Comments for: AG: Secret indictment in triple homicide not unusual

Posted Oct. 02, 2012, at 6:56 p.m.
Last modified Oct. 02, 2012, at 9:42 p.m.

BANGOR | The existence of murder charges and warrants against two men police say shot and killed three local people in a drug-related homicide in August was kept secret to give police a chance to find them before they knew they were wanted, a state prosecutor said Tuesday. “In …

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  • Anonymous

    Good job….Do what is best to catch these guys, these posters here dont need to know every little detail what is going on with this investigation. They will survive..

  • Anonymous

    Ah…yes…BROCKTON.

    • Anonymous

      Worse than Boston ever thought of being!

  • RJ

    This thing is bad all the way around. Obvious career criminals & a very, very dark downside to the insanity of hard core drug involvement.
    “What is unusual is the dispatcher in Brockton was happy to talk to you,” Stokes added.
    It may be the Brockton division of the Keystone Kops, but it’s been almost two months since this thing went down w/out any results.  Will be interesting to see what shakes out eventually.  These two suspects don’t look like criminal masterminds.

  • Anonymous

    good job bdn with your big mouth just like you gave away information about the gps in the drug heist whos side are you on you are not on the side of law and order the police should charge the editor for every pharmacy robber who gets away from now on

    • Anonymous

      Exactly, I appreciate the BDN’s effort to get the story out there but they have worked against the general interest of the public with some of the information they have released recently.  

      Just relax a little Nok-Noi, you have the rest of your life to sell papers.  Respect the efforts to catch these guys before they know the cops are coming.  And lets not teach the  drug store robbers how the cops are trying to catch them.

      • Anonymous

        You don’t think they know the cops are coming? Anyone with an IQ over 50 should be able to figure out that if you kill three people (who you were seen with the same night), it’s only a matter of time before the cops show up. 

      • Anonymous

        SEEMS LIKE THE BANGOR POLICE DEPT ARE DAMNED IF THEY DO AND DAMNED IF THEY DON T!

    • Anonymous

      Oh please, if the BDN can figure it out (a month and a half later…), you can be sure the criminals were already two steps ahead of the game. 

    • Kevin_Of_Bangor

      The GPS tracking units are nothing new and have been in use for sometime. This is not the first time the BDN has published that information. Dye packs have been used by banks for a very long time but people still rob banks.

      Try doing some thinking before you go on a pointless rant.

      • Anonymous

        angry

        • Kevin_Of_Bangor

          Only when it comes to stupidity.

    • Anonymous

      No compromise , “with your big mouth” ?
      Yours must be a hard, sad life. 

      At some point the public knowing that they are  wanted makes sense.
      It works for the FBI TEN MOSTED WANTED LIST … and a TV show, too.

      What is YOUR solution ?
      We all read your silly complaint, and it just don’t hunt .

      • Anonymous

        Hot off the press :

        1 OF 2 TRIPLE-HOMICIDE SUSPECTS REPORTEDLY ARRESTED IN MASS.
        18 mins ago 

        NEW BEDFORD, Mass. — One of two men sought on fugitive from justice warrants in connection with a triple homicide in Bangor on Aug. 13 ..

        See, how well it worked, Joe ?

      • Anonymous

        I have to agree 100% with you.  Many people on the Wanted List have actually been apprehended because the public spotted them and reported it. By keeping this information SECRET as we have heard over and over by the AG’s office and the BPD, they not only keep the public worried and scared but also in danger.  Why wouldnt they want innocent people to know who to be on the lookout for?  Is more innocent lives lost worth that?…I dont think so.  This thing went national this morning on HLN and now one of them is behind bars…you cannot make me believe there is no correlation in that.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t read it.

    • Anonymous

      The job of a newspaper is to inform the public, not help the police.

      • Anonymous

        not if it goes against a court ordered secret indictment

        • Anonymous

          The paper didn’t break any laws.

    • Anonymous

      Read.  It was the Brockton police who let the cat out of the bag.

    • Anonymous

      What does a pharmacy robbery have to do with a triple homicide and it’s suspects?   Aren’t they two separate stories,  and two separate incidences?       Jeeez, if I were a reporter for the BDN,   I would certainly consider them separate and distinct………….give it a break.

