October 20, 2017
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Comments for: New wind farm completed in Hancock County

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  • Anonymous

    Power for 18,000 homes is a good thing.
    almost $ 350,000 annually in payments to

    the area.
    What is the cost per Kwh this array delivers?
    That is something I havent seen yet.

    • Anonymous

      If you factor in the cost of the construction, the cost of the tax credit and the cost of the connection to the grid you are looking at about 16 cents per kWh. That is almost double the cost of a natural gas plant quadruple that of a hydro plant all in.

      • Anonymous

        Ummm… The Governor’s Task Force on wind power stated that the Rollins (Maine) wind project produced power @ 5.5 cents per kWh.

        Maine’s Standard Offer rates have gone DOWN 2 years in a row – even though hundreds of MW of new wind power capacity were added to Maine’s grid.

        Wind power is a good thing for Maine rate payers.

        Please try to keep up.

        Yessah

        • Anonymous

          Standard offer is going down due to competition and well controlled PUC. Less govt and more competition drives energy prices. When you calculate the the cost of electricity you must factor in the subsidies or you will sell yourself short. Wind and solar have limited applications and terrible paybacks/ROI. Hydro is currently the only viable green energy alternative.

          • Anonymous

            But LePage keeps telling us that renewable power is driving the cost of electricity UP.

            Even as rates go DOWN.

            He wouldn’t lie to us would he?

            Would he?

            Oh yes he would.

            BTW – wind power underbids gas-fired electricity all the time in ISO NE and elsewhere.

            Yessah

        • Anonymous

          if money means so much to you, how about moving to Boston or New York

        • Anonymous

          Fact Check:

          The Rollins wind project had not even been permitted, much less built, when the Governor’s Task Force on Wind Power issued its final report in early 2008.

          Electricity is currently cheaper because the price of natural gas (which generates most of our electricity) has decreased dramatically.

          Maine is a part of and is served by the New England grid. It is not a stand alone grid. Those “hundreds” of MW of wind power (operating at an average 30% annual capacity factor) represent a very small fraction of New England’s – or Maine’s – electric energy production.

          Wind power contributed just 0.6% of New England’s electricity last year – hardly enough to impact overall electricity prices at this point. Wind power has not been a good thing for ratepayers in many places where it is more prevalent. Hard to understand how the commenter can be so certain that it will be in Maine.

          http://www.tax-news.com/news/Germany_Eyes_Special_Levy_On_Eco_Energy_Providers____57124.html

          • Anonymous

            Ummm….this is one I was referring to…

            http://www.maine.gov/energy/pdf/Binder1.pdf

            ” Maine has entered into one long term wind contract since 2008 (Rollins Wind Project). This contract is based on a discount off the hourly real time wholesale market prices with a $55/MWh floor price escalating to a $65/MWh floor price.”

            Yessah

          • Anonymous

            And the next sentence from that report is: “The MPUC reported on February 13, 2012 that the first six months of the Rollins contract added $953,000 in above market costs to electric rates (~ $1.9 million per year).”

            That particular contract was not a free market contract but was mandated by the Maine PUC in an effort to prop up wind development when no one was showing any interest in investing in First Wind’s project. CMP objected to being forced into this contract but was forced into it anyway under provisions within state law.

    • clamcove

      But these things are only operable about 20% of the time based on watching them in motion. Plus, we’re shipping half the power we generate to Mass. Re-do your math and perhaps you will see the reality behind the fog.

    • Anonymous

      and how much did it cost to set up?
      how much money was “extracted” from the taxpayers to support angus’s precious money maker wind project?

  • Anonymous

    Isn’t this refreshing news. Now that the project is complete 18,000 homes will be supplied with electricity provided by Mother Nature…. and a added bonus was the the project was actually completed AHEAD of schedule! It is nice to know that the state of Maine is seeking new ways to meet our energy needs. Hopefully this trend will continue with more and more people climbing on board. Perhaps eventually we will be able to free ourselves from having to rely on all the oil barons in the world today…. who are controlling both the worlds economy and many political policies as well.

    • Anonymous

      Hey numby, this power is being provided to Mass not maine, we get the visual blight on the landscape and the people in Mass get the power…..Are you still mad at those cavemen who burnt trees to stay warm……

      • Anonymous

        Nice way to reply to a comment by starting with the name calling of someone you don’t even know. You are missing the point big time! This IS a step in the right direction. It does not matter where this energy is being directed as long as we are freeing ourselves from being dependent on the oil barons of the world. I am for any means of alternative energy. By the way I’ve been keeping my home warm by burning nothing but wood for over 30 years. Global warming IS NOT a scam …. we need to seek new ways to meet our energy demands.

