Comments for: On being newly poor: The humiliation, relief of public assistance

Posted Oct. 29, 2012, at 1:58 p.m.
Last modified Oct. 29, 2012, at 4:41 p.m.

In addition to facing dozens of prostitution charges, has anyone noticed that the Zumba instructor from Wells also has been charged with deception in connection with allegedly collecting public assistance from Temporary Assistance for Needy Families at the princely sum of a couple hundred dollars a month? I sure could …

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  • Anonymous

    What a pile…If you try and fail there is still the “safety net” to fall back on…If you try and succeed you join the rest of us productive members of society…The problem is that it’s too comfortable and not humiltating enough…If it wasn’t you wouldn’t be “paralized with fear” and feel the need for the NANNY state to hold your hand till you feel comfortable..There are times we ALL go thru that are tough but we don’t give up trying…I do agree that there is a lack of good paying jobs thanks to the liberal and environut strangel hold on the state for the past 34 years with their anti- everything quality of place crap but that is changing…Go ahead and jump…The water is fine…

    • Anonymous

      AMEN!

    • Guest

      Today’s poor is different than the poor of the 50’s and 60’s.
      You’ve never struggled in this economy trying to live on minimum wage. If you ever have you would know what this young lady is talking about. Sometimes you have to live it and live it now, it’s not what is was.

      • Anonymous

        How about the “poor” of the 70’s? What is the diff? Having no money is having no money. And don’t be so quick to say who hasn’t been “poor”. Some of the “poor” didn’t have it so easy to get all these wonderful gimmees. And yes, some of the “poor” DID make do with what they got and DID work for below minimum wages and DID take substantial pay cuts and DID lose jobs at a time that put them in tough shape and DIDN’T get unemployment for 99 weeks.. But you know what? Thesse “poor” worked 2 and 3 jobs to make ends meet. They DID not rely on food stamps and welfare. They had just as much of a burden as anyone today. Difference is they didn’t whine about it, they got off their rear ends and took any work available and worked their way back. So much for the poor “poor”.

        • maineiac123

           “Thesse “poor” worked 2 and 3 jobs to make ends meet.”  Really?  And the poor today should simply work those 2-3 jobs now I suppose.  Even if those jobs are non-existant?  I’m willing to bet that both homemaine and midcoastconservative consider themselves good charitable christians and probably republicans but like so many others I’m still waiting to find a “compassionate conservative” that Bush liked to talk about.  And no, I’m not on welfare or foodstamps.

          • Anonymous

            There are PLENTY of jobs if one wants to work..Walmart is hiring…So is a bunch of others..Yea it’s part time but nobody says it has to be a career choice…Just a survival job or JOBS as in my case..Stepping stones to a better future…One step at a time…Folks nowa days want it handed to them…It doesn’t work that way…YOU EARN IT…

          • Guest

            Unsustainable minimum wage jobs.

          • maineiac123

             There are plenty of jobs?  Really?  Jobs that have enough hours, jobs that pay a wage sufficient to get off welfare? You must be living in a different country or state.   

          • Anonymous

            Like I said…Libs want it handed to them..

          • Anonymous

            Is it asking too much of Walmart, the country’s largest employer, to pay a wage to it’s full-time workers that allows them to exist without government subsidies? That’s asking for a living wage to get off the handouts.

          • Anonymous

            Actually I AM A DEMOCRAT who grew up POOR…was laid off for almost THREE years, long before 99 weeks of unemployment benefits. Never collected ANY aid such as welfare, food stamps etc. and ended up working 2 and sometimes 3 jobs until I finally was able to get back into the company I was laid off from. Even then AFTER 3 years, I came back as a TEMPORARY EMPLOYEE for over a year before I actually got back as a full time employee. And I wasn’t the ONLY one that happened to. And YES why wouldn’t the “poor” work those 2 and 3 jobs, what is so special about people of today? Is it beneath them to work 2 jobs? And YES, being in the position I was in has made me become charitable. I have given to charity more in ONE YEAR than Joe Biden donated in 10. How about this little tidbit…not every DEMOCRAT is a liberal and not ever CONSERVATIVE is a Republican. Oh, by the way…this all happened UNDER A DEM PRES. Maybe you haven’t noticed…Bush isn’t the pres NOW.

