more palatable to the majority.

          • StillRelaxin

            I am in agreement with every word you just said. Unlike many on the right, as a rational human being I don’t for a second believe the campaign rhetoric that Democratic leadership is all about or about to, borrow, tax and spend this country into oblivion. That would be illogical since we all know that the best economist on the planet (regardless of their politics) are working on finding the safest and most intelligent long term solution out of the Great Recession of 2008. Some folks who have done extremely well since 2001 as well as though the depths of this recession while the country as a whole has floundered are going to pay the old rates (prior to the Bush Tax Cuts). They’ll get over it and survive just like the rest of us have since 2001 when the poop began hitting the fan and we all began paying extra to make those taxes cuts sustainable, well at least until the bottom fell out of everything that held cash.

      • Anonymous

        “Charlie Webster’s comment should not be perceived as the opinions of the entire party”. HE IS the R party leader . He was elected to the position By R’s .No one (R) has tried to stop him . Not only has NO ONE tried to stop him , people, like SUMMERS , gave his views wings by buying into and giviing credibility to his claims of voter fraud. SO what ARE people supposed to conclude?? I’m listening . I’;m concluding they shoukd be allowed anywhere NEAR “leadership” . Apparently ,I am not alone

        • Anonymous

          Because he is the party “leader” does not indicate that his opinions are that of the rank and file members of the Republican Party. I do think that there was widespread voter fraud throughout the country in this election cycle. As far as here in Maine, I do not know, but I am sure that there was to a certain degree. This to me is all the more reason for a mandatory method of voter identification nationally, as well as not allowing voter registration on the day of an election.

      • Anonymous

        “Their plan, let them set it up” — so that’s kind of like, take responsibility for your doings? So, how about Webster and his party take responsibility for their doings? Houding and demonizing voters for example. But no, you seem comfortable just brushing it off as a lame remark.

        • Anonymous

          I am not simply brushing his remark off as lame, I am not putting anymore stock in his comment than is deserved, considering where it came from. As far as the Federal Government making this mandate to the states to set up exchanges, I stand by my opinion, they mandated it, let them set up the exchange.

      • Anonymous

        I should hope that CW does not reflect the opinions of the majority of Rs but sometimes I wonder …

      • Anonymous

        The problem has been that so many republican party members here and in other states make dumb, racist, ignorant statements that it is difficult to see the party as anything else.

        • Anonymous

          So, no Democrat has made a dumb, racist or ignorant comment? I beg to differ.

          • Anonymous

            First give me an example where a democrat made a dumb, ignorant, or racist statement where other democrats did not express their disdain. The problem I am pointing out is that in the last couple of years so many republicans have made irrational statements and so often none of the leadership or average people have pointed it out. This leaves the average voter with the impression that the republican party supports these comments.
            An exception is the recent comment by Rmoney that Obama won the elections because he gave “gifts” to the blacks and hispanics, and young voters. In this case several republican governors have ridiculed it. That should occur much more often as the reactionaries attempt to control the republican party.

          • Anonymous

            Joe Biden speaking to a group at a campaign rally in Danville, Virginia with a majority in attendance being black stated ” He is going to put ya’ll back in chains”

            Anytime Nancy Pelosi opens her mouth something dumb or ignorant sneaks out.

            “Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid throwing bows at President Obama back in 2008, saying that he had “no Negro dialect” unless he chose to use one.”

            Geraldine Ferraro
            “If Obama was a white man, he would not be in this position. And if he was a woman of any color, he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is. And the country is caught up in the concept.” [To the Torrance Daily Breeze in March 2008]

            Lyndon Johnson
            “I’ll have those ni**ers voting Democratic for the next 200 years”

          • Anonymous

            Joe Biden was speaking about Rmoney’s economic and tax policies, and meant economic chains. At any rate, I agree with that particular comment as that would happen under Rmoney.

            Nancy Pelosi is just used as a talking point for the right wing nuts and I dismiss almost all characterization of her by the right wing.
            It does not matter what she says, the right wing nuts will try to twist it.

            There is no excuse for Reid’s comment . It was just plain dumb.

            Geraldine Ferraro is irrelevant.
            LBJ was using language which was common at the time through out the country and before political correctness (cultural sensitivity) came in vogue. That would be strongly condemned today, but you are grasping at straws to go that far back.
            The examples you provide, except for Reed’s, do not compare to the frequency and widespread occurrence of those by the various state and federal republican candidates this year alone.
            Again, it leaves the impression the republican party is made up of a bunch of ignorant (lacking knowledge) people not aware of which century they live in.

          • Anonymous

            You can try to explain the quotes I provided any way you would like, at least I provided quotes versus your in general statement backed with no verifiable evidence or quotes.
            Joe Biden was playing a race card to a black audience.
            Nancy Pelosi is not a talking point, she is the leader of the Democrats in the House.
            Geraldine Ferraro being irrelevent in your eyes, none the less, she is a Democrat that made a racist comment.
            LBJ’s comment, beliefs and ideas are part of what the Democrat Party is today.