        • Anonymous

          Sorry to come off so mean it was inappropriate.Wind is not the answer. I’m an energy engineer, Payback for a wind project is over 19 years not to mention the eyesore. China has no policy for energy, we should worry about our own energy independence and let the rest globe invest in failed technologies. The best green energy? Hydro bar none. Then why are we removing dams? Well Angus helped tear down the dams and recommended we put in wind turbines….who has ties to the wind industry? Angus……imagine that. Wind, Solar and tidal generation have limited useful applications….very limited.

          • Anonymous

            Wrong – China is investing heavily in on- and off-shore wind and solar (thermal and PV).

            http://cleantechnica.com/2012/09/11/renewable-energy-investment-attractiveness-china-continues-at-1-us-suffers-from-policy-slump-germany-climbs-to-2/

            China plans to add 100,000 MW of new wind power capacity and 21,000 MW of new solar (PV) capacity to its grid by 2015.

            Maine wind projects have more than replaced the power lost when the Edwards and Fort Halifax dams were removed.

            Please try to keep up.

            Yessah

          • Anonymous

            And China has also stated that its carbon emissions will continue to increase beyond 2035. It’s also shopping around the world for new fossil fuel sources in which to invest to feed its appetite.

          • Anonymous

            I appreciate and accept your apology. I feel as though wind is not the only answer and that we should incorporate the means of ALL forms of alternative energy. Our energy demands will only increase as time goes on and our populations increase…. it is inevitable. Anything that can be done to decrease our dependency on oil is a good thing. The wind farms can be viewed as an eye sore by some folks …. but I like the way they look more so than an oil rig …. not to mention the fact that if a wind turbine fails it will not bring about the catastrophe that BP produced in the Gulf or that EXXON produced in Alaska. There is no question that Hydro can play an important role in meeting our new energy concerns …. it has proven itself already. Perhaps if just a portion of each form of alternative energy were incorporated we could cut our over all dependency on oil….. at least enough so that the mid east countries don’t have us by the family jewels.

          • Yes but Angus is nice and he will hug us on his way to the bank.

        • Anonymous

          Have you ever considered that wind (solar or any other green energy) could just REPLACE the oil barons? I’m not trying to start a war here, as I HATE my oil bill too. I’m just not sold on decorating every mountaintop in Maine with these ugly windmills when MAINE energy costs only go up, no matter what the source.

          • Anonymous

            I agree with everything you have said. A little bit of solar, a little bit hydro, etc. It will all have a contributing effect on decreasing our dependency on oil. Trust me when I tell you that I love the natural beauty we have been blessed with here in our great state. I do not want to see every ridge in the state populated with wind turbines either. I did not want to see cell towers on the tops of mountains as well …. but I like having a cell phone. Perhaps those floating wind farms way off shore is the solution for wind.Personally I think we our not utilizing solar anywhere enough in this country. There are different green alternatives in different parts of the country. The next time you fly into a sun drenched state peek out the window of the plane and try and locate solar panels on the roofs of the homes and businesses. Sad to say that the amount of swimming pools out number the solar panels by a vast amount. It is just mind boggling that the folks down there are not on the solar band wagon yet. Especially when they are running air conditioners most of the year. No matter what the solution is we are all going to have to make some changes in the future to meet our growing energy demands.

          • Anonymous

            I just wonder with all of the $ spent on R and D why there is still not a viable solar solution. Don’t you wish you could buy a panel or series of panels, install them on your roof and have free sustainable power? I just don’t see that happening now or in the foreseeable future. I hope I’m wrong.

            If it ever did happen, those owning the patents to the panels would simply charge so much that they would in effect become the new “oil barons”. I just don’t see any easy answer. Sprinkling, a little of this and a little of that as alternative energy seems expensive to me. In Maine, our dependency on foreign oil AND expensive electricity IS a huge part of keeping the masses poor with little hope of modern factories relocating to Maine for that reason. Like him or loathe him, Gov. LePage has been a strong spokesman on this issue.

            I know I’m probably in the minority on this, but I’d like to see a feasibility study on a new nuclear plant in Washington County. A new nuke there would serve as cheaper, cleaner energy and bring MUCH needed good jobs to the area. One thing for sure, at this point in time there appears to be no single perfect solution.