          • maineiac123

             uh huh.

        • Guest

          Yes they did and their quality of life sucked.

      • Anonymous

        Really ??I went from making 70 grand a year in construction to working SEVERAL part time jobs…Managed to make the car payments and house payments..Yea we don’t go out much and cut a bunch of other “wants”…It can be done if one has the WILL TO DO IT…Back in the 80’s I worked at Penobscot Poultry driving forklift..My wife at Waldo Shoe..We went thru that downturn when they both closed with a new baby without handouts…Don’t preach to me about not knowing what it’s like to be poor…I also grew up in a very poor family and there wasn’t government handouts back then..Not that my parents would have taken them…Take your liberal crap elsewhere..It ain’t flying here..

        • Guest

          If you know poverty you’d be more empathetic and remember where you came from. I do.

          • Anonymous

            Actually it makes those of us that have lived it without the handout mad as he** at those that live off our tax dollars.  We do remember how many sacrifices we made and how we busted our butts to make it through trying times.  We find it hard to be empathetic to those that are living on the government dime.

          • Guest

            This young lady is doing nothing to be ashamed of and everything to be proud of.
            You can waste emotion and time being angry, but it still nothing but wasted time.
            With all the rules and regulations these days, parents run more of a risk of losing their children because of living conditions.

            I remember tar paper shacks, no running water and a 5 gallon pail for the flush. Do you suppose the state allows that anymore and what they do when they find out kids are living in that state of poverty?

            Being empathetic is being human. That’s sad you and so many can’t muster it up.

          • Anonymous

            According to this piece and her bio on her business’ website, she has and continues to make choices that have created and are perpetuating her situation.  That certainly isn’t anything to be proud of!!

          • Guest

            Heather Denkmire is a writer and artist who lives in Portland with her two young daughters. After a few challenging years, she is growing her small business, where her team helps nonprofit organizations win grants. 
            =======================================

            She has a business. I’d be proud of my own business as well.

          • Anonymous

            I would be more proud to be supporting my family without welfare.  Oh, that’s right, I am.  And at the same time, I am helping to support her family because of her poor choices.

          • Small businesses are touted by many, including our governor, as being the lifeblood of Maine. Invariably, some will fail, even those with well thought out business plans. Many entrepreneurs find success only after several attempts, and many years of being in the red. Given time, her business might flourish. 

          • Guest

            …….

          • Anonymous

            You describe a huge difference of people who are entitled and do so from being born into the life of entitlement, and those who are honestly in hard times.  Sure it is just nasty to see all the teens deliberately get pregnant Just to get on the Entitlement plan.  Then they learn to trade their food coupons for cash for smokes and beer.  NOW that is NASTY to Every person who pays taxes. Then you have the person who had a good job, lost it due to downsizing or business closings, and now earns a lousy min. wage.  That IS the Clue.  Try having some compassion,.it far outweighs the negative.

      • Anonymous

        Absolute bunk. Try this on for poverty. I slit my leg open pretty deep on glass in the early sixties as a 10 year old. I went to EMGH emergency room for care. They sewed me up and to save money they did it without anesthetic. These “poor” have healthcare, drug programs, food stamps, TANF, housing, cell phones, WIC, and at least 60 other federal & state low income programs. We had none of that. Please don’t whine about what you don’t have. Be grateful for what you do have and work, plan cajole yourself to a better life. Heathers figures if we gave her a little bit more she could escape poverty…. What she lacks is initiative, no amount of additional money is going to make up for that..