          • Anonymous

            Joe Biden’s comments were a legitimate criticism of Rmoney’s policies, no matter how you want to interpret it.
            Any thing Pelosi says is twisted by the right.
            Most people today do not even know who Geraldine Ferraro is, and she is not a prominent participant in the democratic party today.
            Any one can go back into US history and find offensive comments by any prominent politician. Perhaps you are too young to remember that the n word was in common use until the late 1960s. LBJ was a Texas politician who privately did a great deal for minorities. He was the hidden driving force behind the 1964 civil rights amendment. He would be strongly denounced today for such speech, and is mainly remembered today for his “war on poverty”, which brought attention to the plight of Americans across the country. That is his legacy, not his southern attitude. PBS shows a series on the US Presidents from time to time. You might find his story surprising. At any rate, going back 40+ years is not relevant to today’s republican party in this case. Most people will be more influenced by comments made in the last couple of years. The real issue here is that the republican party has left the public with the impression that they have a bunch of idiots as leaders.

          • Anonymous

            Still waiting for the quotes of the Republicans that you accuse of being racist.

          • Anonymous

            Sarah Palin’s “shuck and jive” comment is just one. Rather than try to sort out racist comments from the rest of the republican lies over the last 4 years, I suggest you just google “republican racism”.

          • Anonymous

            Sarah Palin is as irrelevent as you claim Geraldine Ferraro is. Why don’t you google Democratic racism and see what you find there. The Democrats are happy to make those that are less fortunate more and more dependant upon the government for support and in this they secure their votes, remember the quote I gave from LBJ.

          • Anonymous

            Sarah Palin was the republican VP candidate during Obama’s first run for President. She is currently, or until recently, a commentator on the Fox network, and republicans still pay attention to her statements.

            The statement that democrats want to make the less fortunate more dependent on government is straight from Rush Limbaugh, Breitbart, Glenn Beck, or one of their cronies, and Fox news. It is more likely that the republican corporate toadies want people poor so they will fight to get jobs. That way the corporate multimillionaires can offer to pay low wages. In fact, republicans and their masters are constantly attempting to do away with the minimum wage and hire kids so they can pocket even more money.

          • Anonymous

            The comment about the Democrats wanting the less fortunate to depend upon the government did not come from Rush or Beck as I do not listen to either, it came from me. Remember my quote from LBJ. That is the basis of the true liberal agenda.
            What do you mean by “republicans and their masters” ?

          • Anonymous

            The comment is almost word for word what Rush Limbaugh and others have said.
            For republican masters, look at ALEC’s programs, and then look at the many states where their plans were introduced as bills by republican lawmakers. The most prominent one is the voter id laws. Others along the same line are eliminating same day registration, cutting voting hours and the number of polling stations, cutting back on the number of days available for early voting. Other ALEC policies involve eliminating the minimum wage, hiring kids as janitors at their schools to eliminate the usually unionized workers
            Alec is just one republican master. There is also Grover Norquist. Most of the Congressional republicans have signed a pledge to him which they interpret allows them to supersede their oath to uphold the Constitution.
            There are several others but detailing them would make this much too long.
            I do not believe you know anything about LBJ, judging by your basing your opinion on one comment from 40+ yrs ago.

          • Anonymous

            Maybe there is something to the comment about the less fortunate beig kept dependant on the government.
            As far as ALEC, what is wrong with a government that plays a smaller roll in our lives, operates within it’s means and eliminates waste, wow what a novel concept.
            LBJ proposed and passed legislation that was important and needed, and by doing so cemented the support of those that the legislation benefited from that day forward.

            As far as voter registration, Every voter should show an ID, such as a voter registration card bearing their photo, no registering on election day and voting should not be confined to one day. It should take place over the matter of two to three days so that everyone that is eligable and wants to vote has the opportunity.

          • Anonymous

            ALEC is an organization that was originally intended to promote business interests. Instead, it has been prominent in creating legislation that restricts the rights of others. When it was revealed what they were actually doing a large number of major corporations withdrew their support.
            There is no reason to require voters to show id. The claim by republicans, such as Charlie Webster, were proven false. Voting is a fundamental part of our political system. It should be made available and as easy as possible to the greatest number of people. There are already laws with penalties for fraudulent voting, and most of the errors occurring at the polling station are clerical or administrative. Voter id will not solve those. The evidence was put forth before the last election that the voter id laws would most likely effect those with limited means of getting an id. That included the poor without transportation, the elderly (even many veterans) or those living in rural areas where the town office was only open a few days each week. In many cases the hours of operation was restricted to the normal working days, which meant someone had to give up part of a day’s pay in order to register. In some states registration facilities were limited in their hours of operation in poor areas, while those in affluent areas were given more hours. Oddly enough the state official in charge of setting hours was a republican.
            The best solution would be to move election day to Saturday. The choice of Tuesday is a 160+ year old one based on the ability of farmers to get to the polling place without missing church on Sunday or market day on Wednesday. It is time for a change to the 21st century.

          • Anonymous

            I stand by my opinion in regards to voter registration and photo ID. You and many on the left claim that the process would make it difficult for the poor, the elderly and so on to get somewhere to obtain an ID for voting, that is a large load of bull. They seem to be able to get anywhere else they want or need to. There is a whole year between elections to obtain a ID.

