Comments for: Police: ‘Erratic’ Lamoine man used 2 guns to slay father, uncle

Posted Oct. 25, 2012, at 1:06 p.m.
Last modified Oct. 25, 2012, at 4:54 p.m.

LAMOINE | Citing autopsies conducted Thursday, police say Leon Tilden used two guns to kill his father and uncle early Tuesday morning. The two victims — Robert Tilden, 50, and Russell Pinkham, also 50 — died from “multiple gunshot wounds,” according to Mark Belserene, a spokesman for the medical …

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  • Anonymous

    Besides the brutal murders, it ain’t a bad place to live.

    • Anonymous

      N.E.H. has had murder too. 

      • Anonymous

        still not a bad place to live.

        • Anonymous

          I know, I lived there for 21 years.

      • Anonymous

        RIP Maxine.

  • Any place is a “great place to live” but a real bummer of place to get shot to death.

    • Anonymous

      Off the top, can’t think of a GOOD place to be murdered.

  • Anonymous

     Horrific events have occurred in most every community, most people just avoid looking into and/or  thinking about  it.  This is  not such a bad way when it comes to less stressful living.

  • Anonymous

    Times are a changin’… many places have changed… some for the better, some for the worse!

    • Anonymous

      Where has changed for the better? You better not say, everyone will go and it will be worse soon!

      • Anonymous

        I know too but you are totally correct. Keep it a secret if you are blessed enough to find it.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t see why one major crime should sully the reputation of the entire community. If that was the case, major cities wouldn’t attract new residents because they have at least one murder a day. Just keep promoting your community as a great place to visit. And don’t forget the family members who remain and need your ongoing support. Keep them in your prayers and social scene.

  • Anonymous

    Gun-toting retards. Now that is an intelligent statement. So let me get this straight, anyone who carrys a gun is a retard ( a word that I personally despise). Could you expand your comment a little more so someone can see your rational in such a stupid statement.

    • Anonymous

      My guess is that solomon mcnut isn’t allowed to carry one. Once a felon always a felon.

  • Anonymous

    And Skowhegan is a beautiful,metropolitan community with young lasses walking  always around in spring dresses and lads can be seen wearing suits and little clip-on ties as they help elderly woman cross streets.   

    • Anonymous

      Almost sounds like Mayberry :)

  • Anonymous

    @Solomon_McNab  – some free advice, better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt (Abraham Lincoln)

  • A W

    Further demonstrates the great need for better access and mental health care services in this State. 

    • Anonymous

      You mean a mental health care worker should have tried to apprehend the killer vs. the tactical team?

      • Anonymous

        …if you only had a brain….

      • Not to speak for A W – but I think (based on the article) they are under the impression that this is something that to a certain extent has been “building” for at least the last few weeks, and MAYBE (key word here…) if Leon was offered AND accepted mental health care services this tragedy could have been avoided.  Please, correct me if I am wrong….

        • Anonymous

          Oh…so kinda like a utopia.  I think I’m catching on.

      • Joy Eaton

        That’s not what they were saying at all – if there were better services and better access to these services, maybe this could have been avoided. I’m sure that is what they were meaning. Don’t read into something that is obviously not there.

  • Anonymous

    Come on people please. I have never seen so many young people so completely clueless in my life. Walk around the streets of Bangor. Home made tatoos no visible means of supporting themselves there are more time bombs ticking around here then I can count. They smoke butts eat junk food and are clueless what constitutes a life.  No respect for life or their families it is plain scary. Guns are not for hunting but for intimidating and way too many of them. Just a matter of time before another one explodes.

    • Anonymous

      Please. I have a shotgun for killing birds, a rifle for killing deer and a pistol for self defense. I only hope to use the shotgun and rifle but if the situation calls for it I will be some glad I have that pistol. It fits nicely in my pocket in case one of those” ticking time bombs” in Bangor decides to go off.

