Comments for: Monday, Nov. 5, 2012: Taxes, BIA flights and UMaine hockey

Posted Nov. 04, 2012, at 11 a.m.

Maintain the American bargain After working hard for more than 40 years, I’m now collecting Social Security and depending on Medicare for my health insurance, two systems I paid into all my working life. I’m in good health now, but if I ever need nursing home care I would rely …

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  • Anonymous

    Is Lucy Quimby related to Roxanne Quimby?

    • Anonymous

      Not sure, but they’re both ultra environmentalists.  Lucy Quimby is Geoff Gratwick’s wife, though, and he supports Quimby’s national park up North.  Probably just another pawn for the liberals to get stuff nobody wants through the legislature.

  • Anonymous

    Wanda Willey Halpin, good letter. I too am on SS and Medicare with the supplement that I pay for. I don’t feel that I haven’t taken responsibility for my life. I have worked at one thing or another for 57 years. Paid my taxes, served my country, and only once for a couple of months collected partial unemployment.
     
    I, like you, can remember when the very wealthy paid a lot more in income taxes than they do today. They were proud to say that they had reached the 90% bracket. They sent their sons into the military to share in the defence of our nation.

    Today the 1% seem to be the biggest whiners and have the werewithall to buy Congress to insure that their taxes don’t go up. They no longer send their sons or daughters into harms way to defend their corporate interests, maybe that’s why we have drug out a war with a 3rd or 4th world power for 10 years and counting. They want it to continue indefinetly because they are making money hand over fist. After all, it’s not their children comming home with missing limbs, or worse.

    They have been given tax break after tax break with the unmet promise that they need this money to create jobs. Can anyone tell me when these mystery jobs are supposed to happen in this country?

  • Anonymous

    Ms. Halpin, I could not agree more.  It is an outrage that Romney pays a lower percentage of his gross income in taxes than I do.

  • Anonymous

    Wanda Willey Halpin–Good letter, I suppose you may have heard that Mr. Romney plans on giving everybody an additional 20% cut in taxes, in theory by cutting loop holes, to make it revenue neutral.  Don’t believe it, it will be another cut to the rich so they will be paying even less than they are now. Of course we could ask Romney/Ryan to explain it, but wait, they will not talk to anybody in the press.   That makes you feel real good I am sure. Why anybody would vote for someone who 1. Won’t show anymore than 2 years of taxes  2. Won’t explain why they have money in overseas banks.  3. Won’t explain their so called tax policy. 4. Won’t tell you if they would have signed the Lilly Leadbetter Law. 5. Has had so many positions on various things that nobody knows where he stands. 6. Out and out lies in many of his ads.

  • Anonymous

    W. Halpin, R. Duplisea, J. Theberge:  good letters.
    Addendum to the Maine Hockey letter.  Food prices have increased drastically, the quality isn’t always there, and the redo of the front food counter to a multiple line format degrades service.  Enough to make one consider bring one’s own food.

  • Anonymous

    Calling people names doesn’tmake your argument any more stronger. It weakens it, in fact.

    • Anonymous

      There’s a difference between calling someone a name and describing someone.

      • Anonymous

        Totally false.  You have no basis whatsoever for your name calling. 

        • Anonymous

          Please, pointing out that someone is doing something dumb is not name calling if that person has done something dumb.

          • Anonymous

            Perhaps if the writer wants to say that he or she believes a person has done something dumb, that what he or she should say. There’s a difference between doing something dumb, which most of us probably have at one time or another, and being an imbecile.

          • Anonymous

            If a person keeps doing the same dumb thing over and over does not make  them imbecilic, or maybe just insane.

          • Guest

            >>><<<

          • Anonymous

            Sooo, if he had just said imbeciles you’d be OK with the assesment? You are really complaining about the use of liberal not imbecile. Interesting

          • Anonymous

            You guys cry and say there is a war on Christmas if someone wishes you a happy holiday — quit acting like you have this thick skin and everyone else is just too sensitive. 

          • Anonymous

            I have never said anything about a war against Christmas, Christians, Jews, Muslims or any other darn thing and Yes many people ARE too sensitive about almost any darn thing.
            case in point … changing place names to cover a very sensitive minority.

  • Anonymous

    Wanda Willey Halpin;Why do you mention the wealthy successful people, who actually do contribute more than you do to SS and Medicare, and you don’t mention the 47% who get a free pass, contribute nothing, yet draw the same benefits as you?
    Unfortunately, one segment of society has not been upholding its part of the bargain:
    Your statement is true, but it’s not the people who had the ambition to be successful.

    • Anonymous

      What about the people who had the ambition to pick the right name on the crib, like the greedy little Walton brats? I find it very ironic that their father built his empire on selling American made products and taking care of his employees that helped build his business. His kids do neither. Most of the insane wealth in the top 1% is inherited money, not earned money. You can tell if it is inherited or earned by the way they treat others. 

      • Anonymous

        A study by NYU’s Edward Wolff & Manny Gitterren of DOL shows that 14.7% of the wealth of the top 1% is inherited.  Hardly most of the wealth.

