September 21, 2017
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Comments for: Pay equity is sound economic policy, matter of basic fairness

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  • Anonymous

    Re: “male business majors earned a little more than $45,000 on average, compared with $38,000 for female business majors.”

    Here’s why in just one example of why on average even the most sophisticated, educated women earn less than men even in the exact same profession:

    “In 2011, 22% of male physicians and 44% of female physicians worked less than full time, up from 7% of men and 29% of women from Cejka’s 2005 survey.” http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2012/03/26/bil10326.htm

    A thousand laws won’t cure that.

    In truth, no law yet has closed the gender wage gap — not the 1963 Equal Pay for Equal Work Act, not Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, not the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act, not the 1991 amendments to Title VII, not affirmative action (which has benefited mostly white women, who share their wealth and affirmative action benefits with white men – http://tinyurl.com/74cooen), not diversity, not the countless state and local laws and regulations, not the horde of overseers at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and not the Ledbetter Fair Pay Act…. Nor will a “paycheck fairness” law work.

    That’s because women’s pay-equity advocates, who always insist one more law is needed, continue to overlook the effects of female AND male behavior:

    Despite the 40-year-old demand for women’s equal pay, millions of wives still choose to have no pay at all. In fact, according to Dr. Scott Haltzman, author of “The Secrets of Happily Married Women,” stay-at-home wives, including the childless who represent an estimated 10 percent, constitute a growing niche. “In the past few years,” he says in a CNN report at http://tinyurl.com/6reowj, “many women who are well educated and trained for career tracks have decided instead to stay at home.”

    (“Census Bureau data show that 5.6 million mothers stayed home with their children in 2005, about 1.2 million more than did so a decade earlier….” at http://tinyurl.com/qqkaka. Consider also: “a 2007 Pew Study on working mothers revealed that 60 percent of full-time working moms would rather be part-time — up from 48 percent 15 years ago” at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peggy-drexler/dont-call-him-mr-mom-the_b_1573895.html.)
     
    If indeed women are staying at home at a higher rate, perhaps it’s largely because feminists and the media have told women for years that female workers are paid less than men in the same jobs — so why bother working if they’re going to be penalized and humiliated for being a woman.
     
    As full-time mothers or homemakers, stay-at-home wives earn zero. How can they afford to do this while in many cases living in luxury? Because they’re supported by their husband, an “employer” who pays them to stay at home.

    The implication of this is probably obvious to 12-year-olds but seems incomprehensible to or is ignored by feminists and the liberal media: If millions of wives are able to accept NO wages, millions of other wives, whose husbands’ incomes range from moderate to high, are able to:

    -accept low wages
    -refuse overtime and promotions
    -choose jobs based on interest first, wages second — the reverse of what men tend to do
    -take more unpaid days off
    -avoid uncomfortable wage-bargaining (http://tinyurl.com/3a5nlay)
    -work part-time instead of full-time

    All of which lower women’s median pay.

    Women are able to make these choices because they are supported — or if unmarried anticipate being supported — by a husband who must earn more than if he’d chosen never to marry. (Still, even many men who shun marriage, unlike their female counterparts, feel their self worth is tied to their net worth.) This is how MEN help create the wage gap: as a group they pass up jobs that interest them for ones that pay well. If the roles were reversed so that men raised the children and women raised the income, men would average lower pay than women.

    From “Will the Ledbetter Act Help Women?” at http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2011/12/03/will-the-ledbetter-fair-pay-act-help-women/

    See also Christina Hoff Sommers’ commentary ‘Wage Gap Myth Exposed — By Feminists” http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christina-hoff-sommers/wage-gap_b_2073804.html

    • Narsbars

      You forget one thing…………facts. The studies showing pay inequity are based on the same pay for  the same job, hours worked, positions held,  for the largest part.
      So, if women were unable to choose how they wanted to work I suppose employers would then just decide to pay them equally?
      Please take this load of steaming trash and give a Union employee a job collecting it and bringing it to a green recycling center. A Union a woman will put this where it belongs.

  • Anonymous

    Wow you worked real hard on that reply.  Your comment goes back to the 50’s.  Just my opinion.

  • Yawningattrolls

    Funny – I was in the workforce for 40 years and I’ve never saw pay disparity based on sex for the same job – what a myth and BS……..

  • Anonymous

    As a manager, when the famous substance hit the fan and daunting tasks and sleepless hours loomed, who could I count on?  There was a real bifurcation and the split was almost always along gender lines.

    Women in family contexts definitely do face pressures at home which constrain their willingness to pull unscheduled overtime.

    The real world makes subtle anticipatory and not so subtle after action compensation decisions.  Sometimes these will be biased, often they will be seen as biased, but in the large picture they are more fair than current gender politics portrays them to be.

    Imagine how both men and women would choose to behave should the law, in rhetoric and in reality, require equal pay for unequal contributions. 

    Equity and equality are seldom true equals.

  • Anonymous

    As a manager, when the famous substance hit the fan and daunting tasks and sleepless hours loomed, who could I count on?  There was a real bifurcation and the split was almost always along gender lines.

    Women in family contexts definitely do face pressures at home which constrain their willingness to pull unscheduled overtime.

    The real world makes subtle anticipatory and not so subtle after action compensation decisions.  Sometimes these will be biased, often they will be seen as biased, but in the large picture they are more fair than current gender politics portrays them to be.

    Imagine how both men and women would choose to behave should the law, in rhetoric and in reality, require equal pay for unequal contributions. 

    Equity and equality are seldom true equals.

  • Anonymous

    Could it also be that men may negotiate better than women?  Especially at the beginning when it may seem equal, but if men wait to negotiate or women don’t and accept the first offer then this could be part of the gap, that then widens as time goes on.

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