Comments for: Bangor drug problem makes residents feel like ‘hostages’ in their own homes

Posted Oct. 05, 2012, at 7:18 p.m.

A few weeks ago a young woman in the late stages of pregnancy lay writhing in the middle of Webster Avenue North during a weekday afternoon. Neighbors say she was flipping out on bath salts and incoherent and combative. A few nights ago, on the same street, a Webster Avenue …

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  • Bob Conti

    I read this and weep.  Growing up in the 60’s and 70’s, the backdoor to our house was unlocked most of the time, and keys were left in the cars.  Kids bolted out of the house in the morning and weren’t seen until the street lights came on.  It wasn’t utopia; people who were “different” either by race, sexual orientation and the like were often bullied and hopefully things have improved along those lines, but drug-related shootings?  Really? 

    • Jonathan Smith

      Kids played outside, no video games – families had values – actual values – and people knew better to get crazy because they knew that people would hold them accountable. Crime and punishment – but we have no punishment – we treat druggies like victims and pat them on the back rather then giving then weaning them off of the drugs and having serious consequences for their actions. Hold people accountable when they screw up – that’s tough love – but that is NOT what our courts are doing. Maybe Bangor needs tougher judges – a tougher DA – maybe lawyers muddle the process too much. In any case – this is an epidemic and the liberal solution is to build more methadone clinics and legalize every drug available. More like a surrender flag.

      Some would blame the police or some other third party – but so many drug cases get thrown out and the laws aren’t tough enough. We need a judicial system that functions – not the circus we have in some courts. There are some good judges and I dare say lawyers – but they are rare in Maine.

      • Kevin_Of_Bangor

        Your first sentence is a joke as kids still play outside, not all have video games and plenty of families have actual values but people have been getting crazy as long as humans have been around. We have plenty of punishment as the United States has more people locked up than any other country.

        As for tougher judges, fight to get new ones if you don’t like the current ones. Don’t think the current DA is doing a good job, fight to get a new one but you won’t.

        As for legalizing every drug available? Are you off your rocker? Bath salts have been banned but the folks that make the drugs keep changing the formula so they can keep selling them under a different name. You think liberals are at fault for that?

        If you had your way you would just place a bullet in everyone’s head that is convicted of a drug crime and if that is not how you feel are you going to lock them up inside a prison that is already over crowded or should we build some more to keep them locked away?

        Methadone does work for a lot of people, not all but it does work but you seem to think you have the answer, so type away and tell me the fix.

        • Anonymous

          You’re right that we do have the most people locked up of any other country but how many of those people are incarcerated because marijuana is a crime?  How many people are locked up as repeat offenders, specifically violent repeat offenders.  We have to many laws and the ones we do have hold no teeth where punishment is concerned.  

          As for legalizing all drugs, I don’t know about that exactly but then the war on drugs hasn’t worked.  All prohibition has done is bring in drug cartels from other countries the same way it did the mob when alcohol was illegal.  I know we don’t see it much up here…yet, but I have to believe that if something doesn’t change we’re going to be having gang issues here as well.  (Perhaps we already have with the three murders in Bangor?)  The world is becoming scarier every year and no I don’t have the answers all I can say is that if we don’t figure something out quickly our quiet little state of Maine isn’t going to be so quiet anymore.

          • Kevin_Of_Bangor

            There are a lot of very bad people that smoke marijuana and I’m glad a lot of those people are locked up. How many 30, 40 or 50 year old’s are locked up because they only enjoy smoking marijuana, have a job and are productive citizens? I would say the number is very low.

            Soft drugs tend to go hand in hand with hard drugs when it comes to those that are locked up for extended sentences. If marijuana was legalized you are still going to have people dealing in harder drugs that smoke marijuana.

            We have NASCAR because alcohol was illegal. Would have NASCAR ever took off as it did if alcohol was legal? Maybe, maybe not.

            As for the world, it has been a scary place for a very long time. It has been a scary place long before you where born and it will be a scary place long after you are dead.