  • Anonymous

    If Sexton was arrested shortly after being released shouldn’t the suspended part of his sentence kicked in? He shouldn’t have even been on the streets. And since it was widely reported that police knew who the victims left the apartment with I think he probably knew he was being looked for. Maybe if it hadn’t taken a month to issue a warrant they would’ve both been caught.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t you love our justice system???

  •  “In circumstances where we don’t know where they are, it gives us an
    advantage,” said Assistant Attorney General William Stokes, head of the
    criminal division in the Maine attorney general’s office. OH YEA.. RIGHT! There are a million set of eyes out there that, could have possibly,  identified those two VIOLENT repeat felons and the DA’s office want to keep it a secret who they are. Another “Fast and Furious”.

    • Anonymous

      Attorney General’s Office. The District Attorney’s Office has nothing to do with this…Fast and Furious is a federal debacle that armed thugs with American weapons which backfired and killed dozens of people including a Border Patrol agent…nothing to do with this. The issue is that they didn’t need any help until the Grand Jury Indicted these individuals. When there are no charges, no one can be arrested beyond a couple of days after a crime. It is called probable cause and it diminishes over time. Does anyone here ever understand, even one time, that an arrest does nothing if the person can be bailed from jail. These things take time and and hundreds of interviews. Because someone “heard” what happened through Facebook or a druggie friend, does not make a good case against someone. These comments are borderline ridiculous at times. People will be arrested and then will be prosecuted and then will be sentenced. It is never about the arrest except on the television. It is all about the strength of the case and the ability to PROVE that the person did the crime. An early arrest can sometimes cause a case to go down the tubes and you only have one shot at prosecution (double jeopardy). I am sure these cops and prosecutors couldnt do our jobs and we cannot do theirs. Enjoy the articles and let the reporters do their jobs as well. People slam on the BDN and staff constantly. In this age of endless streams of information, it is still difficult to confirm information from those sources.

  • Elizabeth Reed

    Sad there was a need for this article to explain what should be obvious.  And sadder that BDN missed the point of their own article.  

    You screwed it all up, BDN.  

    Where is social responsibility in the media?  There isn’t any.  It’s not about “keeping the public informed,” it’s about readership and ad sales, plain and simple.  That’s business… but please don’t pretend your intentions are sincere.

    • Alec Cunningham

      It’s not as if this article made me buy the paper today.

      I’m glad we have nosy reporters.  

      • Elizabeth Reed

        Readership isn’t limited to print edition circulation, hence our discussion here.   

        • Alec Cunningham

          Exactly.  How does this sort of journalism sell newspapers?  Especially when more people read the articles online than in the paper?

    • Anonymous

      Social responsibility? Well, as a citizen, I would want to know whether the guy next to me at McDonald’s is being sought by the police in a triple-murder case.

      • Anonymous

        I agree, and think it’s the press JOB to make us aware of such things if they have information to that effect.  

        I also think that LE needs to carefully weigh their desire to keep details of their investigations secret versus the impact on public safety of doing that.  In this case, I admit that I don’t know all the rational that LE might have had for keeping the identity of Sexton and what he looked like a secret, but based on the very basic facts of this case that I know, it seems ridiculous that they thought Sexton might be caught unawares after he knew he was seen leaving the party with the victims and it was his car they were burned in.

  • Anonymous

    get these S.O.B and make them pay

  • Anonymous

    The BDN is doing some fine reporting on this story.  Nice job and keep up the good work.

    • Anonymous

      Why does this comment not surprise me!

  • If law enforcement is actively looking for an individual, the word gets out very quickly that the person of interest is being sought.  “Secret” indictments or not, there is no way the public is not going to find that an individual is wanted.  The public may, in fact, be the best resource for tracking down these thugs.  If the public is kept in the dark, valuable information may not make its way to law enforcement.

  • Anonymous

    Omg  such horrible punishment for the crimes they have commited  ONLY IN FRIGGIN Maine! Judges need to be re elected,not there for life! You would see a difference,,,Mainers are FRIGGIN SICK OF IT!

  • Anonymous

    I wouldn’t be surprised if law enforcement knows where one or both of these “men” are. Just because there is a warrant out doesn’t mean the first beat cop that sees them grabs them and carts them back to Bangor. These men are viewed as armed and very dangerous. There will be a lot of planning that goes into this take down, not Bid Laden scale, but worthy of a great deal of planning.

  • Anonymous

    they got daluz in mass new Bedford another arm pit

  • Anonymous

    Randall Daluz was just arrested in Mass. Good job!!!    Now go get the other one boys!