            Your following statement is so typical of the left.

            “In some states registration facilities were limited in their hours of operation in poor areas, while those in affluent areas were given more hours. Oddly enough the state official in charge of setting hours was a republican.” Which state, which official what an in general, off the wall statement.
            The only reason the left does not want the requirement for a photo ID to vote is very obvious, it will cost them votes.
            The old phrase attributed to the left…Vote early and vote often.

          • Anonymous

            The only reason the right wants to restrict voting is that the more people who vote, the less chance the right has of pushing their agenda.
            “I don’t want everybody to vote…As a matter of fact, our leverage in the elections quite candidly goes up as the voting population goes down.” Paul Weyrich, founder of ALEC, cofounder of the Heritage Foundation and the Moral Majority. That says it all and no attempt by right wing nuts to claim voter fraud or other motives of the democrats will bury that statement.

          • Anonymous

            Ohio restricted registration in counties leaning democratic to the hours between 8 am and 5 pm, while expanding those in republican leaning counties to nights and weekends. The republican Secretary of State, Jon Husted, blocked efforts to expand the time period for the democratic leaning counties. Now, you may think I am bsing, but I do my research, and as I said, your posts sound like they come straight from the mouth of Beck, et al.
            Rather than me going through the voter suppression efforts state by state, use your computer and do the following;
            1) google “restrict access to voter registration” and

            2) skip down to the pdf entitled “Defending Democracy”. It is a pdf download consisting of 72 pages so it would take you awhile to read it all, but of course you can skim through it to find sections of interest.

          • Anonymous

            Try this link, apparently not all minorities buy into the voter suppression claims from the left. Demetrius Minor seems to have it figured out fairly well.

            http://www.nationalcenter.org/P21NVMinorVoterID90712.html

          • Anonymous

            Geraldine Ferraro has been DEAD for almost 2 years!

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geraldine_Ferraro

          • Anonymous

            And after Biden and Pelosi, you had to go back many years to find offensive comments. One gets on a tea party blog, or argues with Tea Partiers to this very minute, and their comments burn the hair off of anyone who thinks, or opposes them. Not saying the progressive liberals don’t lower themselves as well. But for sheer volume of hate and ugliness, 24/7? Tea Party Republicans.

          • Anonymous

            Here’s a couple. It was Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Democrat, who founded the Ku Klux Klan.

            Woodrow Wilson segregated Federal Buildings and jobs after 50 years of integration under largely Republican administrations.

            It was the Democrat Party in the South that instituted Jim Crow Laws.

            It was the Democrat Party in the South that instituted “separate but equal”.

            It was the Democrat Party in the South that supported the Ku Klux Klan.

            It was George Wallace and the Democrat Party in the South that said “Segregation Forever”.

            It
            was Orval Faubus and the Democrat Party that wanted the Arkansas
            National Guard to enforce segregation, and Dwight Eisenhower, a
            Republican President, that sent the 101st Airborne to integrate the
            schools.

            It
            was Bull Connor, a member of the Democrat National Committee, who
            turned the hoses on the marchers in Birmingham, and it was the
            Republicans who made up the majority that passed the 1964 Civil Rights
            Act, over the filibuster of such Democrat paragons as William Fulbright
            and Al Gore Sr. – and Grand Kleagle Byrd.

            (And no, the Dixiecrats didn’t join the Republican Party – most of them remained Democrats.)

            It was the Democrats who kept Grand Kleagle Byrd in the party.

            It was Democrats who called General Colin Powell a “house nigger”.

            It
            was Democrats who called Condi Rice – who grew up with and knew the
            little girls in Birmingham who were blown up, by Democrats – an “Aunt
            Jemima” and ran cartoons of her with fat lips doing Hattie McDaniel
            riffs.

            It
            was Democrats, or at least Obama supporters, who called Stacy Dash a
            hundred different racist names for daring to leave the Democrat
            plantaion. (sic) It’s the Democrats who hold annual dinners
            honoring Andrew Jackson, who owned slaves and who orchestrated the
            Removal, the Trail of Tears, the near genocide of several of the Indian
            Nations.

      • Anonymous

        Well that’s stupid. If there is an opportunity to tailor Affordable Healthcare for the state of Maine WHY WOULDN’T one take advantage of that opportunity? The most obvious example cited a lot is that the Feds want much of the choices and ‘paperwork’ done online. Well quitre a few in Maine don’t have easy access to reliable internet. How best could that be addressed? Clearly semloh, your statement is so freaking lame and petulant, that you are the problem not part of the solution.

  • Anonymous

    They reap what they sow.

  • StillRelaxin

    As a liberal I don’t care about the Republican party at all but I have to say that this Rep. Ken Fredette, R-Newport is giving me concern. Just when I thought there were no normal thinking Republicans left to be found, SHAZAMM! He pops up and starts talking more sense than I’ve heard out of a Republican in 20 years. Maybe they aren’t dead yet? We’ll see how much life his party will have based upon how well and how soon they warm up to the type of mainstream logic he’s now selling.