      I have another collection of guns as well but those are just for close family and friends in case they ever need one. Let’s hope and pray they don’t. 

  • Davida Willette

    the warning signs were there . they should have called for help for his son sooner. get his son blue papered

    • jerrymyx

      and YES maybe the young man wanted to go in for help!!!!!!!

    • Anonymous

      Being blue papered doesn’t always work. A police officer took a relative of mine to the local hospital and filled out the paperwork after this individual indicated he wanted to hurt himself and/or someone else. He verbalized that to the police officer who assured my family it would be some time before we would see him again. It was less than 35 minutes at which time he took a knife and tried to hurt his wife. He was successfully subdued and taken to the local lockup. He woke up in the morning thinking he was in Mass where he once lived and had no idea he had tried to hurt his wife. He suffered a few moments of agony thinking he had hurt her, until he was reassured she was fine. He was returned to the local hospital because of the irrational behavior where a CT scan revealed a small brain bleed that had been ignored by a different ER doc the previous evening. The first doc assumed he was drunk, ran no tests, and sent him home rather than waste her time working him up.  That story had a good outcome, unlike the Perley Goodrich Jr, saga in 2009. It would be better if a family member can convince a person to go for help and then insist to medical personnel that there are radical changes in a person’s behavior and be there to provide a health and mental health history.

      • Anonymous

        I get really tired of armchair doctors judging that what physicans do and don’t do due is to laziness or lack of empathy.  CT scans are ordered when someone has had a head injury, changes in speech or coordination, altered consciousness, vision changes, severe headache, seizures, nausea/vomiting, etc.  From what you’ve described (though there could have been more you don’t know about) he was taken to the ER for being suicidal and homicidal.  It was AFTER his irrational behavior, apparently attributed to mental instability, that he showed clinical signs of something warrenting a further check.  Perhaps a better choice of words would be “unfortunately there seemed to be no signs that signaled the first ER doctor to order a head CT and the brain bleed wasn’t discovered until after he had a psychotic break.”  A family member can’t ‘insist’ an expensive test be done if there are no valid reasons or evidence to warrent it.  Read these articles if you’d like to educate yourself on brain bleeds.  
        http://www.medicinenet.com/brain_hemorrhage/page2.htmhttp://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1163977-clinical

        p.s. I’m glad to hear your family member is ok.

        • Guest

          007

          • Anonymous

            I don’t dispute errors happen.  It’s an unfortunate thing.  But non-medical people who complain about how ‘the doctors didn’t do this’ or ‘they did absolutely nothing for my family member’ do not know what they are talking about.  Either the medical staff didn’t spend enought time educating them on why or why not certain tests or treatments are done or the patient/family didn’t ask enought questions.  Or a combo of both.  For someone to be sitting in a waiting room or on the sidelines and then say ‘stupid doctor didn’t do anthing to help my family member’ just shows a great amount of ignorance (meaning in a medical knowledge way, not an insulting way).

        • Anonymous

          Perhaps this time you are judging a situation for which you didn’t have all the details.

          I am an X-ray tech with 20+ years in an ER environment. I have CT and MRI experience. In addition to my x-ray experience, I also worked in the neurosurg suite at MGH while aiding in development of a computer program to monitor hearing during acoustic neuroma surgery. 

          He was not taken to the ER solely for being suicidal/homicidal. He expressed these ideations while trying to refuse medical care for two falls. One down the front stairs of the home and one down the basement stairs while trying to elude the ambulance crew. The officer who blue papered him had been sent to assist locating him. Both falls resulted in LOC and the first fall left a 12cm scalp laceration that was not sutured and still bleeding when he returned home in under 35 minutes. Part of the problem that night was he was taking a new prescription for Klonopin which was filled as 2.5mg. but written for .25mg. So he had 10x the amount he should have been started with. In addition to existing MH problems, he was recovering from a Whipple procedure for pancreatic cancer and was diabetic because of it.