  • Anonymous

    The BDN had a huge bold headline 15 minutes that said they got the Daluz dude. Then it mysteriously disappeared.

  • Anonymous

    When you look at the size of the BDN on Monday and see how few pages there are, it’s quite apparent the paper is in serious trouble.  Much of that teeny, tiny edition is ads, so the actual news content is extremely small.  So, if the paper can try to eek out some kind of story to sell more papers they will do it.  The purpose of the BDN is NOT to report news, it’s to generate revenue.  The word ‘newspaper’ really now is an oxymoron.  It’s actually a “history paper”.  In BDN’s defense, however, this web-site is quite informative.  They also do a public service by letting readers vent in this comment section. 

    • Anonymous

      So, do you subscribe?

      • Anonymous

        Not any more!  Cancelled about a month ago.  I do like, however, as I mentioned in my first comment, the on-line version.  It is up-to-date and FREE!  AND, I don’t have to recycle the paper. 

        • Alec Cunningham

          Well, that sounds kind of selfish.  With that sort of attitude, it’s no wonder the newspapers are having issues.  We get the paper delivered every morning that it’s published.  I value having the paper in my hands without the need of a computer or network or electricity.  Recycling doesn’t take any effort with curbside pickup AND we help keep people employed from the people who make the ink and the newsprint to the people who work for the Bangor Daily News to the person who delivers it.  I love getting the paper!

          • Anonymous

            I’m always a little surprised that people who profess to be concerned about the environment keep having massive amounts of paper delivered to their door by fossil fuel burning cars and they never seem to notice the contradiction.  Forests are cut down and lots of really nasty chemicals are used, both air and water pollution are generated by making paper. Then there’s all that ink that is produced and used as newsprint but never read by anyone! All this paper is delivered to your door and you probably read less than 10% of the words in it. Recycling the paper may make a slight difference but it’s not even close to the environmental savings that would occur if all those trees could still be standing and all those chemicals could never have been produced and all those vehicles used to deliver the newspapers could have remained in their garages. I’m all for a free press and an informed public, but we now had MUCH more efficient and non-polluting ways of delivering what journalists have to say than by cutting down our forests and polluting our rivers and air.

          • Alec Cunningham

            I see what you’re saying, but then EVERYTHING could be analyzed like that.  I do what I can in other areas of my life, but sometimes I feel that the costs are worth it.   I see the paper as freedom from the computer sometimes.  It’s a convenience I value.

          • Anonymous

            Huh?  Why is it selfish?  The BDN offers it at no charge AND it’s far more up-to-date than the print edition.  The BDN gets paid for the service by the many, many advertisers on the website.  It’s a win-win.  They offer it FREE, I use it and the advertisers foot the bill.  Why is that a problem for you?  Besides, the delivery would be mid-afternoon where I live, but I can ‘read’ the paper early in the morning.  So, again, why is this selfish?  The BDN encourages me to do it–so why do YOU have a problem with it?  If you get a coupon in the mail for a product and it’s FREE, do you throw it away because it would be ‘selfish’?

          • Alec Cunningham

            You know as well as I do that this is nowhere near a win-win for the newspaper industry.

          • Anonymous

            Oops, sorry you didn’t read my post correctly.  I didn’t say my reading the BDN on-line was a win-win for the newspaper industry.  I was referring to the on-line edition of the BDN.  I find it quite ironic and amusing that you praise the actual paper you get, but you also are on-line, as evident by your posting where you can communicate with other readers.  Let’s see you do that with a piece of paper.  If the on-line edition isn’t good enough for you, THEN WHY ON EARTH ARE READING IT RIGHT NOW!!!!!!!!

          • Alec Cunningham

            I am reading my email, right now, if you want to know.  And I never ever ever said that the online edition isn’t “good enough” for me.  I was responding to comments about how people don’t like nor buy the paper version.  I think that they compliment each other-I am not advocating one over the other.
            What’s amusing is that people think that online editions make money for the newspapers.

    • They no longer own the building on Maine Street.  They have half the number of “reporters” they had in the seventies, they have far more “syndicated’ folks on the op-ed page, leading to a far less local flavor.

      The New York Times is “in trouble” the Bangor Daily News (that I grew up with) is dead!

      • Anonymous

        I see no record in the Registry of Deeds indicating the publisher no longer owns the building.

    • Anonymous

      “The purpose of the BDN is NOT to report news, it’s to generate revenue.”