  • Anonymous

    Accepting reality would be a nice start….Science, math…things like that. If they think its just tactical changes they need to make, then they should get ready to enjoy the political wilderness for years to come.

    • Anonymous

      It’s good to know that the new Republican leader plans to be “embracing” lots of women over the next two years. Sounds like a real plan for success.

      But how does his wife feel about it?

      • Anonymous

        maybe murdering more children? Oh that is right Democrats call them fetusus

        • Anonymous

          A pro-life/anti-abortion stance is one thing. The GOP advocated against contraception earlier this year, under a flimsy free speech guise. It’s that kind of stance that will really bring in less women to vote for Republicans. Their policies effecting hispanics, the poor, elderly, gays, blacks and most other minority groups have also been unintentionally designed to get these people not to vote Republican. If you add all the minorities excluded by policy from the Republican platform, it’s most of America.

          • Anonymous

            You mean opening the borders,letting illegal immigrants in. My grandparents had to get here legally.

        • Grateful Head

          You need a dictionary. Child and foetus are not synonyms.

          • Anonymous

            death is death

  • Anonymous

    I disagree with Mr. Gagnon’s assertion that it isn’t a matter of conservatism or moderation, mainly because, to me, the direction of today’s GOP isn’t conservative: it is reactionary, and there is a clear difference between the two. The day their primary voters select more moderate, experienced and truly thoughtful candidates for statewide and legislative offices will be the day things will look brighter. Continuing to line up behind of reactionary ideologues seeking some sort of return to a perceived golden age might satisfy the purists who would rather lose than adapt to change, but it won’t do much for the party’s long term health. It’s up to them.

    • Anonymous

      Mr Gagnon’s assessments seem wrong very often.

    • StillRelaxin

      I work with and meet a lot of ignorant or dumb (it’s hard to tell sometimes) people everyday, you madam/sir are not one of them. Thanks for showing up here.

      • Anonymous

        hpmcg is right and YOU are the problem

        • StillRelaxin

          Since I am 100% in agreement with hpmcg it would appear that you are agreeing with us both, yet illogically shouting that I’m the problem with what all three of us agree on. Honestly I can’t make any sense of your opposing positions here.

    • Anonymous

      I’m waiting for an explanation from some Republican about how the Republican Party Chairman, speaking for the party, fabricating dozens of law-breaking black people roaming rural Maine isn’t racist.

      How do you get more racist than that? I’d like to know.

      Really. I would.

      What sports caster, what news anchor, what…. anything but Maine Republican Chairman would continue five minutes longer in thier job if they said such a thing?

      • Anonymous

        PS Maine’s Republican Party Chairman Charlie – the blacks are out to get us – Webster rated a mention in Gail Collins’ regular column in today’s New York Times.
        Yet another worldwide embarassment of Maine thanks to Republican leaders.

    • Anonymous

      Problem with moderation it has gone to far, the Demacrats bow to every Liberal idea. Republicans have stayed their ground while Democrats have obviously moved to a far more liberal agenda.

      • StillRelaxin

        Have you not considered the possibility that the reason the Democrats have moved toward moderation might be because they are simply a reflection of the public/citizenry/voters who elect them? Whereas the GOP/Tea Party seems to be fixated on some “perceived golden age” (Credit hpmcg above for that one) that most Americans have been evolving away from for the past 150 years. Clearly it’s time for the GOP/Tea Party to modify their thinking on a few issues, yes?

        • Anonymous

          possibly, not so far the other way you can’t look back.

      • Anonymous

        “Republicans have stayed their ground…” Tea party republicans like our governor, Sen. Doug Thomas, Charlie Webster et. al are way out of touch: that’s what the issue is. It has not one thing to do with democrats. Shut off Rush and get in tune with the real world, that might help. The tea party is the mouth piece of obese white men who think they are superior to the poor, gays, women and anyone else who holds an opinion that threatens their power. They want control, not justice.

        • Anonymous

          I do not listen to Rush nor any of the others. I do not listen to the propaganda on the other liberal stations that speak for the Democrats.Justice, yea right, let all the illegal aliens in

          • Anonymous

            You are obviously prejudiced. You have no idea at all what ‘democrats’ stand for, as if they are one cohesive whole like tea party know nothings.

            Illegal aliens and justice? What would you do to protect a 3,000 mile border? Station a soldier every 5 feet and kill anything that moves? Then complain about the cost? You and your forebears are nothing but illegals yourselves. These illegals you are talking about are hired by business men who know they are better workers than most americans and who will work for less with no benefits. They pay into the system but get nothing out of it. They are not ruining america. It’s folks with attitudes like you that are ruining this country.

      • Anonymous

        it is people like you who only get it when a two by four is used on them.

        • Anonymous

          Sounds like the Democratic Communist agenda.

          • carl loeffler

            You really sound like you don’t buy into all that right-wing propaganda with a statement like that.

    • Anonymous

      “Purists who would rather lose than adapt to change” Must be Hostess union employees

  • Anonymous

    The shrill extremism of the Tea Party, which is basically an angry evangelical subgroup of white America, is a major problem for true conservatism. The TP clings to white male superiority and prerogative, a narrow fanatic version of Christian faith, and a vicious immigration policy.

