December 12, 2017
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Comments for: Sangerville teen admits to robbery, burglaries

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  • Anonymous

    We will be reading about him in the future…

    • Anonymous

       Im sure he is just getting warmed up.
       Great !!!!

  • Bill Cat

    Good Lawd, what’s wrong with this boy anyhow?    Too many gangster movies or what?  Of course, it’ll turn out that the poor kid has ADD & ADHD and EIEIO because his mother was his oldest sister and his father was a YooHoo bottler who went apeshit.  Did I miss anything, was he under-privileged or led astray?  Might be as simple as the lad went-off and truly screwed-up, no need to try to blame anybody else.

  • Anonymous

    unbelievable. Somethings gotta give

  • Anonymous

    You  can come up with all the acronyms…ADD,     ADHD…..whatever…..     The bottom line is this:  If this child is ever going to be corrected,   if he is ever going to learn his lesson,   then you need to punish him or her,     but not banish them from society.     If you think about it ..society as it is,  is what makes them….  divorce, negligence, and uprooting (moving all of the time)  ….all play a role.    And then they are supposed  to interact in  school…..and society?     I’m not making an excuse,   I’m trying to point out that facts are facts,  people don’t treat people humanely,   especially  those that are most vunerable.  The aged and disabled are not treated that much differently…  If you want to change someone’s life,  then you need to be positive towards change.   Jail is climatic….but’s it’s also negative.   By putting a kid in jail is simply telling him or her that there is no confidence in their ability to make a change.

    • Anonymous

      Do you have a point to your always-mesmerizing ramblings! Too wishy-washy sociological mush for me. Are you lonely! Visit the local jail!

    • Anonymous

      Ya know some people actually do change just by being imprisoned for their crimes , sometimes it takes more than once. But some people finally realize that crime doe’s not pay and decide to live a free life and earn their way like the rest of society-Not everyone in jail needs special help–As a matter of fact if they keep going back there after tasting the life of imprisonment–Then they belong there —Your comment makes little sense

    • Anonymous

       what, exactly, do you think his punishment should be?

      • Anonymous

        I was responding to another poster who simply said to throw the kid in jail and toss the key. My point is that if the Dept. of Corrections (emphasis on “corrections” is going to actually correct a person’s behavior, it’s more possible for it to happen in this instance rather than with an adult.

        • Anonymous

          it’s a shame the jails for juveniles don’t have more programs to help the kids, so they would have a better chance when they got out. Then again, who knows if it would really help in the long run. So sad to see young people go so wrong…

          • Anonymous

            Some years ago the governor of Massachusetts closed all the reform schools.  of the 500o children confined in these places, it was determined that fewer than 100 needed “secure treatment.”

            If you are interested “Last one over the wall” By Jerome Miller (Ohio University press) gives the total run down on this subject.  “Children in Trouble, a National Scandal” by Howard James (late of the Christian Science Monitor) also discusses the issue of locked up juveniles and how we ought change the system.

            The late Francsis Ordway former superintendent of the Lyman State Training School for boys in Westborough Massachusetts once stated: “For most confined juveniles it would be far better if they were never apprehended, tried and confined as too many of them get worse in our care”

          • Anonymous

            in a lot of ways I agree with that last quote, unfortunately is seems nothing in the country ever really changes so I don’t have a lot of hope things will get better for them.

  • Anonymous

    The boy is moving on up………………….

  • Anonymous

    For over 4,000 of human history we have tried “The Punishment response”  I guess slapping people who misbehave around makes the society feel good, but are we safer?

    4,000 years of jailing, beheading, flogging, and humiliation, and what have we accomplished?  Our society today is more crime prone, more hostile, and more seperated than ever in human history.

    Maybe we should try something new?

    • Anonymous

      If you knew where this kid came from and his family, you’d understand perfectly why this happened; the kid never stood a chance………….  You are a product of your environment, good or bad…………………….

      What would you suggest we try differently?

      • Anonymous

        Gee, you answered your own question… change the enviornment. 

        • Anonymous

          Great answer, but how?  Families no longer can dicipline a child without fear of government intervention, and look where it’s got us………..  It seems that kids today have no moral value or sense of responsibility…………….  I agree, the change needs to start with the family structure………….  Once an apple becomes rotten, it ultimately decays……….  Maybe society needs to change; but again I ask; how? 

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