        • Guest

          Is this a competition about who was more poor than the other?
          Sounds like a Pee Wee Herman contest with a bunch of five year olds shouting “Watch me! Look at me! My boo boo is worse than his boo boo”.

          We all have stories.

          • Anonymous

            This was your comment which I responded to.

            “You’ve never been poor. It’s obvious. Don’t try and claim it either.
            Today’s poor is different than the poor of the 50’s and 60’s.”    ~~~~~wbt30

            If you don’t want folks to draw comparisons. Don’t make them.

          • Guest

            You remind me of the kids that love to create discourse and then sit back and watch what they just did.

          • Anonymous

            So are you saying you didn’t invite comparisons?

            I guess the fact is you cannot back up your initial comment.

          • Guest

            —–

      • Anonymous

        Well said.  Thank you.  The people who do not feel the pain in their wallets in this economy, should try living on minimum wage for a few months and experience the reality of the Newly Poor.  Bet that would make them see reality. 

    • trisailer

       What a pile is exactly correct. The pile is your belief that liberals and environmental regulation is responsible for the lack of jobs.
      The fact of the matter is that Maine has experienced a huge amount of economic growth because of intelligent public policy. Look at the states GDP in 1969 and compare it to today. Maine is more recession proof because of the investment in protecting the environment.
      Maine’s paper industry was not lost to cheap labor or environmental regulation, it was lost to the lack of investment, poor management and the massive skim of wall st. The market share went to the European’s who had paying attention to productivity and technology all along. Even China, who bought some of Maine’s old machines got twice the productivity and quality out of them because they put the best technology on them.
      Don’t take my word for it, break out a calculator and look at the cost of heating three million gallons of river water per day to 115 degrees and dumping back into the river along with thousands of tons of fiber each and every day. The DEP did them a favor.

      We had a system that was working. The fact is that the very idea of reducing poverty came out of the success of that well functioning system. If we would have stayed true to the ideals of shared costs and opportunities we would be having a different conversation.

      Heather is in the situation she’s in because of the skim that is taken from the efforts of working people. If there was any proof that tax cuts and reduced regulation produced economic activity we would be seeing it. The Bush tax cuts have had 10 years and all we have to show is $25 trillion parked off shore.

      Heather, and people like her are not the cause of our economic problems, they are the result.

      • Anonymous

        Heather is in the situation she’s in because she has made some poor life choices.

        She is single with 2 children.  She is a writer and “artist”.  

        • Anonymous

          I don’t know her situation, so I will not comment too much.  But I’d rather see them list her as an “aspiring writer and artist” currently working as a ____ and ____.

  • Anonymous

    Hang in there Heather. Sooner or later, the rest of America will realize that the wages are stuck in the early 90’s and this needs to change. Right now, it is just talk and rhetoric on the matter. But, soon it will be recognized as the problem that is ruining our middle class and holding back our economy. Then things will change. As soon as you do not have to go backwards when you take a job to get off welfare, people will go back to work. 

    • Anonymous

      Heather has the gift of writing.  She describes the NEWLY poor.  I would hope there is a job for her at the Governor’s office.  She would be an asset to him and his staff and since she lives the Poor Life herself and DOES recognize the governors goals to getting people off of entitlements, she would be qualified to help with his effort.  Makes good sense.  Hope you read this Heather and hope you contact the governor’s office.

      • Anonymous

        Very true. He gave a job to Lauren. Maybe he can pull a few strings and get Heather hired too. Might be educational for the governor to actually have a conversation with someone who is on food stamps. I wouldn’t hold my breath though. LePage is famous for not listening to ANYONE , other than the voices in his own head. 

        • Anonymous

          Sorry to inform you, but the Gov. DOES listen to people.  He will never be your favorite as is always demonstrated in your comments.  Freedom of Speech is so enlightening.