            Crime, drugs and smuggling are not new and they never will be. Pass all the laws you desire and something will be illegal regardless and someone or something is going to profit from it.

            Maine is still the safest places in the US to live in. If you desire to move, go ahead. I’ll stay for awhile.

          • Anonymous

             Kevin – you had me until we got to this post.  The criminalization of marijuana does affect people who are employed and productive.  We’ve read several stories in the recent past about individuals and families being incarcerated for growing marijuana.  It doesn’t matter to me whether these folks were growing for themselves, or to supply us with marijuana for our responsible enjoyment.  They were productive and employed and now they’re sitting in a jail cell chewing up expensive resources.  We need to decriminalize marijuana.

          • Anonymous

            Wrong about pot. I haven’t smoked for 30 years but I do know lots of very productive people that do. Some that  own businesses, are professionals, employ a lot of people and are perfectly normal, but unlike you Kevin, they smoke rather than drink (and that’s risky behavior).

            My son came up from Portland a while back and left his car somewhere off Cedar St. and walked downtown with his friends, he works all over New England, and he said that walk through Bangor was the sketchiest place he’s walked though.

            I feel bad for the people in Casino City, it’s a nice town but it’s gotten seedy….BTW, my rural neighborhood has also taken the plunge, but no bath salts yet, I guess that’s strictly a Bangor drug.

            I am happy that  a couple of beers satisfies my weekend drug urge and am glad it’s legal!

          • The world is NOT “becoming scarier” Some people are becoming more scared. I
            absolutely unequivocally refuse to become a sheep.

        • Bubba Hendershot

           Liberal post^

          Well it is a liberal paper. I disagree with your statement because most people want to take advantage of the system. People who do actually want the help are often grouped with the people who want the advantages of being in the situation they are in. Wouldn’t you like a hot meal, a place to sleep – your methadone, housing, food stamps, medical assistance, etc. if you could get it?

          • Kevin_Of_Bangor

            So you know for 100% face that most people want to take advantage of the system? If so, please share your facts. I doubt you will or can.

            As for your second statement, again. Provide some facts to back up your claim.

            As for you thinking I am a liberal you are way off point. I hold many conservative values and I hold many liberal values. That is why I am registered as an independent but being that I am an independent I take the time to look at the entire picture, unlike you that will not take a moment to step back, ask a few questions and figure out the best solution. 

          • Bubba Buoee the people you speak of are usually those that have fallen on hard times and are working toward being independent once again.

          • In answer to your final question;

            No, I actually enjoy working, and I don’t want anyone running my life for money.

          • Henderson bobby

            Ya like those people who made billions on insider trading , lies and deception. Banks get a trillion in bail out then show record profits? Why did they not have to pay back with the long dollar like people with poor credit.  Problem is we all (Most) want something fro nothing rich and poor alike. 

      • Jonathan this is why it is so important to support The Acadia Hospital. This institution does its very best to assist in these types of situations, providing the care that individuals need to cope with the diseases of addiction that have ravaged the Queen City.

        • Oh Please;  Acadia hospital does almost NOTHING for lots and lots of money.

          • Anonymous

            I must agree with Tux Katz. Acadia Hospital provides room and board for the time the insurance will pay. My observation of Acadia is that is does a good job of creating lifelong clients.

          • Acadia is always there for those that need it.

    • Anonymous

      Right, Bob, when reading these articles abour young people either murdering or being murdered my heart sinks. We have come a long ways, yet with the angry rhetoric and pessimism thrown at our youth why are we surprised when they turn to dope for their hope? Every one of us makes a difference; hopefully mine is positive and encouraging. The bad apples are few, but it is time they were contained. That will only happen when we ALL get involved and assist getting things back on track.

  • Anonymous

    I am a landlord just not in the Bangor area. What is happening is not okay, but that landlord needs to be held accountable for who he/she is renting to. Obviousley he/she doesn’t care about his/her property or the neighborhood.  I own rentals in a party town and go out of my way to maintain a quiet respectful building.

