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Comments for: Woman’s body found after tall ship HMS Bounty sinks off NC coast

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  • Anonymous

    How terribly tragic – i pray for the safety of the crew – i can only hope that that incredible ship will weather the storm and be re-claimed.

    • Anonymous

       Weather the storm??
      Reclaim it ??
       Dont believe it will happen.
       The frigging thing SANK in a hurricane.
        Sadly ,2 people died.

  • Anonymous

    During the recent heavy weather, I’ve had the opportunity to watch all of you at work on deck and aloft. You don’t know wood from canvas! And it seems you don’t want to learn! Well, I’ll have to give you a lesson. Capt. William Bligh

    • Anonymous

      I didn’t steal your f#$%ng coconuts. Perhaps this ship needs a new captain.
      Your former friend, Fletcher C.

      • Anonymous

        Fools rush in where angels fear to tread, MATTHEW 7:3-5

      • Guest

        To the voyage of the Bounty. Still waters of the great golden sea. Flying fish like streaks of silver, and mermaids that sing in the night. The Southern Cross and all the stars on the other side of the world.

        –Midshipman Roger Byam

  • Anonymous

    Why were they out in this???????????????  This puts the lives of rescue personnel at risk and will be a huge cost.  I don’t understand why they were out to sea with this forecast.

    • Anonymous

      I was thinking the same thing. They’d have been much better off securely anchored in a well sheltered harbor, accepting the likelihood of some damage to the rig, with the very worst thing that could have happened would be the ship possibly going aground if it broke free, with no chance of loss of life. Instead, they decide to roll the dice and put out to sea heading south in an attempt to get far enough south of the hurricane to escape completely un$cathed.  But that’s a risk that comes with a chance of loss of life to the crew, as well as risk to Coast Guard rescue personnel.  Not a decision I would have made.  There was plenty of warning for this storm, giving them ample time to secure the ship in a safe spot and get the crew safely ashore. 

      Most recent update has the CG rescuing the crew from their life rafts, but with one or two of the crew not accounted for and possibly lost at sea.  Sad and completely unnecessary.

    • Anonymous

      The ship was on its way to Texas for the winter.  Ships are often safer at sea then in the harbor during a  storm.  I can’t speak as to why this particular ship was at sea, it seems they could have avoided the storm, or, given what the ship is, would have been better off for the crew to be in port…

      Let’s hope they find the two missing crewmembers.

      • Anonymous

        Often time that is true, but this ship would not be safer at sea.  It is not a modern design of modern materials.  Huge tactical mistake.  Going into port somewhere would have saved lives, maybe not the ship, but the crew. They were in Maine on the hard last week.  This hurricane has given plenty of notice.  Heartbreaking for the families of the missing crew.  :(

        • It was a big boat though it’s not like a taking your 27 foot sailboat out during a hurricane 

          • Anonymous

            Just being big has very little to do with seaworthiness, and that’s what counts when the weather turns nasty.  It’s bad luck that they didn’t get quite far enough south before the hurricane approached them, but it was very bad judgment to unnecessarily put themselves in the position where a little bad luck could do them in. It’s not like they were far out at sea and had no choice but to deal with this storm at sea because when they first got the news of this storms approach several days ago they had plenty of time to have found a harbor to hole up in until the storm passed.

          • Anonymous

            Even the largest vessels are but a speck in the vast sea!

          • except for the Queen Mary 2! 

      • Anonymous

        The vessel was on its way to St Petersburg FL not Texas.

    • Anonymous

      Even Gilligan would have known better…

    • I can understand where you’re getting at it’s pretty stupid being out in weather like this, but rescue teams are used to dealing with this kind of stuff. We wouldn’t have them if we didn’t need to use them 

      • Anonymous

        I have a can of FIX O FLAT too, but that does mean I want to find a nail in the road to use it. But I do like you’re line of thinking. 

    • Anonymous

      From what I understand Robin Wallbridge is the vessels Captain. The thought he had according to what I have read was to go out around Hurricane Sandy. I am not sure of his reasoning… whether it was the owners demands to get that vessel into southern waters and laid up for the winter, or sometimes its part of the vessels  insurance policy that’s required by a certain date and time to be in a certain area  for insurance coverage to remain in effect. I have heard many reasons for the push of vessel south through extreme weather from ignorance to arrogance.  My impression of this Captain is  is neither, and very much a professional. Everybody was in survival suits, life vests, and he was securing everybody in the rafts before himself and the one crew got washed away. My thoughts and prayers are with him and his wife

    • Anonymous

      I don’t know the particulars of this vessel, (length, tonnage, etc.) but during the approach of a hurricane the Captain of the Port generally posts a mandatory evacuation of the port.