          • Anonymous

            The funny thing is that I do not dislike Paul LePage because of his party affiliation, like so many on here do. Although I do believe the Tea Party is dragging the Republican party into a hole that it can’t dig out of. I have a problem with our governor, because I truly believe the man is basically dim witted and should not be making decisions for 1.2 million people. We can and should be a lot more particular about who we let occupy that office. I think a simple I.Q. test would cause embarrassment for most of the people who voted for him. Fortunately for governor LePage, and many more like him on both sides of the aisle, this is not one of the requirements for holding public office. 

          • Anonymous

            Have you asked the head of Mardens, what views are of Gov. LePage/ Why was he allowed to run the store? Doubt they hire “Dim Wits”/
            You give the Tea Party too much credit. They are seldom in the news . The next time I see an elected official I will tell them your thoughts. Thanks so much.

          • Anonymous

            C’mon, that’s just a mean thing to write. What if someone wrote that you’re dim-witted because you were a wiper on a tugboat? Or that you sell wood for a living? No matter what you think, he’s in the Blaine House and you’re writing nasty comments in an on-line forum that nobody reads.

          • Anonymous

            I was never a wiper on a tug boat. I went from being an AB to being an oiler. I then worked my way up to chief on anchor handling and towing vessels. A “hawse piper” through and through. I chose the firewood business as a means of exercise, fresh air, and sunshine for my semi retirement. Not because I am not capable of bigger and greater vocations. I stand by my opinion that we could have done a lot better at picking someone who, like it or not, speaks for 1.2 million Mainers. The man is already famous for making ignorant statements and he can barely grunt his way through a speech. We could have done a lot better.

          • Anonymous

            Look, everybody get its that you loathe Paul LePage but does calling him dim-witted add anything substantive to this discussion?  I can’t imagine that you are any more intelligent or articulate than the governor and yet, he’s Maine’s chief executive and you’re a lower-deck lawyer with a Walmart obsession.   

            Hawse-piper explains a lot – you boys always have a chip on your shoulder.

             

          • Anonymous

            Lower deck lawyer with a Walmart obsession? lol. That is the best compliment anyone has ever paid me on here. Thank you. I do not like WalMart, you are right. They sell cheap Chinese crap, they are America’s largest under employer, and they cost the tax payers with their “public assistance” wages. The greedy Walton brats are now worth in excess of $93 billion, or 93,000 million. I think that is enough, even though they probably do not. I also think they could afford to give those people a raise, so I don’t have to buy their groceries and heating oil. Hawse piper explains a lot? You bet it does. I came up through the hard way and have the knowledge and skills to prove it. I took the chief’s position on an old ice breaker 3 years ago that had been hugging the dock for 2 years. It was built during WWII and was a diesel electric. Two maritime grads tried to get it up and running and failed. My brother, the captain, suggested they call me. I had it ready to make way in about a day. There ended up being 27 steps to get the old girl to spin the wheel. Leave out one step, and you will not move. When the coasties had the boat, it had a 20 man engineering department. We ran it with three. Me, and two other dumb old hawse pipers. Chip on my shoulder? I doubt it. Confidence in my abilities? Absolutely. 

          • Anonymous

            Two maritime grads couldn’t get the plant up but you flew in and saved the day. Must have been a pair of Queen’s Pointers. A pair of Castine grads would have re-engined that old tub, installed a CPP, automated the controls, and steered it with an IPad.

          • Anonymous

            Being a MMA graduate, I have mad respect for hawes pipers!  I always look it at is they got paid to learn what I paid to learn.

          • Anonymous

            Thanks jdub ! I have worked with several MMA guys in the past. I always found that they knew what they were doing, had a great work ethic, and they always had your back in a bar fight!lol.

          • Anonymous

            Maybe we should also give a test to those that vote.

          • Anonymous

            Agreed. 

          • Anonymous

            Apparently there is no clue for you.