          • Anonymous

            agreed …. there is not a perfect solution as there are few things in life that ARE perfect forever. That is probably a good thing as our lives would be pretty boring if everything were perfect all the time and things always stayed the same.If we are not moving forward we are moving backwards due to the fact that the world is in a state of constant change. We need to make the changes that are needed …. nothing will stay the same forever. Many of us do not like changes but change is inevitable We did not develop our dependency on oil over night and the solutions will not appear over night either. There is hope though …. as more and more people are accepting the fact that our dependency on oil is not a good thing … for environmental, economic and political reasons.

          • Anonymous

            So, can you provide the details on how mountaintop windmills in Maine are going to substantially impact oil consumption locally or nationally? I’d like to see your information. I appreciate your concern for our energy stewardship, but you seem to dwell on the ideological with little attention to the factual. Any given wind project in Maine is a tiny contributor to our overall energy portfolio and will have no meaningful impact on our total oil consumption. If you have details showing otherwise, I’d love to see them.

            The question is not really whether wind power is good or bad. Rather, it’s more about whether it actually provides enough energy or environmental benefits to warrant the intrusion on our landscape or the people who will be forced to live amongst industrial wind turbines in their formally rural and scenic communities. If you can show why our landscape and people should be ignored – using facts and quantitative data – please do so! Others advocating for widespread mountaintop wind development in Maine haven’t been able or haven’t even tried.

          • Anonymous

            Sorry, no I cannot provide you with the data that you are seeking. Although I can’t help but feel as though there is the possibility that some of the energy that those wind turbines produce could be implemented in heating hot water and supplying electric heat to some people who are currently using oil for those needs ( that is if the information pertaining to 19 turbines being able to meet the energy needs of 18,000 homes is correct). I feel as though you are most likely correct in thinking that the mountain top wind farm trade offs are not worth it. Thank you for the enlightenment! As I stated in a previous comment perhaps an alternative to mountain top wind farms would be the floating wind farm that is currently being researched at the Univ. of Maine. I think that we should not right off wind as part of the solution and that we should be opened minded to the potential it has. Please take a few minutes to check out the link below. http://www.forbes.com/sites/anthonykosner/2011/12/16/frack-that-the-innovators-in-maine-have-plans-to-power-the-entire-state-with-offshore-wind/

          • Anonymous

            I read the linked article – I’ve been following offshore wind news for some time and believe it deserves a look and an honest assessment. But there are those who are trying to lock us into long term commitments to deepwater offshore wind before the first floating test projects are even in place. That’s not research, that’s politics. I don’t think any form of renewable energy should be taken off the table without a close examination. But, once we’ve examined them, we have to be honest about what they can and cannot do rather than pushing them forward zealously for political reasons or to appease some special interest group. If they go forward, they should go forward on their proven merits alone. Believe me, I’m with you in hopes for a clean energy future, but we have to start by being honest with ourselves. Wind and solar might have a place in our future, but under present technology, they come with some significant handicaps and impacts that are being glossed over by those promoting them.

      • Anonymous

        Where did you hear that? This says otherwise: http://www.firstwind.com/projects/bull-hill

      • Anonymous
    • Anonymous

      “…supplied with electricity provided by Mother Nature…”
      Uh, not plugging fossil fuels here, but you do know that Mother Nature also made oil, coal and natural gas, don’t you?

  • Anonymous

    Right on !

  • Anonymous

    didnt see where the power is going in this article,so how do you know?

  • Anonymous

    When the Government incentives dry up First wind will be gone aolng with the wind I came across Schoppee hil the other night and saw that all these lights were blinking at the same time on all towers. THey are kind of an eyesore

    • Anonymous

      folks should take a plane ride over where these things are, it might change their minds

  • Anonymous

    Great now shut it down and build other farms. The construction of these mills are the only benefit Maine gets. The power goes to Mass we get higher rates to subsidize these farms.Thank you Mr King.

  • Anonymous

    (Sarcasm Alert)

    Can’t wait for the huge reduction on my electricity bill.

    I seem to remember as they were building the nuke plants that we were told that the power produced would be so inexpensive that it would be virtually free.

    Ayuh, can’t wait for those wind turbines to start whirling.

  • Anonymous

    Had a conversation with one of the lobbyists for wind power.Intro’s himself as a consultant that handles the subsidies for first wind.He also resides in Mass now.He stressed Mainers need to realize the need for increases to subsidies for wind power.Still trying to figure out how my paying higher subsides and not getting the product helps me.Though i am still learning liberal 101 Where 2 +2= 6 I guess this is part of the new redistribution program.

    • Anonymous

      not to worry, Maine’s taxpayers will get the shaft

  • Anonymous

    what a shame to mar Maine’s beautiful landscape with these horrible windmills.Some day people will wake up as to what is happening, by then it will be to late

    • Anonymous

      It’s already too late.
      and i sincerely doubt people will wake up.
      Let’s face it, they just elected the man that was responsible for the wind farm shenanigans into the vacant senatorial seat.