          I don’t think he suffered a psychotic break at all. Because of the brain bleed, Klonopin was withdrawn and later restarted at 1/10 of the dose he initially had. The following morning when the police brought him back to the ER, his blood sugar was also precipitously low. He was admitted until his blood sugar levels were stabilized and it was determined that no further bleeding was taking place.  He was detoxed from the high level of Klonopin and his behavior returned to normal. He was sent to Acadia for observation but it was determined that he was stable and advised to continue to be seen regularly by his local physician and returned to the ER if new problems occurred. It was advised that his history be documented and given to any ER physician that might have a need to see him.

          Thanks for your kind sentiments on his recovery. That was a scary time for his family. He has since succumbed to an accident believed to have occurred after he came confused due to another incidence of low blood sugar.

          • Anonymous

            I certainly didn’t mean to insult your intelligence, and had the first comment you made included even a fraction of this information I would have completely understood.  All you said was he was brought it for making homicidal/suicidal comments.  That being said, I can see now with the history how a CT should have been done.  That’s scary about the Klonapin.  One of the things they slam home hard in nursing school-watch your decimals!!!!  Again, I appologize. :)

          • Anonymous

            Please, no apology is necessary. I took no offense. I didn’t include all the details because I felt they weren’t relevant. He was specifically blue papered for making those comments which were more or less elicited in order to use the blue paper option as he had been up and down for a few days. The falling and the disappearing act were the last straws so to speak. 

            He did have a brain bleed which may have contributed to the violence that night, and likely the overdose of Klonopin was key in his emotional state. Had he been successful in trying to hurt his wife, then an entire family would have been as affected as the Tilden family here, or the Goodrich family a few years ago. In this person’s case, the DA dropped all charges after hearing what actually took place. 

            The local PD was instrumental in getting this man the help he needed. First they took him to the ER in a cruiser, cuffed. They took him into custody when the hospital failed to keep him or help him and took him back in the morning as soon as the shift changed in the ER. I know not every officer is sympathetic, but I am lucky to live in a place where just about all are.

            EDIT: I still maintain the ER doc that night was negligent. He later received over 30 sutures for the scalp wound she failed to suture and he required hospitalization to be sure the head injury was stable. He was detoxed from a med he was being overdosed on and it was not good practice to allow a 58yo male to WALK several blocks home with all of that going on. She did not know that he had any of those conditions because she did not bother to work him up. But it may have been just as inappropriate to allow someone who appeared that “intoxicated” to be out wandering the streets after multiple falls, even if that is what your diagnosis was.

          • Anonymous

            Wow in regard to the ER doc.  Who misses a gaping head wound?  Really glad it all worked out.  I know, especially in the ER, workers can be hardened due to all the drug-seekers and ETOH pts that walks throught the door and I’m sure some are too quick to dismiss one as simply a ‘psych case’.  Of course, this isn’t the norm!

          • Anonymous

            Sadly, I don’t think she missed it. I believe she ignored it. His behavior was definitely off and I think she just dismissed him as drunk. She is known, as a former drug addict, herself, to have no patience with drug seekers or drunks. But a head wound of that size, still oozing blood, and the paperwork from the transporting officer, should have been a flag that something more was going on. Not only did she risk his life, but his wife could have been killed or worse his kids, who were young then, could have been hurt. That whole situation was a recipe for disaster and she let it walk out the door.

            To be sure, in my years in the ER, I have seen some, wonderful, caring and compassionate people, doctors and nurses. But then there are some, I wondered how they ever got out of elementary school, let alone med school. I guess someone has to be at the bottom of the class.

    • Anonymous

      It isn’t as easy as you seem to think to get help for those with mental illness.  They can be suicidal and if they answer the professionals questions correctly they will not be admitted for help.  The sad part is the mentally ill usually know this and play the game very well.  Erratic behavior will not get them blue papered, fear for your own safety or safety of the person will not get them blue papered.  Many of these seriously ill people are not “sick enough” in the eyes of those who could help.  Staying on medication is not necessary.  They can go on and off meds as they choose.  If the sick person doesn’t want the help is is next to impossible to get them help.  They usually end up trying to “self medicate” and then when they get hooked on street drugs and decide they want help with that problem there is very little help other than detox and methadone.  The freaking system is broken!!!!  My heart goes out to all involved.