          • trisailer

             He may listen, but what is he actually doing? Where are the jobs? He still calls them “job creators”, gave them a huge tax cut as his first act…so, where are the jobs? How many more meetings does he need to have with business before he HEARS what they are saying…they need customers with money to buy.
            The governor is focusing his efforts on getting people to work for less. He’s going after the pensions of people who did all the right things for decades. He’s focusing his efforts on disenfranchising voters so more of his kind, with their misguided policies, can do even more damage and accelerate the race to the bottom.

          • Anonymous

            At the start of the Governor’s term, he stated that changes would not be easy and  he was so correct.  He can please some of the people most of the time but cannot please others at anytime. Everywhere USA, our life styles of the 90’s are changing.  Many are feeling the pain in their wallets, no raises match the cost of the continuous rise in price of goods.  Fuel prices are played with by greedy companies involved with OPEC and We the People feel the pain each time we buy fuel.
            The least we could do is try to listen to new ideas and be kinder to each other.

  • Anonymous

    Choosing Responsible Men 101…

    • Anonymous

      Exactly

  • Anonymous

    One Portland elite feeling what half of northern Maine is feeling brings tears to my eyes. . Do what good looking Britts do and you will find Plenty of rich men in Portland who would marry you for your good looks.  Problem solved.  Sarah Lawerence is a finishing school for girls to find rich husbands modeled after british finishing schools

    • Anonymous

      This woman has two children to care for, and she is working.  I doubt she has time to go to finishing school or look for a rich husband.  From the story she wrote, I figure she is looking to be independent financially.  Finding a rich man to marry would not solve that problem.
      Heather-use your strong will to get through the present, and move on in the future.

    • Anonymous

      Advocating gold-digging for poor single mothers is misogynistic and a lamely unfunny boot strap theory. Horatio Alger you ain’t. You know squat about poverty.

      • Anonymous

        I know lots about poverty, more then you I’m sure.. I needed help as a young man starting out, and have helped many since then.
        Nothing wrong with gold digging, A nice older man wants/needs a companion and she needs a rich older man to help her achive the goals in life she desires.. What is wrong with the truth.. I wish her the best of luck in the future.. She can and should do it.. Love is not a top priority in life, liking the person you are with is.

        • Guest

          Women don’t need to be encouraged to depend on a man.

          • Anonymous

            Been that way and worked throughout history.. I am just telling the truth. They don’t need to depend on a man but a sugar daddy sure would make life easier for some.. Heather seems to be very good looking and this could work for her.. Use your assets to your advantage..

            Question. If you are dating 2 men, equally nice, but one lives with his parents because his job at McD’s doesn’t afford him the cost of a apt. and the other one makes 100k a year with his own house and lakeside camp and a nice car, which one will you pick to marry, if given the choice. LOL!!! 

          • Are you fishing for a gold digger by any chance? :D

            Would you also encourage poor men to try and woo an old, rich widow?

            Though I’ve no problem with such arrangements if both parties are willing, swallowing ones dignity for sake of comfort is not something that many people are willing to do.

          • Anonymous

            Life has many truths, like faces, if they are honest then none are wrong.

          • Guest

            You don’t carry in your countenance a letter of recommendation.  ~Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge

    • Anonymous

      Problem solved?  How, exactly, is that?

  • Dave Chameides

    One of the stronger pieces on poverty I’ve heard.  Everyone should read this!

  • Anonymous

    I would say taking up a career supporting non profits and writing on the side is a tough way to get the bill paid. There are plenty of career choices out there that do a much better job at achieving ones financial goals. It’s time to stop blaming conservatives for the lack of income when certain career choices just don’t make economic sense. Yes, I too started with nothing, worked bottom feeder jobs for years, but wised up to the fact that tough choices sometimes need to be made.

    • trisailer

       Your talking about two completely separate ideas. Yes, people should take responsibility for their individual success, but the achievement of that success is largely determined by economic policy.

      The government has a responsibility and a incentive to facilitate as much success for it’s citizens as possible. A thriving economy attracts people to the goal of success. We had a thriving economy after WW2 and people were attracted to achieving success for themselves and their families. People who wanted to just make a lot of money could, but their were restraints on greed. Those restraints were established to give working people a fighting chance. They were put there to give our country a chance to become the economic powerhouse it became.