      Yes, newspapers are a business. And that business is informing the public. I can guarantee you that no editor is thinking of selling newspapers. That’s not an editor’s job. And the publisher is too busy looking after the entire operation to concern himself with a particular story. There are bigger things for him to worry about.

  • Mike Lange

    “Massachusetts privacy laws do not allow the public to run statewide criminal background checks, and the law bars law enforcement and prosecutors from sharing any criminal conviction data …”

    So how’s that working out for you folks in the Bay State?

  • Anonymous

    The BDN valued the “scoop” higher than LE’s need for the advantage.

    • Anonymous

      It’s not the press job to work for LE, but it IS their job to keep the public informed. It’s very important that the press and our government are two separate entities!

      I think there’s a good argument to be made that the BDN should have reported about Sexton much sooner than they did, given that he was an “armed and extremely dangerous” individual and could have been traveling amongst us with none of us having any idea about what he looked like for the past 6 weeks!  Don’t you think that the press has an obligation to inform the public in a situation like this so we can try to avoid becoming yet another victim of his?  Two weeks ago, if Sexton had knocked on my door and said his car was broken down and he needed to use my phone to call AAA, I probably would have let him in because I would have had NO idea who he was.  That said, there are times when it’s probably appropriate for the press to not report everything they know about an investigation but in this case it obviously did no harm since the suspects were arrested AFTER the suspects were known to all of us, NOT while we were being kept in the dark as to their identity.

  • Anonymous

    How do we get Mass to come up here and pick up the rest of their trash?

  • Anonymous

    Hmmmmm. Considered ” armed and dangerous”  thats an obvious.

    If he comes around my area…….I will utilize the 2nd amendment.
    I own a gun and I know how to use it.

    • Alec Cunningham

      Can we just pick off wanted men if they come around our area?

      • Anonymous

        Well, not exactly, but if wanted a wanted murderer somehow gets in your house and says anything you interpret as threatening your life….in most Maine homes, he won’t be telling his “recollection” of your discussion in court.

        Maine has among the highest per capita gun ownership rate in the nation, and among the lowest violent crime rate and I’m thinking that’s probably not entirely a coincidence.

        • Alec Cunningham

          Well, sure, but “coming around our area” is not the same as getting in one’s house.  It seemed that the person who made that comment was saying that if he spots the guy anywhere near him, he’ll shoot him down.  I’m all for guns, ownership, classes, etc., but the Wild West scenario he alluded to seemed too much.

          • Anonymous

            I agree with you, thus the “not exactly” at the beginning of my post.

    • Anonymous

      No…… if he comes on my property …..He will not like the greeting at the door. If he threatens… well then you figure it out. I am exercising my 2nd amendment right. He his on the run. I would imagine looking for money , food and whatever it takes to survive.

    • Anonymous

      The Second Amendment protects your right to own a gun. It does not grant you the right to shoot people with it.

  • With these guys track records, convictions and violent tendency’s why the heck were they not incarcerated longer for previous crimes? Maine needs not only the death penalty,  but needs to crack down so much harder on criminals like these. Criminal’s like this expect 3 hots and a cot with t.v, conjugal visit’s and all the gang related activity within the prison walls as possible.  Come on Maine get harder and set a standard.

  • Guest

    So many scared little sheep in Bangor.

  • Apparently the BDN didn’t like my last comment as they deleted it. It was not explicit, or racial by any means, in-fact it was a call to the State to get harder on men whose criminal backgrounds were as violent as these men were.

    I guess the BDN has taken a page out of Obama’s book… control the media and censor the people who actually confront the government and state on their failures. Let me say this. If the state government would have done a better job at locking men like this away three people would still have been alive today.  Now three little kids have no parents, and have to grow up without them.

    Though these parents were troubled and had some unfortunate current and past experiences, though they didn’t deserve to die like that.

    Drugs are an issue in our state, crime is rising, poverty levels are getting higher, and local police are getting their hands tied even more.

    Good, contributing, hard working Maine citizens are becoming victims and are scared for their families, and the future of our state because of the lack of initiative  by our state government to hold criminals such as these accountable.

    So in conclusion. Stop tying the hands of our public servants, stop BDN censoring voices like mine who are demanding accountability from our state, and may I ask that the State of Maine get harder on men like this who are victimizing people in our community for their own selfish, and criminal ambitions.

    SET THE STANDARD!
     

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