  • Cant Fix Stupid

    I just wonder what dad and uncle did to set this guy off…remember there are2 sides to every story.

    • Anonymous

       Thank you for saying that. People on these forums seem to forget that…

    • Anonymous

      Objection, your Honor, the statement calls for speculation.
      I did not know the father and son.
      Rest assured, Russell was only trying to help his family.

    • Nicole Marie

      I strongly doubt it was anything that deserved being shot to death………

  • Anonymous

    There just has to be something done to change our laws so that erratic people can be removed from those to whom they pose a threat. It’s just too late to wait until they fire that first round. By then someone is usually dead and someone else soon to follow.

  • Anonymous

    Seriously…as members of your community ,you all need to learn about the progression of Bath Salt use and the “erratic” behavior it causes!!

    • Anonymous

      Bath Salts, Methadone, the powerful narcotics or even these new psyche pills are all chemical substances that nobody is really prepared to deal with because they don’t fully understand the long term impact on the brain. The old tested drugs that date back 50 to 60 years we understand the long term health risks and how to manage them. These new chemicals haven’t been around long enough to be sure but they sure aren’t off to a good start.

      • Anonymous

        Yes, but bath salts have been around long enough and in the news long enough,that people need be pretty damn aware of what is going on around them.It is a pretty scary thought!You can read about bath salts and think you know about it but go to You Tube  and watch videos…it’s very disturbing!!

    • Joy Eaton

      I don’t see any mention of drug use in the article. Why jump to bath salt use? Maybe he used previously and wsa suffering from the after effects – we don’t need to jump on that right now. Bi-polar depression, if left untreated, causes erratic behavior as well.

      Also, why did the officer shoot him multiple times? Wouldn’t once would have been sufficiant if shot in the right place to disarm him. His mother and family I’m sure would have like to have known why he did this and for them to have closure; not all of these unanswered questions. The use of deadly force with police officers seem to be extreme and constant now.

      • Anonymous

        We don’t know yet the details of the shooting. But a three shot quick fire to disable someone in an urgent situation is common. Do you think the officer should shoot once, see if Tilden would return fire, then shoot again? And if you’re thinking all the officer had to do was place one well-aimed round in Tilden’s gun hand, you’ve been watching too much TV.

        • Joy Eaton

          I never said anything about shooting his gun hand – I simply said that he could have made a non lethal shot to disarm him. I don’t know the details of his death, just saying that there are many stories lately of lethal shootings on the officers end that could have been avoided.

      • Anonymous

         I did not just jump to bath salt use.I formed an educated opinion based on my knowledge of what is going on in the community and also on  2 pics shown of Leon in which one shows a fairly healthy and somewhat alert person the other showing a somewhat physically and possibly mentally and emotionally deteriorating person.The fact that family members stated that they were concerned about his erratic behavior in the past few weeks also tend to sway me more toward that opinion.Yes mental issues can manifest suddenly  but mental unstability certainly would have been recognized before the last few weeks.The simple fact that you think we don’t need to “jump’ on this issue is exactly why this is continuing to happen.

        • Joy Eaton

          You see so many people on here that automatically blame bath salts. I feel that until we know further details, this should not be proposed as the cause.

  • Anonymous

    He was just exercising his second amendment rights until he pulled the trigger. Remember, guns don’t kill people, people do. If any effort had been made to remove his guns before he pulled the trigger, the NRA would have screamed foul. Crazy people have rights too.

    • Anonymous

      The NRA is way too political.