        • Anonymous

          That’s not really illuminating though. What percentage of the wealthy came from wealth? They may not have inherited their money, but it’s much easier to be successful when you have things handed to you. 

          • Anonymous

            There will always be socioeconomic advantages but doesn’t mean the opportunity is not there for most.   According to the book the Millionaire Next Door 80% of millionaires are first generation.   Having a socioeconomic advantage does not necessily equate to having “things handed to you”.   Many “dynasty” fortunes are quickly dissapated by second and third generations while other family businesses are turned into huge successes by the second & third generations.  One of the most successful people I know is a childhood friend. When we were growing up he spent  many hours from the time he was ten working in his father’s business.  After college when he joined the business full time the business was worth no more than a couple hundred thousand giving him a lower middle class income.  I watched him work 24/7 into his thirties before any great success was realized.   He is now a multimillionaire employing over 400 people.   He many have had a hand up but I don’t think it comes close to having “things handed to him”.   By the way he made his father who started the business from scratch with no socioeconomic advantages a millionaire after his father retired. 

          • Anonymous

            I don’t care if you can pluck examples from obscurity and hand select the facts that bolster your argument — upward mobility is on the decline. We’re behind many other nations in that regard, even Canada. So you can obsess about my word choice, but the reality is that being a success isn’t all brains and hard work  It’s the opportunity your parents give you. If you come from wealth, you’re likely to be wealthy.  That’s fine, your children should be able to benefit from your position in life, but to lie and make these excuses that poor people are poor because they don’t have drive? To lie and say that the working class and the middle class are leeches on the country? That’s wrong and it’s worse to use those lies and argue for increased tax cuts for the wealthy. 

          • Anonymous

            Where did I argue for tax cuts for the wealthy? Where did I say the working class & the middle class are leeches?  I replied to a post that stated most of the wealthy inherited it. You didn’t debate that.  You asked what percentage of people received their wealth from wealth.   I gave you one souce which you don’t have to accept.   You also replied that is it easier to be sucessful when you have things handed to you.   I replied that there will always socioeconomic advantages but I don’t agree that is equivilent to having things handed to them. To me that means they didn’t work for it.    Many of those “socioeconomic advantages” come from middle class parents and being a success can mean being middle class.  The goal should not be to gather the most wealth.  I have never said poor are poor because they don’t have drive.  There are those who do not and will work to their abilities but they are far from the majority.   

          • Anonymous

            Believe it or not, the world isn’t revolving around you. This is a comment thread — the original comment speaks about half the country being leeches. 

            I did debate your point. I said it’s not illuminating and it’s plucked from the bulk of facts and presents a skewed version of the truth. 

          • Anonymous

            So most of the money of the top 1% is inherited wealth?

          • Anonymous

            I would say there is extreme privilege inherited through growing up wealthy. That’s undeniably true — upward mobility is happening less and less, and to the extent that it is, it’s the wealthy getting even wealthier, a steeper pyramid. That reality goes against the original nonsense comment from Ranger266. 

            I never argued against your statistic, so you don’t have to play a little gotcha game about it. I just said it’s not illuminating and it skews reality. You don’t have to specifically inherit money to have been given money or have been given privilege. That all goes against the claim that the top 1% is so much smarter and harder working than the 99%.

      • Anonymous

        You are clearly clueless as only 23% of millionaires inherit their wealth. 

        • Anonymous

          OK, try the figure for Capital Gains and dividends.  They used to call it “coupon clipping”.

        • Anonymous

          AND many of THEM are lifelong liberals who give nothing to charity personally but love to share what you earned with our most needy. Go think.

        • Anonymous

          Millionaires are not insane wealth. Billionaires are. Go back and Google how many of them were born into it. Like the Koch brothers or the Walton brats. There is nothing wrong with wealth. Insane wealth and greed are wrong, period. 

    • pbmann

      You are wrong. 

      The 47 pay into SS and Medicare at an overal higher rate than the rich, FICA does not get taken out of income over $106,000 so the rich pay smaller percentage than the working poor.  The 47%, the people not carrying their weight, include retirees who worked their entire lives, military members fighting to protect people like you, people with familes making less than $50,000 (and they pay the max amount of FICA and Medicare taxes), the working poor (you know people who work at places like Walmart)

      Stop drinking the Romney Kool-aid.

      • Anonymous

        Why do people like you always drag in the elderly who worked all their lives? That’s who it’s for, and nobody has a problem with that.
        The class envy on this website is pathetic.

    • Anonymous

      Another political myth.  If you are employed–aboveboard–FICA is withheld and many of the 47% get a refund.  Those in the higher income bracket–true income– should pay more than they do in FICA, namely raise the FICA ceiling limit.

      • Anonymous

         Just as a point of information many millions get back in a “tax refund” more than they contribute in income taxes medicare Fica combined. 

    • Anonymous

       Wanda also fails to get that Social Security and medicare is not paid for by Income taxes.

  • Anonymous

    Ms. Halpin – On your next Social Security check, actual check or direct deposit, look to see how this check is described. In my case, I paid into SS for 53 years. Now, this check is called a government “benefit.” 

    • Anonymous

      I like to think of mine as a return on investment.

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