      • Anonymous

        No Captain of the Port or harbormaster (or anyone else) can make you put to sea into an oncoming hurricane, and when they left port nobody knew exactly which harbors would be most affected anyway.  There are all kinds of sheltered places along the east coast where they could have securely anchored the Bounty. 

        I’ve been in a very similar situation, where as a result of feeling pressure to be someplace on a certain day, against my better judgment I talked myself into sailing through similar conditions to what they ran into. I hoped the hard blow out of the north would abate before we hit the Gulf Stream but instead it got worse(!) and if it hadn’t been for a very seaworthy sailboat and the full moon so we could see the monstrous waves and maneuver around the worst parts of them, I have no doubt that we’d have been sunk or rolled almost 100 miles from shore. So, there but for the grace of God go I, and I can very much empathize with the Captains plight as he weighed his options and decided to risk putting out to sea rather than doing what he knew was the safest thing. But it WAS his decision and his responsibility, and nobody elses.

        • Anonymous

          I don’t know what size vessels you work on, but I can assure you that the CotP will most certainly boot you out of port if a hurricane is impending. It has happened to me several times over the years. The CotP can give you a waiver to remain in port, but just try and get one! We rode out a hurricane in Mobile at the shipyard and the USCG was giving me grief for not getting underway– when all 3 Z drives were removed from the vessel! Here is a link to Homeport Mobile’s severe weather plan, condition Yankee specifically spells out that all oceangoing vessels and barges over 300gt Must depart port. https://homeport.uscg.mil/cgi-bin/st/portal/uscg_docs/MyCG/Editorial/20091108/Appendix_205_20Maritime_20Contingency_20Port_20Plan_2%5B1%5D.pdf?id=d49827e167bfdcb2dfd3a3c2b3714fe148314716&user_id=e9e1182028127e9d9361cf4dfb62044f

        • Anonymous

          Another article in a Professional Mariner blog.

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          Riding Out a Hurricane in a Ship

          By Max Hardberger On October 29, 2012

          Image (c) Montenegro/Shutterstock

          By Max Hardberger:
          The decision to ride a hurricane out at sea should never be taken lightly. There may be times when there is no other option – the Coast Guard today ordered large vessels in the commercial ports on the eastern seaboard to put to sea to protect shore assets – but today’s headlines also emphasize the dangers of doing so: the HMS Bounty foundered last night and, at this writing, two lives may be lost. Large commercial ships are theoretically designed to withstand extreme weather conditions, since they can’t count on avoiding heavy weather while crossing oceans. Today, advanced weather forecasting and faster ships encourage operators and some masters to push their luck, but when they miscalculate, someone dies. There is a mistaken belief—I suspect primarily held by landlubbers–that ships are safer at sea than alongside, and that may be the case, especially when the ship is secured to a dock with nothing on the other side of the slip or waterway to hold it off. Another problem could be the lack of scope, with bollards or cleats too close to the vessel to allow the vessel to rise and fall while preventing it from excessive horizontal movement. But under the right circumstances, a master should consider reinforcing the vessel’s securing lines, making provisions for emergency escape should the lines fail, and reducing the crew to the minimum necessary for lay-by, before making the decision to abandon what security the port offers for the open sea. If the master does decide to remain in port, there are a number of things he can do to reduce the effect of the hurricane on the vessel. If the waterway’s depth permits, and if the waterway does not experience excessive currents, he should ballast the vessel down to reduce the effect of wind on the vessel’s securing lines. The house’s ports and non-deadlight windows should be covered with plywood. Special attention should be paid to the spring lines, and the vessel must be secured to hard points on the other side of the waterway, or at least outboard of the vessel, to keep it from smashing against the dock in high winds. Yokohama fenders, if available, can be effective in reducing impact damage. If the master does decide to put to sea, he should realize that he may be exchanging a dangerous situation for a suicidal one. I remember when, in 1998, the Windjammer Fantome left the security of Big Creek, Belize, to ride out Hurricane Mitch. Hammered by hundred-mile-per-hour winds and forty-foot seas, she foundered and sank with all hands. The irony is that Big Creek is one of the best hurricane holes in the Caribbean. Protected to seaward by the barrier reef and the tip of the Placentia peninsula, surrounded by flat marsh with nothing to create flying debris, and in a 40-foot-deep waterway narrow enough for good scope on all sides, with proper preparations the Fantome could have ridden out the storm as secure as a prepper in his bunker. However, once at sea, the master must concentrate on two things: maintaining steering-way and avoiding a lee shore. Steering-way is necessary to keep the bow into the wind and waves. If the main engine fails and the ship falls off broadside to the waves, it will be in a perilous situation. The ship must also have adequate sea room to leeward, both as insurance in case she loses steering-way and to counter the effects of wind, waves, and current. If the master has any doubts about his searoom, he must make way offshore while it is still possible. A situation could soon arise in which the combination of forces could overpower the vessel’s propulsive power, even if operating normally, and drive the ship inexorably toward the waiting reefs. The best configuration for riding out a hurricane would be with at least some cargo onboard. A master who must put to sea in ballast is facing a dangerous situation, as merely filling the ship’s ballast tanks may not prevent excessive flexing and even hull failure. With at least some cargo onboard, the master can adjust his ballast to achieve proper freeboard and trim. Of course, all cargo onboard must be extremely well-secured before the vessel leaves port. There are also navigational techniques for avoiding the worst quadrant of a hurricane, and container vessels and other fast commercial vessels, able to do 15 to 17 knots at sea, may well be able to outrun or at least ameliorate the worst effects of a hurricane.