      • Anonymous

        No kidding. I remember when I was a kid and my dad got American Rifleman. It talked about gun safety and target shooting. Last month’s edition cover: “defend freedom, defeat Obama”. The fact that Obama has disappointed liberals with his lack of action on gun rights is irrelevant.

  • wm fennelly

    In and during times as hard as they are , it saddens me to see tragedies like this happening in Lamoine..I have lived here my whole life , and it’s only the past 30 years that this aggregious activity is taking place…It seems to me that suppressing the ability to reprimand your own children is the driving force for all the disrespect towards ones’own family…Maybe America should look at the whole issue with “child abuse”  laws , and give the ability to reprimand your own children back to the parents… And Robbie and Russell were two of my closest friends…Leon WAS NOT mentally unstable….He just didnt RESPECT his father..And thats the “NEW NORMAL” for most youngsters between 16 and 30 years of age…My career was in Law Enforcement so I have vast knowledge with these types of activities and if we , the parents arent instilling respect in our children , then they wont have any…

    • Anonymous

      Here, here! A long time ago, a friend of mine was in a store with her 12-year-old daughter, who kept acting up. After several admonitions, my friend told her that if she didn’t behave, she would put her over her knee and spank her right there. And she would have. The daughter was more terrified of being publicly humiliated than paddled. She recognized that her mother had every right to discipline her for naughty behavior and never considered the idea of calling authorities to report “abuse.”

    • Anonymous

      I would agree with you 100% if your rights to reprimand your children was being suppressed. Unless they passed some new law, like yesterday, it is still every parents right to reprimand, spank, ground, and punish anyway the parents see fit as long as it doesn’t cause injury to the child.

    • Respect isn’t something that can just be hammered into a child. It must be earned. (Not speaking of anyone specifically, just in a general sense)

      There are a lot of people who I disrespect. I certainly am not planning their murder. Anyone that would murder their father and uncle in cold blood has a mental issue.

      • Anonymous

        Exactly.  We must give respect, and demand it in return.  One can’t talk harshly to their children and expect their kids to speak nicely and respectfully back to them.  When we are disrespected, we must make it a point that it won’ t be tolerated.

        • Fear and respect are often confused.

          • Anonymous

            I agree.  Not sure if you mean a child is respectful of their parents which is why they don’t talk back, or if they’re just scared of them.  I think a good indicator is when I get glowing reports from other adults/parents that say how polite and respectful my children are.  We push manners, have children use Mr. or Mrs. unless an adult gives them permission otherwise, and use our good manners for our kids to see.  I don’t think a child obeying and not talking back to a parent strickly to avoid getting a good wallop is the true meaning of respect.  I feared disappointing my parents way before I feared a spanking. 

          • Intimidation would perhaps have been a better descriptor.

    • Anonymous

      I agree with your opinion on not being able to dicipline as parents.  But… I heard.. (hearsay) that he was abused as a child and IF that is true your theory would not fit here.

    • Anonymous

      Sometimes there is an inability to respect one’s parent, vs an unwillingness to do so. I think it may be a learning disability or something that takes root in a child’s formative years. It may be a part of a mental illness. Just because someone doesn’t run around acting “crazy” or so very differently from every other person does not mean there is no mental illness or a behavioral problem that is a reaction to some type of trauma (?PTSD). 

      Both of my kids learned respect from an early age. I would like to say it is the way I raised them, but I don’t think I did anything all that special. My kids rarely required discipline because they always have done pretty much as they were told. Interestingly, my kids seem to be polar opposites, personality wise, but they are so close they can finish each other’s sentences, almost like twinning. 

      I have a close friend with two sons. Her kids, like mine, have polar opposite personalities, yet they are close. Not as close as mine, but they certainly get along. One of her kids is so disrespectful while the other would do anything for her and would never even think about raising his voice to his mother. Both were brought up in the same household, with the same rules and expectations etc. I cannot understand why one is so wild and the other so good. I am pretty sure the wild one has personality issues that the other just doesn’t have.

