October 23, 2017
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Comments for: ‘Makers’ paves the way for women’s rights

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  • Anonymous

    Glad to see that something is being done to educate young women to the history of our rights. As a non-traditional student, I’ve been in several classes in which the plight of women of other cultures were discussed. The discussion most often turned to how glad the young women are that women in American have always had these rights. Sadly, when I explained to the class that we have had the rights to make our own decisions about our education and our bodies for a relatively short time, I was met with total disbelief and was actually asked questions such as which rock I had been living under.
    Even more sadly, when the subject is broached today, young women react with apathy at the possibility of women being returned to second class citizen status through political action. Most common is the statement, “I’m not worried; it’ll never happen.” Hopefully, this group of Makers will be able to educate young women to the fact that not only did it happen, but if it isn’t taken seriously and protected, it will happen again. I’d hate to think that everything that I lost because I stood up for my rights as a human being would be for nothing because the younger generation does not believe that history repeats itself.

  • Anonymous

    Much progress has been made. The current generation has no idea.

    I was born in the 1940s. In high school, though I was near the top of my class and hoped to enter medicine, I was told females can’t become doctors. Girls could take biology but for some obscure reason weren’t allowed to take physics or statistics. Girls played basketball on half the regulation court (thus with only one basket)–we followed “girls’ rules.” If the boys needed the gym or field, we were evicted.

    All seniors took a standardized test to do with vocational interests. One girl learned the hard way that if a female checked off too many “male” interests, a special scale identified her as unfeminine. She was mortified. Another girl hoped to become a veterinarian. When her parents got wind of this, they staged an intervention–her entire extended family confronted her about this terrible job for a female–she’d have to reach into the backside of a cow to deliver a calf! She recanted and was forgiven.

    Want ads were divided into “Men” and “Women.” It was legal–and expected–for women to be paid far less than men for the same exact work.

    In college, when I told my (male) advisor I hoped to become a college administrator, he told me to become a Kindergarten teacher (I had not taken teaching prep courses, had no siblings, and had never babysat–zero interest in little kids at that time). When I asked my favorite professor’s advice, he urged me to get married (I was between boyfriends at the time).

    A college friend of mine (unmarried) who visited a doctor to discuss contraception was physically shoved out of the office. When she finally did get a prescription, a pharmacist refused to fill it, and refused to return it to her! A friend who had been raped nearly died from a botched back-alley abortion. Another was raped by a “doctor” as a prerequisite for an abortion. A third was raped by her father as punishment for being a fallen woman–she was now fair game, by his standards.

    When I tried to discuss a need for more rights for women, with a college classmate, he grew pale and said: “But… but… that would mean the end of the double standard!”

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