    • County Escapee

      From their facebook page:

      As Sandy’s massive size became more apparent, a post on Saturday tried to soothe any worried supporters: “Rest assured that the Bounty is safe and in very capable hands. Bounty’s current voyage is a calculated decision … NOT AT ALL … irresponsible or with a lack of foresight as some have suggested. The fact of the matter is … A SHIP IS SAFER AT SEA THAN IN PORT!”

      Doesn’t explain much, but they thought they could go fast enough to outrun the storm. Still sounds pretty careless.

  • Anonymous

    The most current information I have heard is that two of the crew are missing…ABC, CBS & the Boothbay Register reporting…

  • Scott Harriman

    We’ve known about this storm for days.

    Why weren’t they either anchored in a safe harbor or far out to sea by now?

  • Anonymous

    You sunk the Bounty?  Idiots.

    • Could have been worse… They could have sank my battleship!

      Seriously though, hope everyone is ok.

  • Anonymous

    Why ??? Just because it’s an 18th century ship doesn’t mean they can’t check the forcast…Sad…

  • Anonymous

    We could just about count on one of the teabugger trolls figuring out how to make Obama part of this story. What a sad little life you must lead, PJ.

    • Anonymous

      Peter, where do you suppose your friends residing aboard the Condo ship -World- are this fine evening? I doubt that their martini glasses are tipped more than several degrees. 

  • Anonymous

    I was on the Bounty when it was in Eastport this summer for Pirate Fest.
    Good looking boat.
     Too bad its down in Davy Jones locker.
      What was the captain thinking??
    Tragic.
      You can count on the Coast Guard to help.
    Good bunch.

    • Anonymous

      great bunch.

    • Anonymous

       The maelstrom! We  the visited the ship in Belfast/ The crew was  so excited about the Hms bounty. The captain is missing too.

  • Anonymous

     WHy don’t you go breathe underwater

  • It’s a good thing that they abandoned ship, and rescue crews are trained for this…. it’s also good that the crew aboard were prepared 

  • Anonymous

    I took my grandsons to boothbay harbor to see it last month…so sad. 

  • John Doe

    Jessica Black grew up in Orient, Maine. She attended Hodgdon and Houlton schools as well as the University of Maine. She was the chef on the HMS Bounty for this voyage. She had just joined the crew a few days ago. She can be seen leaving the helicopter around 10 min 30 sec in the coast guard rescue vid.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks to the Coast Guard…. What an operation they performed. 

  • Anonymous

    This is a very sad and tragic story and my thoughts and prayers are for the rescued survivors, and the families of  Claudene Christian who lost her  life and Robin Walbridge who is missing.  If there is a lesson to be learned  it is: “err on the side of caution”.  

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