    • Bubba Hendershot

       most landlords apparently don’t do thorough background checks. if i were in your shoes I wouldn’t rent to anyone with anything under “violent, drug related, or other serious” crime. Section 8 housing needs to be more strict as well. Not to put these people on the streets – as some are trying to better their lives but one must come up from the gutter that is Bangor.

    • RJ

      IF you are a landlord… then you understand that the laws of the State of Maine restrict what a landlord can do & are heavily, very heavily slanted & weighted towards the tenant.  Go ahead & publish the names of the landlords.  No problem w/that.  After that, then what?   From your post, it seems that many of these (your?) tenants know the laws better than you do. I’m guessing that you live in a two family or a home w/an inlaw apt.   I do agree that tenant selection is the most important aspect when evaluating a potential renter, but after that, you have very little control over people who know the system. 

  • Anonymous

    It will be important for any new ordinance to address the issue of ownership.  We need to know the names of the people whose lousy business practices are ruining our neighborhoods.  There’s been one felony drug bust in my neighborhood. and the Landlord is someone well known in this area.  He should be ashamed of the way he’s running his property or short of that, he should be shamed.

  • Anonymous

    Obviously the problem would be solved if there were a few young families with good credit who were willing to live in an old motel.

  • Anonymous

    Time to start packing (and I don’t mean to move).

    • Kevin_Of_Bangor

      I have my CFP and I carry but you better make damn sure someone is trying to take your life before you draw your weapon and if you do shot someone you most likely will get arrested. So you might want to make sure you have the number off a good defense attorney handy as you are going to get asked a lot of questions after you have shot someone.

      I enjoy being armed but it would take a lot for me to shot a crazed druggie, even someone on bath salts.

      • Bubba Hendershot

         I agree with this. I would like to get a license and a gun as well but the only instance I would shoot someone is if I was either being shot at or someone was coming at me with a blade

      • Anonymous

        i know martial arts and can disarm and kill you at the same time i will still need an attorney it is catch 22 how sad the world we are in today the thugs have more rights than we do but it is always self before the thug that said i will not shoot someone unless i am shot at

        • Kevin_Of_Bangor

          I love it when people say they know martial arts. It makes you a very predictable fighter.

  • Does anyone remember the movie ” Walking tall ” quit the crying and start carrying a big stick, and tell me a jury of my peers will convict me for protecting my family.

    • Bubba Hendershot

      why can’t we take the law into our own hands. it was done for centuries. granted we can’t go out and kill each other for simple theft – but like that guy in texas who killed the guy who was molesting his daughter – if I had children you’d better believe there’d be blood if someone did that to my kids.

      • There was a guy (also from Texas) who shot a homeless person for walking across his lawn.  Where do we draw the line? (Rhetorical)

  • A lot of people are turning into scum…

    •  Thats because people are scum. Hard to not turn into what you are born to be.

  • Bubba Hendershot

    The stuff that has happened to Bangor in the last 5-7 years specifically has been extremely disheartening. I live about an hour north of Bangor and usually find myself there at least once a week, and went to college at Husson from 2006-2008. Because of this I think I’m very familiar with Bangor but I do not see what happens on daily occasions. When I was growing up and up until I got out of college I believed Bangor to be a great city that eventually one day I might of considered moving to. But what has happened to the city? How can we reverse it? Can it be fixed?

    The short answer is what I believe to have been Bangor City Council’s decision (at the time Susan Hawes was city manager) to allow people with mental issues, homeless, drug users and other criminal element to come to the city to seek aid by creating methadone clinics, homeless shelters, specifically this “Hope House” and various other outreach programs. By creating these things for people the city gained revenue from state and federal assistance for the enlargement of the police force, more social programs, and various other things such as the beautification of several areas of Bangor. This may not be the entire cause but it definitely did contribute to it.