      I am so sorry for the losses suffered by the Tilden and Pinkham families and for the community at large. I think all of us commenting here are trying to make some sense of the senseless tragedy that is so much bigger than all of us. 

  • Anonymous

    It really does not matter how many and what type guns the family had..the guns didn’t kill—- a disturbed individual choose to use them to end life. This is a tragic event.  Prayers and sympathy to the surviving family.

  • Anonymous

    If families without insurance have a family member that is exhibiting signs of mental illness with potential danger, try to get them to an ER of a larger medical center. They are better equipped to deal with such patients and have more staff that can work on getting them into a psychiatric facility. The larger hospitals all have fairly generous sliding scales and free care available. They will be able to find a patient a place with similar fee structures. It is more important that a person receives the treatment they need. Many pharmaceutical companies have programs that will help those without means to pay for meds. My son, who has no insurance, takes an ADHD medication that costs approximately $80. per pill but his pediatrician filled out paperwork that allows us to get his meds for free. 

    It does take some leg work, sometimes, to get the services a family member may need but it can usually be done. Often times, the larger hospitals have social workers who can help a patient get on Mainecare as well. The point is, go with a family member and be honest about their situation. Don’t say self-employed if the person just doesn’t work, say unemployed, etc. The mental health dollars are harder to come by, but with some persistence and help, they can be found. Most of those with uncontrolled mental health issues don’t have the ability to do it for themselves, that is why so many fall through the cracks, but with some patience, usually the family can come to the rescue.

    • Anonymous

       A family member of an adult with mental illness finds it nearly impossible to get help for their loved one if the loved one does not want help.  Lepage has stopped Mainecare  for single adults.  As far as the bigger hospitals, I have set in some of those places telling them I feared my loved one might hurt themselves or others and they would not keep them.  I have traveled from one end to the other of the state only to be told nothing could be done until they DID something…..how crazy is that!  When you do get them in a hospital they end up doping them up so much that they can hardly function.  It’s a darn broken mess!

      • Anonymous

        The system is definitely broken, there is no doubt about that. There are far too many mentally ill adults living on the streets or in jails.

        That nothing can be done until they do something is incorrect. Someone is not doing their job. There is the blue paper option, which the local police can use, although that is not always effective if you come upon a physician who won’t take the time to seriously consider the patient. It is best if you can chronicle a person’s behavior, have copies of medical records that detail tests, diagnoses and meds used in the past. That is why it is better to use the larger facilites and keep escalating up a chain or repsonsibility.

        This is all easy to say and much more difficult to effect, especially if a person is not willing to receive treatment or is non-compliant. We do have to advocate for our loved ones with mental health issues and sometimes that means being very persistent. When you are told you have to wait for something to happen, ask what kind of event needs to occur before that person can or will help. Health care personnel have the toughest time signing committal forms because of laws enacted 30 or so years ago saying a person can’t be held against their will. But there are exceptions, we know that. So you need to know the exceptions and be able to document how your loved one fits an exception.

        When my family member was discharged with a brain bleed, after having papers filled out by a local police officer, I looked into a malpractice suit and was told without demonstrable damages, which we had mitigated by subduing and having him arrested, we had no case. He was taken back to the hospital by the police and admitted for medical issues and subsequently transferred to Acadia. 

        My best suggestion is don’t give up. Know your rights vs. the patients right and seek help from law enforcement if you need to. That is a really tough way to go, but it would be better than what happened to these families if it gets that bad.

  • Anonymous

    OMG you people are so BLIND!! Argue argue argue!! Think!! Can’t you post something that shows a mentality of an adult? BDN? You need to monitor these posts much more closely..Come ooonnnnn…

  • Anonymous

    Erratic behavior of shooting raccoons  in the middle of the night??  It is raccoon season and they are shot at night by all hunters.  

    • Anonymous

      When people suddenly begin doing things that they don’t normally do, that is called acting erratically. It doesn’t mean that shooting raccoons at night is inherently aberrant behavior. 

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