    Snowe left because of them, and so have other moderates. You need to get LePageism out of the Elephant. That’s how difficult the Republican journey will be.

    • Anonymous

      Snowe was more Democrat than Republican. Because someone is a Republican does not mean they are a Tea Partier (I am a Independent). It is unrotunate Democrats have gone far more towards the Liberal side, yes it gets them elected. At what cost. We shall see in 4 years, (though most of us know already)

      • Anonymous

        Her voting record would have her republican, solidly so.

        • Anonymous

          We can thank her for Obamacare. If she had not voted for it to come out of comm. it would not have happened. Some major stuff she sided with the Dems.

          • Anonymous

            We can thank the republican party for most of the ideas in the Affordable Care Act to begin with. These ideas were offered as an alternative to Hillary Clinton’s plans in the 1990s.

      • Oh Bruce…Snowe and Collins both have a career 75% voting record with their party. How many times must this be stated?

        The Democrats are closer to center on average than the Republicans. It’s really not close either.

        The extremism of the tea party is what lost Maine for the Republicans. And no, not every Republican is a tea partier, but many made the mistake of letting the extremists take control because they interpreted a fad as a long term shift. It is time for the moderate Republican to take back their party back.

        • Anonymous

          Center has moved so far, it isn’t center.

          • On the economic scale, center is center. Full socialism on the left, full capitalism on the right. We are not close to either pole thankfully, as such extremes (either one), would be detrimental.

            Despite lip service to the contrary, the GOP has never been allowed to pull too far right. Big spending and big government aren’t just for Democrats.

            However, if one looks at the social issues scale, there is an element that is beyond conservative – what I like to call regressive. This is the biggest difference, where the right is slipping further and further away from mainstream America.

            Are Democrats the perfect representatives for every demographic? No, but they obviously have a more universal appeal, for many reasons.

    • What a laugh. Webster has nothing to do with the tea party movement, in fact, he has been part of the crushing of the tea party movement in Maine. Calling Paul LePage tea party is a joke to since he is practically the adoptive son of Snowe (her late husband paid for his college).

      Oh yes and to call the tea party movement “angry envangelicals” is just ludicrous. The major tea party movement grouping, the TPP’s motto is “limited government, fiscal conservatism and the free market” nothing religious there. The tea party movement is not a religious Christian one but a fiscal movement. And suggesting it is racist is foolish too considering all the non-white/non-Christian people I know involved & who I worked with in my time with the TPP.

      • JohnR

        ” Calling Paul LePage tea party is a joke”

        He did however seek and attain the endorsement of the T’Bagger party, didn’t he?

      • The Ron Paul faction (which Webster opposed) and the Tea Party faction (which Webster supports) have often been lumped together, though it’s obvious to anyone who cares to examine honestly, that they are two distinct groups (with minimal overlap.) The former, more libertarian, the latter, originally started out libertarian, though devolved into racism, nativism/xenophobia and the religious right. Denial doesn’t change it. Sorry.

      • Anonymous

        And is that why the Tea Party’s signature piece of activism was demanding the President’s birth certificate?

        • Anonymous

          What is wrong with that? Considering that comments made by himself cast a bit of doubt as to where he was born.

          • Anonymous

            That doubt should have disappeared when the birth certificate was published and the republican leadership of Hawaii confirmed the facts at least twice. Under Hawaiian law no one is allowed access to the original without special permission, and the republican authorities of that state eventually had to begin charging a fee for copies due to the excessive demands of the ignorant who would not believe them. Any one who now doubts the facts has been dismissed by most Americans, and Orly Taitz, a Russian born foreigner and the main instigator of lawsuits, has had more cases dismissed than my dog has fleas.

      • Anonymous

        And there is a difference between fiscal movement and one that strangles a government that represents the people who voted it in.

      • Anonymous

        If extreme conservatives are not a problem for the Rupublican Party, please explain the platform.

      • Anonymous

        Interesting that the inception of the TP movement only occurs with the swearing in of our first black president. No coincidence there. No sireeeeee…….lol.

      • Anonymous

        and yet it was originally the teas “angry white men ” who elected him into that position..Deniability and damage control doesn’t work in the face of the facts.

    • Anonymous

      So, how would you describe the “Occupy” movement and their views.

      • Anonymous

        The occupy movement has no representatives in power. The tea party does.

  • Anonymous

    As a Democrat, it would be fine with me if the Republican Party stayed just the way they are.

    • carl loeffler

      Not me. I wish the rational, smart moderates would take back control from the wacked-out wingnuts and go back to the art of compromising in order to get something done.

  • Anonymous

    Wait – the Democrats stole 22 legislative seats? They weren’t elected?Did Charlie Webster write the caption?

  • Anonymous

    To be successful the Republican Party should be fiscally conservative increasing revenues and making the state bureaucracy more efficient. It needs to drop the ideological crap like murals and voter fraud and Obama care paranoia.

    It also needs to leave the moralizing over abortion and homosexuality out of its agenda. I think most people recognize that government is a good thing, especially if it delivers needed services efficiently while staying out of their private lives.

    • Anonymous

      Hear hear. Well put.