    Another thing I have noticed (a lot of people consider this racist so bear with me) is the growing population of minorities and poverty stricken people in the area. Not every crime is committed by these people but more than often you see homeless “transients” as they are described in this paper being arrested for assault, robbery, public intoxication, and causing other disturbances. Every time I go to Bangor I see at least one homeless person with a sign, and have been approached by several disheveled people asking for “50 cents for the bus”. This happened at the Zac Brown concert, at Shaw’s Main Street, and other places downtown. The situation downtown is horrendous and I am afraid to park my car anywhere but Abbot Square. In fact whenever I come to Bangor for an extended period of time I usually take the cab.

    Another situation is that white people who are starting to act like “gangsters” with baggy clothes and often are on some type of drug – like marijuana, coke, heroin, the bath salt, or drunk – who walk around Bangor. This is evidenced by the “lolipop tags” around bangor on mailboxes, telephone poles, etc. Another issue is the growing sex offender population in downtown bangor – go to familywatchdog.us and do a search of Bangor, Maine and look specifically at downtown Bangor near the children’s museum – the results will shock you.

    In my opinion Bangor can only be fixed by reversing its previous decisions. Landlords should be held accountable for tenants behavior – more thorough background checks should be done – especially in Section 8 housing (where I believe random “code enforcement” checks should be done as well). The city should try to curb panhandlers by creating a fine for anyone who stops in a public way to give out money – this is as dangerous if not more than talking on a cell phone (I’ve almost personally rear ended someone handing out money) – of no less than $50 each time. Panhandlers should be rounded up and at the city’s expense bussed to the homeless shelter and not allowed on the streets. Known “transients”, drug abusers, mental health patients and others of that sort should also be forced to get treatment or removed from the city. Programs such as the “Hope” House should be enforced more strictly, and patients on methadone should be forced similarly to random tests and supervision.

    I can’t wait to hear what exactly happened to the three people who were killed in Bangor 2 months ago. I think this is going to open up a HUGE hole in Bangor from the speculation that I’ve heard about what happened. I won’t post those comments right now but it will rock the community if this turns out to be true.

    • Kevin_Of_Bangor

      You are a young kid that listens to a lot of Glenn Beck, Rush and Fox news. You won’t admit it but you do. I will park my car anywhere in downtown Bangor and not worry about it. I will walk anywhere in downtown Bangor and not worry about it and I will do it with my daughter as I have done for many years.

      You one day will grow up and maybe when you are in your 40’s, such as I am you will learn a lot more about the world around you instead of listing to the fear mongers around you.

      • Jeeze Kevin… I’m about to have a heart attack!!!

        I agree with you 100%

        Bangor occasionally disgusts me, but it is surely not “fear city.”

        • Anonymous

          Me too. I almost always disagree with Kevin, but we are 100% in accord on this issue. First time for everything.

          Kevin, that said, while I don’t always agree with you, I always read your posts because they are generally well thought, well put, and respectful.

      • Anonymous

        you tell him kevin tell him talk to the hand

    • Anonymous

       First of all, Hope House has been in Bangor for 40 years. Second, The City did not ‘create’ these outreach programs, however, if it weren’t for these ‘outreach programs’ many many more people would be living on the streets, in peoples backyards, etc. As for the 3 people who were killed in Bangor, their murderers have been arrested and are currently awaiting trial. Maybe you should educate yourself in facts before you go on a tirade of “I’m better than you are” and learn about mental illness, addiction,  and homelessness. All you appear to know about it is what you are reading in the newspapers or hearing on the news. Even our media outlets in Bangor don’t have a firm understanding of what these issues are and seem to make up what they want as they go along.

      • Bubba Hendershot

         i am better than you are.

        i am god. praise be unto me.

        • Guest

    • Anonymous

      “Panhandlers should be rounded up and at the city’s expense bussed to the homeless shelter and not allowed on the streets.”

      Completely unconstitutional.

    • Anonymous

      This is the fourth or fifth time I have seen this rant of yours and I can’t take the inaccuracy anymore.  You have tried tying the methadone clinics to the waterfront improvements.  This is completely untrue.  The funding used for the waterfront and other “beautifications” you mention come from the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG).  This has nothing to do with the methadone clinics or the money they generate.  Please refrain in the future from trying to make that connection.  Thank you in advance.