      We can convince people to be attracted to their lives and pursue success, but there better be a job there to reward their efforts. The jobs would be there if greed still had reasonable restraints. We can’t allow Wall St to continue to take the massive skim they have been taking and expect that we have reasonable opportunities to reward people who make the right choices.

  • Anonymous

    She has a degree from Skidmore.   That’s an excellent school.  I would be surprised if she couldn’t find a pretty decent job if she chose to find one.  She has a choice– other people don’t.

    I think I smell some BS here but I could be wrong.

    • Anonymous

      She’s a writer and artist, it says.  I assume she has some third job that pays?

      • Anonymous

        And a business owner…

  • Anonymous

    Choices in life are what lead us to our destiny.  Being an artist is like being a rock star, there is little hope for success.  Compounded with being a single mom adds to the hardship.
    Then you attack those of us who would otherwise support you by suggesting our stance against the tremendous amount of fraud in system is somehow misplaced. 
    You made bad choices in life, for the most part conservatives are forgiving and look at public assistance as being well used in your case.  Needless attacks on our stance against abuse in the system is unfounded and wrong.

    • trisailer

       Nobody was talking about fraud, but since you brought it up fraud prosecutions are double under Obama than they were under Bush. They are ten times what they were under Bush I, Fraud has been analyzed to death and always comes in around 5% of costs.

      The other 95% is because our economic system has become fatally skewed, rewarding the behavior of Wall St at the expense of people who actually do real work. I made all the right choices and went all the way to the top of my corporation where I saw with my own eyes people making millions from shuffling paper and double dealing. Welfare fraud is peanuts compared to what goes on on Wall St.

      This is all the result of “starve the beast.”   Taking the attention off Wall St who is skimming trillions and complaining about the results is the very reason it continues.

      • Anonymous

        Fraud was brought up.  In Maine fraud is far worse than average, only LePage has fought hard against it.  It’s not peanuts, it is billions of dollars and you can’t prove otherwise.
        Corporate welfare is also bad, but it is a different subject, what they are doing is legal and it shouldn’t be.  Especially GE, foodstamp presidents bff.

        • trisailer

           You make the statement, back it up with the numbers. I’ve seen a number of studies over the years and most of the fraud is by providers and doctors, not recipients. There was a recent discussion on this topic and I believe the governor decided that the cost of recovering the small amount in Maine was not worth it.

          My point is/was that the increased cost is the result of the recession.

  • Anonymous

    Actually, Heather, there are (or were in some instances) programs that encourage people to work without losing all their help at once.  1.  MaineCare, for the moment, allows working parents to maintain coverage until their income hits 200% of the poverty level.  That’s $2,522 per month for a household of two.  Our Governor and the 125th Legislature reduced that to 133% which should be taking effect in the next month or two so once this household of two earns $1,677 per month the parent will lose their MaineCare.   2.  Child Care – parents with income below 250% of poverty can get help paying for child care costs.  However, once again, our Govenor and the 125th Legislature took funding from the program so now the mom will have to work about 6 months before getting help.  Good luck with that.  3.  Food Stamps will continue until income reaches about 185% of the poverty level.  They’ll go down by about $1.00 for each $3.00 you earn until you’re over income.   So the Gov created a cliff that had been carefully put in place, thereby removing the little security these families had in their attempts to move out of poverty.  Hopefully, we can turn the Legislature back over to Democrats who are willing and able to think beyond giving tax cuts to the wealthy, and put in place programs that help all families. 

    • Anonymous

      Amen.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you Heather.  This is something I’ve been saying for years.  The jump IS very scary and I think a tiered program would work well, however, no one on a government level is listening!  I think they should have steps…when you start working let’s say you receive your benefits for a month longer just to help get on your feet and store some food and money aside.  Then, the following month say, cut your benefits by 1/4 and so on.  That way you are building that cushion you need “just in case” and you aren’t feeling like you are being abandoned.  Mainecare lasts longer and they have the cub care program too so health insurance isn’t as big an issue.