    • carl loeffler

      Bingo. You sunk that nail with one good swing of the hammer.

  • Anonymous

    The Republicans have done a lot of damage to the United States, just in my life time, Nixon taking us off the gold standard, Reagan began the shipping of our jobs oversees, and George W, Bush, the most horrible president took the Country to war with Iraq, which has bankrupt the country, Collins has bankrupted the U.S. Post Office, and we have Lepage, that is enough to never vote republican ever again.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t forget Clinton signed NAFTA, don’t forget Clinton let our men be dragged through Mogidishu. Obama, now what happned to our Ambassador while they watched on the big screen, I do not need to go back to Kennedy or Johnson putting Social Security in the budget. How about the mess we are in now? I have news that may startled Democrats, but both parties are to share the blame.

      • You’re right, there’s lot of blame to go around and lots of shameful incidents in both parties histories. Americans have played a role as well (though blaming ourselves is something one rarely sees.) Though I find it odd that you hold up SS as a bad thing.

        Clinton signed NAFTA and the Democrats for the most part got on board with it, but it was of Republican design.

        • Anonymous

          S.S. is alright, I don’t think they should of folded it in to the Federal Budget, and borrowed from it, and giving I.O.U.’s. It was their design, but I still disagreed with Nafta.

          • Anonymous

            If you didn’t like NAFTA, wait until the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement goes into effect. It received zero coverage during the campaign because both parties largely agree on it. Like endless war, the ever expanding police state, no real prosecutions for Wall Street malfeasance, and deficit hysteria, when both parties agree the press is blind, deaf, and dumb. Especially dumb.

  • Gary Libby

    Fairly or unfairly, the Republican Party has been branded with an extremist label, and many of the talking heads of the party (Coulter, Limbaugh) have not helped them to shake that label. Mainers tend to not like extremes.

    • Anonymous

      The label fits the Republican party because the extremist right wing Tea Party contingent has been allowed to take over the party. Currently, there are more nuts in the GOP than in a Snickers bar. Unless or until that changes, they will not be able to appeal to the rational voter. All the name-calling toward those who disagree with them does nothing to convince the voters that they are a viable political force.

      • Anonymous

        And as one of them said above: purge all the moderates who the extremist nuts call RINO’s, nothing but irrational name calling.

        If you can’t respect what the National media spokespersons and
        the bottom rung core supporter say, never mind the State leadership,

        how can you respect the Party they all say that they and only they represent, when no one ever says they don’t speak for me.?

        There is your problem.
        Good luck, especially when the very definition of the word ‘conservative’
        is fear of and resistance to change.

      • Anonymous

        Snicker bars are great, the republican party… not so much.

    • Anonymous

      They (many of that party) never disassociate themselves from those idiotic intemperate hysterical people like Coulter. They don’t seem to have the integrity and courage to criticize those like Limbaugh. Won’t take a stand.
      Jindal , Christie and others are starting to disassociate themselves from the divisive and ignorant comments of the former candidate Romney, though. Damage control….circling the wagons.

  • Anonymous

    The Republicans should run Charlie Webster against Paul LePage in the 2014 gubernatorial primary and stage ten debates between the two in all regions of the state. What better way could there be to display the Republican brand?

  • Anonymous

    ““Even if they did nothing, they should be sitting in a significantly
    improved position than this year,” he said, because off-year elections
    tend to draw more conservative, older voters. “

    R’s need to stop thinking “strategy”.

    ““But what is lost in the debate … is that the real failure of the
    Republican Party is its loss of ability to relate to many voters, its
    inability to identify with them. What is really needed isn’t more
    conservatism or more moderation, but more understanding, more connection
    with the voters and more serious statesmanship.”

    When you “claim” to “represent the people “, you better be sure you REALLY do..Other wise voters will give you a thumping every time!!!
    ADS and money do not win elections. Only one thing does— actually DOING the voters WILL.

    • Anonymous

      The Republicans (Romney campaign) thought they could win with all the super PAC money (Adelson,etc.) and all the ads. There were tons of anti Obama ads in just the last week of the election here in Maine….over and over again…..saturated the airwaves. A lot of good it did them! They thought a lot of the Democrats would not get out and vote this time. Another miscalculation. And their computer system (with all their money) broke down on election night. It left the workers at the Boston headquarters running around not knowing what to do and what was going on. Unbelievable.

      • Anonymous

        The more I saw the blatantly false republican ads, the more motivated I became to get to the polls. I suspect other democrats, and independents had a similar reaction.

  • Anonymous

    Permanent minority status.

    We have seen their true colors.

    No thanks.

    Yessah

  • Anonymous

    we need to do what the Dems do when THEY lose an election…..they accept the smaller govt, lower taxes, self responsibility, adventures in capitalism……no wait…they dont do that, but they want the republicans to change thier core beliefs…..

    • Anonymous

      It would be good if the republicans returned to the values they had before the neocons gained control, which occurred sometime between Reagan and GW Bush.

  • Anonymous

    The Republican Party has gone to hell in a hand basket! As a first time delegate I came away from the unorganized, shenanigan filled caucus knowing that I could no longer be part of the party……Absolutely disgraceful!