    • Bubba

    • Anonymous

      I do not live in Bangor, I live about an hour away. I have been there many times since I moved to Maine ten years ago, but I do not see the day-to-day activities. I lived very near Boston, where some areas of that city have many of the same problems. 
      You have some ideas but they are not solutions.

      1. “Panhandlers should be rounded up and at the city’s expense bussed to the homeless shelter and not allowed on the streets.”  Many of these have no source of income because they can’t get or keep jobs due to addictions, mental health issues, physical disabilites etc. You cannot hold them hostage in a shelter, if they go out they will undoubtedly find their way back to a place where they know they can get a few dollars panhandling. They need income. Giving them an income and a home might help many but how do we propose this at a time when our governor is looking to cut those very services.

      2.”Known “transients”, drug abusers, mental health patients and others of that sort should also be forced to get treatment or removed from the city.” It is really difficult to help those who don’t want to be helped. And for those that do, the resources are sorely lacking. Many do not have jobs or health insurance and there are no places that can afford to do this for free. I do know of someone who sobered up at Hope House but that is a seriously limited program and no one in Bangor wants it to expand in their back yard. You can’t just force people to leave a city. Put them on a bus and half or more will be back in no time. 
       
      If no one can rent to persons who have been convicted of crimes, then there will be more families on the street. I agree there  needs to be a level of accountability, but there needs to some more comprehensive plans beyond that. If a landlord evicts those causing trouble, they need to be able to find other housing or they will become a bigger part of the problem. Bangor has enough homeless “transients”, creating more will ultimately add to the problem. Maybe the courts need to start sending some of the repeat offenders to jail for a period, although that is going to create problems for those when they get out. I don’t have the solutions, unfortunately, that needs to be a group think, for long term successful solutions.

    • Jeeze Bubba;  If Susan had not moved all these people you mention to Bangor, they would still be in Millinocket.  Better one big pile of garbage than a bunch of small ones.

  • Anonymous

    Why not print the name of the property owners? They do that to Hope House all the time. However, if the City of Bangor were to hold these folks responsible for their own actions, and if Penobscot County Judges were to impose stiffer penalties for these occurrences,  Maybe the problem would solve itself.

  • Is this type of crime more prevalent in a free society?  

    Have you ever read that this kind of foolishness is not tolerated in a totalitarian state? 

    There, those in charge of enforcement make an arbitrary decision and you are simply shot on the spot.

    If you’re really serious about ridding your neighborhood of petty crime, you might take a good look at our two presidential candidates and vote for the one you think leans the most to the right.

    The humble Farmer

    • Anonymous

      I think the best part of the freedom we have, that freedom that so many have fought and died for, is that we have the freedom to find humane solutions to our problems. Some of these problems have gone unchecked for a number of years, partly linked to the economy we are currently living in. A workable solution is going to be a long term proposition and it is going to cost money. We need to look at the overall cost, not just the dollar amount. Look at the savings we have made to date, these problems are the cost of doing away with mental health programs, cutting welfare rolls so that people are living on the streets etc. Before we hold landlords accountable so they evict troublemakers, we had better consider where these folks will end up. The right wants to do away with so many outreach programs, to save money, but that is just putting a finger in a dam, not a solution to the problems that plague our society at the moment.

      Your post makes me really want to vote for that candidate that leans more to the left, because I don’t want to live a totalitarian state. I value my freedom and I value yours.

    • …but look closely because the one who “leans most right” also ownes a bunch of low-income rentals. 

      • Anonymous

        quess you realy dont no the truth about our leader from chicago he put a lot of people in the slum

        • No fan of his either. 

          As a U.S. citizen and resident, I have no “leader.”  The Constitution clearly states that the people lead.  Government officials are (in theory) our employees.  They are supposed to do OUR bidding, not the other way ’round.