    • Anonymous

       We are currently spending on poverty programs about $60k per household below the poverty line. Where do you think the cut-off should be?

      • Anonymous

        Maybe I didn’t make myself clear.  At the present time as soon as you get a paycheck your benefits end.  What I am suggesting is cutting benefits by 1/4 per month.  In four months they will know their job is fairly secure and be done receiving benefits.   In the meantime they are actually giving the state back money in taxes.  So the burden is even less.  So, to answer your question…the cut of would be in four months.

        • Anonymous

           Ok I get it…  Interesting idea.
          Certainly worth looking at. What we are doing now isn’t working for either the recipients or the taxpayer.

          • Anonymous

            The biggest issue with TANF receipients is how scary it is to lose those safe benefits.  If we gave them incentive to build up a reserve it would be less scary for them

          • Stepping down ones dependence on well, just about anything, is usually a more effective long term solution than going cold turkey, which while can be done, is a harder path to follow. Sounds decent to me.

          • Anonymous

            Thank you!  Why can’t we get the government to see this?  I can’t see where this would be harder to implement that what is in place now and it might even encourage TANF receipients to report their income instead of hiding because they are scared to let go.  Bonus, they would be paying taxes.

  • FELT

    Struggling out of poverty and living in a 28′ house trailer with both parents working days and nights was my reality as a child…I didn’t even get new clothes until I went to college. My folks made it, as did I and I  was one of the first people hired to run anti-poverty programs in Washington after law school where I worked p.t. jobs. 
    Two tips…stop having children….this woman has two kids and is poor????; and there are few perm. jobs for writers and artists; so pick up real marketable skills that have certificates and licenses or join a trade union or craft guild. 

    This is the real joy of Gov. LePage…He knows how and when to say ‘NO’ to life style choices which only increase dependency on social service programs. The greatest fear of people who ran anti-poverty programs is that the welfare moms would get so comfortable they would just keep having more children to be ‘parented’ by government programs.  Perpetuating poverty seems to be the demand from the Left, and to pay for it they take from the wealthy….not sustainable, as we’re finding out the hard way.

    • Anonymous

      I understand where you are coming from regarding marketable skills, however, I think you are out of line with the “stop having children” crack.  When are people going to realize that not everyone is having babies simply because they are too lazy to use protection.  There are many, many reasons a woman (or man) finds themselves needing state aid after having children.  She could have lost a good paying job working for an advertising agency only because she was low person on the totem pole when the downsized.  She could have had a husband who provided for her while he was alive and then died young without providing life insurance or was under insured. Need I go on?  I’m sure you get the picture.

      • Anonymous

        Liberals have that golden option that the surpreme court upheld an they are so proud of called abortion

        • Anonymous

          What are you talking about?  Who is talking about abortion?  I’m talking about situations where the children are here already.  Ugh!  If you have children I hope you never see yourself on the wrong side of a pink slip trying to figure out how you are going to take care of them on minimum wage.

          • Anonymous

            There are plenty of services out there to help her.. I made a statement that before deciding to have children and becoming dependant on the State use your options you are so proud of.

      • Anonymous

        Actually if you read her bio on the website for her business, she chose to leave a job in 2005 to focus more on her business.  Sounds to me that her situation is her own making.

        • Guest

          Sounds like she had a plan.

        • Anonymous

          In 2005 it proably sound like a good idea.  Unfortunately, then the recession came.  I don’t think any of us can say that every decision we ever made was a good one. 

    • I guess it’s good for you your parents didn’t follow your tip?

      • FELT

        snark, snark….My parents were working poor and my Dad advanced by taking advantage of technical training schools. His guitar playing became a pastime, as did bike repair.