  • Poliquin or Cebra as the new Republican Party Chairman? Cebra seen as a “healer”? If this is an indication of what the Republicans learned from this election, they’re in deeper doo doo than even the results suggest.

  • Anonymous

    The Democratic Party is the only true Melting Pot Party, the Republicans have taken this stance that it wants to be a rich white party, which is wrong, they do not want to help the poor, sick, less fortunate, they are still want to exclude non-whites, or other religions, and any people they think do not measure up to the evangelist scrutiny, well, I must say, we are a melting pot country, and we must have a Melting Pot Party that seperates religion and state, and respects all Americans, for our greatness comes from all our ideas. We need to undo the wall street/republican deleting of our jobs, and the causing of the middle class to struggle so.

  • JohnR

    It is fitting and telling that just under the headline of “What’s next for the Maine Republican Party” there is a map looking down on the State from space. This does not do justice to how far off the planet (Kolob) these loons are, but if you click the reduce button 6 times you are getting closer. Oh, this will only work for non-republicans sorry, for some reason they have chosen not to even believe in science or technology. To them the earth is still flat. So what is next for Maine republicans here are what some of their peers have done for review
    A pregnant Arizona woman was so furious with her husband for failing to vote that she ran him down with the family’s Jeep.
    Holly Solomon blamed her husband for President Obama’s re-election,
    and felt so strongly about it that after a heated argument she chased
    her husband around a parking lot in the car, plowed into him, and pinned
    him to the pavement. She’s been arrested and charged with domestic
    violence. http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/valleyfever/2012/11/obama_reelection_mitt_romney_gilbert_daniel_solomon.php
    Then of course there is this one from again the nutty south, but don’t be afraid of imports.
    A Florida man who warned that he might harm himself if Barack Obama won
    the presidency was found dead two days after the election of an apparent
    self-inflicted drug overdose.
    Henry Hamilton, 64, was discovered dead in his home on Nov. 8 alongside
    two empty bottles of prescription drugs and a living will on which he’d
    written “Do not revive! F— Obama!”
    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/man-article-1.1201911#ixzz2CQyiJk00

    ROFLMAO! I am sure your party will come up with some more entertaining and enlightening methods to deal with your loss.

    • Anonymous

      It’s not nice to laugh about tragedy, like a depressed mentally ill individual committing suicide. I guess if the victim is a conservative, that’s just fine by you, John R. Please do not flag this post for removal. Best to keep it up to give insight into your and those that think like you thought processes.

      • JohnR

        Please do rejoin your cult members as they await the comet that will take them away to Kolob. Don’t forget to pack your meds. As to your feigned disgust…………well PFFFFFFFFFFfffffffffffffffffffft……..ROFL! Still waiting for Ted the “diaper” Nugent to fulfill his promise to America. So there is no danger of you guys becoming extinct…….. unfortunately.

  • Anonymous

    a simple answer,oblivion….

  • Anonymous

    Why take any of Matthew Gagnon’s advice? He was predicting wins for Republicans all around and was denouncing Democrats all around — now suddenly he has a different attitude in defeat? He’s grown so much wiser? Please.

    They criticized and nearly demonizing Democrats for reaching out to all groups of people, they called that pandering. How insulting! You have real concerns and your legislators are listening, then the other guy (who wants your vote), cheapens your wins and calls it a simple act of pandering? These guys need some serious self-reflection. It’s ridiculous that any Republican strategist is thinking he has the answers right now.

    • Anonymous

      Gagnon’s predictions have turned out to be meaningless.

      • Anonymous

        He certainly predicted question #1 correctly. He certainly isn’t and hasn’t been a big fan of Charlie Webster, or to a point, of Paul LePage. I hardly ever agree with Matt, but I will say he is looking for answers and not blame.

  • Anonymous

    The Democratic Party, the Melting Pot Party

  • Anonymous

    The Democratic Party, the Melting Pot Party,
    as opposed to the Republican Party, the white can of paint with a a white brush

  • Anonymous

    They might want to start with a “Race Relations” class!

  • Anonymous

    Maine, once along with Vermont, the most Republican of states lost many of its loyal party members when : Nixon promoted the racist “Southern Strategy , they “adopted ” religious fanatics for their vote , disavowed science ,and teamed up with the reactionary T- Party.
    A T-Party version of the downfall of our country that the first socialist president was Abraham Lincoln ( Homestead Act, Land Grant College Act, Transcontinental RR, etc.), followed by Teddy Roosevelt – the Trust buster and Panama Canal and Eisenhower and the Interstate System is enough too turn off most thinking people

    The Republican’s have a long way to go to win back Maine’s moderate economic and social centrists.

    • Anonymous

      Can economics really be separated from social issues? Is welfare an economic or social issue? If by “social” you mean “morality” then I’d argue that Maine is socially liberal/left. First (along with Maryland) to allow SSM by popular vote. Maine was one of the first states to abolish the death penalty in the 19th century and still one of only 16 that lack it. Then we’ve got support for the underground railroad, temperance, suffrage, etc. We even allow incarcerated prisoners to vote! Makes me proud that Maine adopted me 31 years ago.