          Don’t feel bad, the NEWS media, corporate interests and even government officials talk of elected “leaders”  Maybe, while I was sleeping “We the people” ceded our position of leadership to this political trash.

          I’ll have to check that out.  Maybe it is time for another revolution.  Jefferson said we should have one every twenty-five years.

  • I have to admit, could not be happier that I moved away from Bangor 5 years ago for a lot of reasons, but especially given the fact the Queen City is now essentially being dubbed the “Bath Salts Capital of the World.”

    Lock your doors Bangor.

  • RJ

    This is one neighborhood. This situation plays itself out all over this town. I don’t
    care where you live. The effects of the rampant hard core drug use affects everyone.  The car break ins, home break ins can be directly tied to drug use.  No matter where you live, you have the potential to be a victim.  The offenders are mostly late teens, twenty somethings.  These low lifes will target anyone.  Many of these “people” are on public assistance of some sort.  (& no, I have no problem w/people who need help, getting help.)  Why isn’t there mandatory drug testing for anyone receiving any type of public assistance?

    • I almost agree EXCEPT your age limit is not correct.  The five people in the Target circle arson don’t conform to your limits, neither do many on the court pages of this very newspaper. 

      • RJ

        Thanks for your thoughts.  I did generalize the ages based on experience about the scope of this hard core drug madness that is affecting many, many innocent people although I believe that Nicolle 24, Luke 28, Daniel 26, do make the overall point.  Worse, all three of the people killed were parents.  I AM making a broad observation that an entire generation seems to be lost in their own pursuit of drugs while the peripheral & collateral damages are infecting another entire generation.

    • Anonymous

      I am not suggesting we give more to those on assistance but the very small amount allowed is not enough to maintain a drug habit. That is why they have to go out and steal or burglarize homes etc. Trust me, I am NOT trying to justify or condone these actions, just making a point.

      Addiction is a progressive disease. It progresses in some much faster than others. But ultimately, addicts and users reach a point where they can no longer maintain a job and sometimes cannot even manage to keep a home. These are the majority of those causing the problems in Bangor’s neighborhoods (and every other city and town). Real solutions will need to address the real problem.

  • So no one seems to be able to stop, or even slow the drug problem in Bangor. Guess it is time to find a new scapegoat to blame.

    While I agree that landlords should be responsible, and keep their property clean and well maintained, I draw the line at landlords being responsible for the behavior of their tenants. These people are adults, and the idea that landlords should become “enforcers” for people that even cops can’t control is a real stupid idea.

    I suspect that the people who suggest this “solution” would be afraid to even talk nicely to the folks they want controlled. Have they ever issued an eviction notice to a tenant? Have they ever cruised through these places at night when the unwanted behavior is at its worst? I sincerely doubt it, because I have. I collected rents and did maintenance for MITA reality in Lawrence Massachusetts. I was licensed to carry, not an easy accomplishment in Massachusetts as you have to prove you are subject to extreme and continuing danger to get this permit.

    The fact that I carried a weapon did not stop tenants from assaulting me, attempting to rob me, and throwing human urine and feces at me from the top of the buildings. We were able to keep the garbage picked up, and we also made a valiant effort to screen tenants, but it was often the nice looking girlfriend with a young child who signed the lease.  Usually the thugs who later cause problems stay in the background until the lease was signed, and or the “at will” rent was
    paid.  

    Rental property (on the low-income end) is not a very profitable business.  Tenants skip out on the rent, they steal copper pipes, and kitchen appliances, they live rent free for months because courts refuse to act in a timely manner to remove tenants for non-payment.  Then when they finally go they smash windows, punch holes in walls, and leave the apartment full of garbage which must be hauled away.
     
    Landlords also pay heavy property taxes on their property, which is almost always considered commercial.  These taxes help pay for police fire protection and schools.    Believe me when I tell you that the landlords usually would like this drug induced behavior to stop. We also wish tenants would behave themselves.