      • Anonymous

        the election was an all around disaster

        ajants

  • Anonymous

    With all the wind turbines that there are in Maine just how many home could they run ? Here is another one once they get the under water turbines refined they could put quit a few in the rivers of Maine . I can think one river the Kennebec up in Bingham for wyman dam to the concord bridge

  • Anonymous

    Refreshing news? Not to me. It’s another sad episode in the soap opera of wind developers turning northern Maine’s hills into an industrial zone. I feel so bad for the abbutters who will hear and see the turbines, the line of flashing strobes that will go on all night, all at once, every single night of the year. I hope no one suffers from wind turbine syndrome from the infrasound. Now FW is planning to expand the project, even after telling LURC they had no plans to do so. I heard their attorney say so. For me, ‘refreshing’ is not the right adjective. Good luck to the people of the area who will have to live with the ever-expanding scourge. Thank you to all those who stood up and asked the government to prevent it.

  • Penny Gray

    How much did this project cost to construct? How much of this cost was funded by Maine taxpayers in the form of subsidies and grants? How much will Maine ratepayers be charged for the transmission lines these industrial projects will require? How much will it cost the town to dismantle these monsters in 20 years (or earlier)? Where are all the turbine blades going to be recycled? What about all these industrial wind projects being in violation of the federal migratory bird act and the endangered species act (golden eagles) and the bald eagle protection act? More information, please, before we buy into this unproven energy source.

  • Anonymous

    Article says the windmills have the capacity for 18,000 homes but I would lover to see what they actually produce. This would be perfect conditions all year long. I bet if we got half of this capacity we would be lucky but with all the gov’t subsidies why not build them.

  • Anonymous

    Time to fleece the public with increased electrical costs!

  • Anonymous

    Let’s look objectively at this article, which sounds more like a First Wind press release than it does– an unbiased news piece.

    “A new, 19-turbine wind farm in Hancock County, which has the capacity to supply the average energy needs of 18,000 homes…”

    The turbine facility has the ‘capacity’ to provide the energy needs for 18,000 homes. But… does it have the ABILITY?

    Capacity factors are based on what a wind energy facility COULD produce, were it to operate at maximum ‘capacity’ under optimum circumstances. That means it must generate electricity 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Wind facilities have been built all around the globe, and yet… there isn’t single one which operates at ‘capacity’. Here in Maine, wind turbine facilities produce closer to 22%- 27% of their rated ‘capacity’.

    And yet… citizens never hear the realistic projections or the actual production
    figures. No. These numbers are kept from the public, hidden behind the arguments of ‘proprietary information’ or ‘trade secrets’.

    If we were generous and allowed the Bull Hill facility a 30% capacity factor, those ‘18,000 homes’ would be quickly reduced to 5,400 homes.

    At what cost has this inefficient, intermittent and unreliable energy source come to be built?

    How much of the ‘investment’ made by First Wind came from private
    investors or their own working capital?

    Would citizens—tax-payers and rate-payers, alike– balk to know how many
    tens of millions of their OWN dollars have been handed over to this out-of-state,
    for-profit corporation?

    The Bull Hill project was approved for construction in an Unorganized
    Territory. There was no organized town government which could ask its citizens to vote ‘yea’ or ‘nay’ for the project.

    This article states: “With the facility operating, Hancock County and Eastbrook will receive an average aggregate tax payment of about $100,000 annually for the next 20 years and an additional $240,000 annually in community benefit payments, for a total of more than $7 million.”

    The press release/article hints that Eastbrook was in favor of the project. And yet, on the website for Eastbrook Wind, this quote is found:

    “First Wind originally had hoped to erect additional turbines in neighboring Eastbrook as part of the same project, which prompted the town to develop land use standards for commercial wind turbines. The company was unable to work out agreements with enough adjacent landowners to be able to extend the project into
    Eastbrook, however.”

    http://www.eastbrookwind.com/

    Yes, Eastbrook residents, who COULD enact a wind development ordinance, voted in OPPOSITION to First Wind’s proposed project.

    Maine media and its reporters MUST practice due diligence and do at least a minimum of research about the facts behind a ‘story’ before publishing corporate press releases. If they are unwilling to do so, they should be considered PR mouthpieces rather than ‘news media’.

  • Downeasta

    Anyone for federal regulations on our bills once again? This fiasco of lower costs through competition was a pipe dream at best.

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