  • Anonymous

    What kind of crap is this in the caption: “Not counting two recounts, Democrats stole 22 seats from Republicans”? No one “owns” any of the seats in the Legislature. No seat in the legislature can be stolen. What conservative BS!

  • What the Maine GOP needs to do is get rid of the rinos and establish a moral compass. Let the rinos go to the democrats, when you have a rotten foundation before you can fix the house you must replace the foundation.

    The Maine GOP needs to stand for something, something of value.

  • Anonymous

    honorable seppuku

  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous

    The Republicans just need to sit back and do nothing and let the Democrats spend Maine into obliviian with no way out and then we will see how the voters react.

  • Anonymous

    Analysis: Wait, give it a few months, then reflect on the dems and their win.

  • Anonymous

    What party would you be part of if you wore a sheet over your head and burned crosses in the middle of the night? Ask Charlie Webster……….

    • Anonymous

      For the purpose of your historical information the KKK was made up of southern democrats.

      • Anonymous

        who are now republicans

        • Anonymous

          News flash….the KKK is nonexistent anymore

          • Anonymous

            news flash you don’t get out enough. maybe you should read a paper or watch the news

  • Anonymous

    what is next for the republicans? irrelevance and mpotence

  • Anonymous

    “But politics is actually about identity. …” and the level of disconnect between the elected and the electorate is huge.

    It is imperative that human identity under either a conservative or Progressive power structure be respected for what it is…the Power and Will of the People. Progresssives know this already. They are painfully aware that they are ideologically way out in left field and will therefore opportunistically and politically co-opt the very conservative principles which conservatives choose to not utter (out of fear of rejection) just until they win the political race. The pattern predicts they will then reject the reality and blame their conservative opponents for the very conservatism which they eloquently lip-synch as was necessary.

    Children and animals know truth and love when they see and feel either as demonstrated with the affirmation of life which brought the black lab Molly home to her home after fleeing the accident as reported in the headlines of the Bangor Daily News. The logic of conservatism is nowhere in these emotional twists of daily life despite its universal truth and should only be approached by loving adults who are capable of manifesting it with proper application.

    The fork in the road needs to be presented to voters for what it is. The choice is theirs as to whether they want to enslave themselves into dependency by forfeiting their rights to the progressive ideology… or… to affirm their rights as enumerated within the founding documents of our country, born out of …..abject disrespect of humanity.
    The founders understood the individual. Are we capable of the same?

  • Anonymous

    It’s official, Maine has become Massachusetts. After years of the influx of people

    from away, the conservative nature of politics in the state have taken a liberal
    bent(especially on the gold coast) that signals the end of rational political thought

    for the majority of Mainers. A red state awaits for the few who are not caught up
    in the liberal lie’s.

  • castinem8

    The Independents and Dems must work together in 2014 to defeat LePage. Do not split the vote.

  • Anonymous

    What’s next for Maine Republicans? Perhaps they’ll pool all their greedy, mean spirited republican dollars, reopen the defunct Hostess plant in Biddeford and rehire the 300 workers that lost thier jobs listening to the left wing union bosses.

  • Anonymous

    I understood the word conservative to mean, unchanging. Someone who wants to conserve things like the environment, yet the party is not known to be environmental.

    Republicans also preach smaller government, or get the government out of the way, yet are asking for things such as abortion and marriage to be federal laws.

    Maine citizens are very conservative when it comes to their federal legislators. It seems no one leaves until they retire.

    I think one of the biggest problems republicans face is their own hipocrisy.

    Many people also like a legislation to offset the governor or president. To fullfil a balance, i.e. They need to find common ground or agree to get anything to go through.

  • Anonymous

    The caption under the maps reads:

    “Not counting two recounts, Democrats stole 22 seats from Republicans, while Republicans flipped seven seats and snagged one vacant seat.”

    This makes it sound like there was something underhanded in the way Democrats won their races. I don’t recall any news about anyone, from either side, “stealing” the election…

    I wish reporters wouldn’t resort to this kind of colorful language, but just report what happened in clear, accurate language.

  • Anonymous

    Margaret Chase Smith’s Conservative Republican Party is dead, dead and buried underneath a pile of hate filled, racist, borderline intellectual functioning reactionaries who refuse to see their imminent demise laid out plainly in front of them. Their refusal to acknowledge their racist and hate filled rhetoric is ingrained and will never change.

  • Anonymous

    “We must be ready to embrace more women, and we must be ready to embrace more young people, and we must be ready to embrace more leadership, not less.”

    You can be ready to embrace all that you want, the problem is as long as your message is more about being involved in social affairs that are none of your business your embrace will be void of any additional voters.

  • Lazerus Phoenix

    A better questions would be; What’s next for the Democrat party?
    After all, once you have given everything away, and the money has run out, what do you do next to buy votes????

  • Anonymous

    It is not D’s or R’s or progressives or conservatives that America is all about. It is knowing that we are Americans and that God is in control, as He always has been, is now and always will be. Those in leadership are there because He allows them to be. He even uses those who do not believe in Him to accomplish His ends, and the wake-up calls have been many.

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