        Single women with multiple children can and do pull themselves out of poverty, I doubt whether incessant blogging and ‘art’ are the way to do it:

        “Last night I blogged about my medical freedom being stolen by the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. I love writing stuff like that. Then, last night and today I was working at the computer all day. When I paused my billing clock and looked at Facebook or twitter—and I did that a lot—I felt anxiety-ridden and frenetic. Click! Click! Click!”

        So she’s a politically biased blogger who does it at work…..would I hire this person???

        And almost getting hit by a truck…”To the barista at Starbucks. Blurting is the right word. Moments after it happened, I used my phone to email several people and said “I just wanted to tell people who I knew would care.”

        How many poor people have a barista at Starbucks; or a big phone bill and twitter and….. “wrote about being a recovered alcoholic”  and this is a single mother?

        or what about this tidbit:

        “Hot summer, sitting with a dear friend at a street-side table of a hoppin’ restaurant in Uptown Minneapolis. It’s 1997 and I’ve just found out it’s possible to be cool and do cool things while not drinking alcohol. My cool friend and I are talking about our cool dreams and cool ideal futures, especially about our super-cool dream jobs. I’ve begun calling myself “a writer” and have been posting “web essays” (aka, these days, blog posts) every week.”

        The traveling poor….’calling herself a writer’ because she’s a compulsive blogger???

        Hate to pick her life apart, but that’s what happens when you want me to pay for it. 

        • She sounds pretty flaky. Though flaky, politically motivated bloggers can (obviously) make a living doing other things.

          Though I believe in practical, marketable skills, even people with advanced degrees and technical skills can be laid off and struggle to pay their bills, especially given the amount of debt most graduates carry these days.

          The best laid plans can fall apart. Achieving financial stability before having kids is ideal. Though ideal and the real world just don’t always come together – some people would go through life without ever having children if they waited for it. Is it fair to say – if you’re poor, don’t have children?

          Career welfare recipients are irksome, though I’m happy to help someone get past a temporary bump in the road.

  • In addition to facing dozens of prostitution charges, has anyone noticed that the Zumba instructor from Wells also has been charged with deception in connection with allegedly collecting public assistance from Temporary Assistance for Needy Families at the princely sum of a couple hundred dollars a month?

    Yes…though I’m unclear as to what your point in this regard is – it’s quite clear Ms Wright far exceeded the income cutoff (legal or not) to obtain assistance and was in fact, a prime example of someone who is defrauding the system. The amount isn’t what matters. It still would have been fraudulent if she was only receiving $10 a month. A poor way to start an otherwise good article.

    Though I think LePage’s approach to the (not so) “rampant” welfare fraud is akin to using a wrecking ball when a hammer would suffice – getting those who are ripping off the system off and diverting these funds back to people who really need them to get back to financial independence (such as yourself), is a sound ideal. 

    As usual, I think a moderate approach, somewhere between Baldacci and LePage is needed.

  • Anonymous

    That’s why they couldn’t get her going. No USB port stopped them in their tracks. I have two step brothers who are MMA grads. Nothing special, intellectually, trust me. They know less about computerization than I do, and I am no techie. In their defense, they are in their fifties and were never exposed to computers at MMA. I knew what to do because I cut my teeth on old tubs like that one. I can put my hand on the valve cover of a 645 EMD and tell you which valves need adjusting. You can’t learn that from a book. I can put my hand on the shaft while it is turning and tell you if there is a bent fluke on the wheel. You can’t learn that from a book either. Touch, feel, and the hair standing up on the back of your neck when something is wrong can only be learned with sea time and experience. I know maritime grads that can hold their own on any vessel and I was proud to work with them. I also know maritime grads that I would not allow near my engine room without close supervision. The door swings both ways. The difference is, I have never known a hawse piper with a license who wasn’t a cracker jack man to have around when the feces collided with the atmospheric relocation device. Again, sea time and experience. I have always found them to be far more handy than a BS degree and a pee coat. 

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