    I sympathize with Webster Avenue residents.  I know what they are feeling.  I lived very close to a property like this in Massachusetts.  I regularly had to move homeless people out of my garage, and pick up the wine bottles on my lawn.  I also drove my teenage children EVERYWHERE when
    we lived in that neighborhood.  Unfortunately it is not the property which is the problem, it is the people.  Landlords are no better at controlling the flow of drugs than are the police, civic groups, or even parents.

    If Bangor does decide to put the burden of this social disease on landlords, what will they do to assist them in this effort?  Will the courts act faster on evictions?  Will the police arrive in a
    timely mamnner when property managers report drug use or other illegal activity, and will the police act to protect those folks which the City has placed on the front line in the “drug war?”

    I am also wondering how this new law will affect government owned nuisance property?  Will the Feds and the State be subject to the same fines and penalties as private landowners??

  • Anonymous

    Alcoholism, drug abuse, poverty and homelessness are societal problems. Making the landlords responsible may not be the way to go. I doubt even the most irresponsible landlord wants this type of problem on his/her properties. These are often not the most responsible tenants either. But even these slum lords, if you will, provide a service to the community that most of us would not be bothered with. There is a demand for these lower cost dwellings, all of which have costs and care associated with them, even if it spending money to have others do the work.

    In this economy many social welfare programs are on the chopping block. Many have already fallen victim to cuts. We are cutting back on the services so many of these people really need. We need MORE mental health programs,not less. We need MORE residential treatment facilities, not fewer. We need more social workers to help the homeless find homes and keep them. Not all of our homeless are addicts and criminals, some have just fell on hard times. 

    We need more and better programs to reintegrate convicts back into society. Our prisons need to focus on rehabilitation and job training, not solely punishment.

    Unless we are willing to invest in our communities, and I realize in this current economy, that is a difficult task, we will keep having the same issues over and over. You can make it a police problem, a political problem or try to shove it off on the landlord, but unless we address the core problems of behavior, then there will be no solution.

  • Henderson bobby

    Some of these fine upstanding people are so motivated by greed and self interest it is not even funny.

  • Anonymous

    “We need this ordinance so that property owners take some responsibility here,” On the surface, this statement makes sense, however, if an ordinance is passed, it should be much more clearly stated. I’ve had several instances when I’ve had to call the police (not in Bangor) because of a disturbance in my home pertaining to a roommates and/or relative who was under the influence. I wanted the person causing the disturbance removed from my home to prevent an escalation. What I was told by the police was that because the person(s) also resided at my residence, I had no legal right to prevent them from entering the residence. The article above began with reference to problems at private homes that had to be addressed. If a gentle ‘open ended’ ordinance is passed, not only could a landlord be held responsible, if a private residence was repeatedly involved because of proximity to a place where drug use and/or other types of ‘illegalities’ were being perpetrated, the owner of that private property could be held responsible based solely on the number of time the police had to be called to that property.

    On the other hand, a landlord does have the right to evict a tenant who is involved in drug use and/or repeated domestic altercations. All that is required is a simple rental agreement. If a rental agreement is in place, and the landlord continues to allow a tenant who violates that agreement to remain, then the landlord should be held responsible.

    Nothing wrong with passing an ordinance to make a neighborhood safe, just be sure that the ordinance doesn’t place private land owner in a position of responsibility for the actions of outsiders.

  • i am just curious how this all is ,,,,A PERSON ON SECTION 8 CANT SMOKE MEDICAL MARIJUANA  IF HE OR SHE IS ALLOWED TO ,,,BUT LIVES IN THE SAME APT, BUILDING WHERE ANOTHER FAMILY OR FAMILYS LIVE WHO PAY RENT ON THERE OWN OUTTER POCKET ,,,CAN SMOKE IT IN THERE APTS, NOW THERE ARE LEAGEL TO BUT THE ONE THAT NEEDS TO THAT ON SECTION 8 IN THAT SAME BUOILDING   CAN`T,,,ISN`T ,,,,,,,,THAT DRICIAMATION ,,SO CURIOUSLY ASKING WE ALL BREATH THE SAME AIR IN HALL WAYS AND GETS IN OUR APTS, THROUGH OPENING DOORS AND IT ALL IN THE AIR ,,,MY MONEY BUYING THE LEGAL LICENCE IS NOT GOOD BUT THE ONE THAT PAYS OWN RENT IN FULL CAN USE IT ,,,WHY IS IT EVEN,,LEGAL IF WE NEED IT   WE NEED IT ,RITE,,BUT CANT SMOKE IT ,WE ARE DRISCRAMITADET BY THE GOVERMENT HOUSEING  ,PROGRAMS,,SOME OF US ARE PUSHING 60 YEARS OLD AND NEED IT TOO NO MATTER WHERE WE LIVE ,HELP ON THIS   ISSUE  FOR MANY PEOPLE  PLEASE ,

  • David Leon Ackley Sr. 29 minutes ago i am just curious how this all is ,,,,A PERSON ON SECTION 8 CANT SMOKE MEDICAL MARIJUANA IF HE OR SHE IS ALLOWED TO ,,,BUT LIVES IN THE SAME APT, BUILDING WHERE ANOTHER FAMILY OR FAMILYS LIVE WHO PAY RENT ON THERE OWN OUTTER POCKET ,,,CAN SMOKE IT IN THERE APTS, NOW THERE ARE LEAGEL TO BUT THE ONE THAT NEEDS TO THAT ON SECTION 8 IN THAT SAME BUOILDING CAN`T,,,ISN`T ,,,,,,,,THAT DRICIAMATION ,,SO CURIOUSLY ASKING WE ALL BREATH THE SAME AIR IN HALL WAYS AND GETS IN OUR APTS, THROUGH OPENING DOORS AND IT ALL IN THE AIR ,,,MY MONEY BUYING THE LEGAL LICENCE IS NOT GOOD BUT THE ONE THAT PAYS OWN RENT IN FULL CAN USE IT ,,,WHY IS IT EVEN,,LEGAL IF WE NEED IT WE NEED IT ,RITE,,BUT CANT SMOKE IT ,WE ARE DRISCRAMITADET BY THE GOVERMENT HOUSEING ,PROGRAMS,,SOME OF US ARE PUSHING 60 YEARS OLD AND NEED IT TOO NO MATTER WHERE WE LIVE ,HELP ON THIS ISSUE FOR MANY PEOPLE PLEASE FOR MANYi am just curious how this all is ,,,,A PERSON ON SECTION 8 CANT SMOKE MEDICAL MARIJUANA IF HE OR SHE IS ALLOWED TO ,,,BUT LIVES IN THE SAME APT, BUILDING WHERE ANOTHER FAMILY OR FAMILYS LIVE WHO PAY RENT ON THERE OWN OUTTER POCKET ,,,CAN SMOKE IT IN THERE APTS, NOW THERE ARE LEAGEL TO BUT THE ONE THAT NEEDS TO THAT ON SECTION 8 IN THAT SAME BUOILDING CAN`T,,,ISN`T ,,,,,,,,THAT DRICIAMATION ,,SO CURIOUSLY ASKING WE ALL BREATH THE SAME AIR IN HALL WAYS AND GETS IN OUR APTS, THROUGH OPENING DOORS AND IT ALL IN THE AIR ,,,MY MONEY BUYING THE LEGAL LICENCE IS NOT GOOD BUT THE ONE THAT PAYS OWN RENT IN FULL CAN USE IT ,,,WHY IS IT EVEN,,LEGAL IF WE NEED IT WE NEED IT ,RITE,,BUT CANT SMOKE IT ,WE ARE DRISCRAMITADET BY THE GOVERMENT HOUSEING ,PROGRAMS,,SOME OF US ARE PUSHING 60 YEARS OLD AND NEED IT TOO NO MATTER WHERE WE LIVE ,HELP ON THIS ISSUE  PEOPLE PLEASE

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  • Here’s a recent photo of Bangor Efficiency Apartments:  
    bangorbytes.com/2012/10/bangor-efficiency-apartments.html

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