Comments for: Mitchell decries political discord, urges increased voter participation

Posted Sept. 25, 2012, at 5:30 p.m.

ORONO | Political discourse in the United States is worse today than it was early in the 19th century, when personal attacks were rampant and duels were considered an honorable way to settle disputes between political rivals, according to former U.S. Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell. Mitchell, a …

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  • Anonymous

    This from a hugely divisive guy in his day. Wow. Reagan must be rolling over in his grave.

    • Anonymous

      Do you mean the Reagan who was responsible for a 10.4% unemployment rate?

      • Anonymous

         Yup and Mitchell who managed to kill the small boat industry in Maine with his 10% luxury tax.  Yup georigie was real good for the state of  Maine.  Mayhap as good as Snowe and probably as good as the King will be.

        • Anonymous

          The rich people of America have the rest of us over a barrel.  Isn’t that just a little bit irritating, just a little?

          • Anonymous

            Rich people run both major political parties…doesn’t that irritate you?

          • Thank you for pointing out that Democrats are also rich.  People seem to forget that, In 2007 only three of the top ten wealthiest congressmen were Republicans.

            Today the list is not very much changed except that Vern Buchanan moved up a notch when Ted Kennedy left.

            Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas) $294.21 Million
            Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) $220.40 Million
            Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) $193.07 Million
            Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) $81.63 Million
            Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) $76.30 Million
            Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) $65.91 Million
            Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) $55.07 Million
            Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) $52.93* Million
            Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) $45.39 Million
            Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.) $44.21 Million
            Rep. Jim Renacci (R-Ohio) $35.87* Million
            Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) $35.20 Million
            Rep. Rick Berg (R-N.D.) $21.60* Million
            Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) $21.18 Million
            Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-N.J.) $20.35 Million
            Sen. James Risch (R-Idaho) $19.78 Million
            Rep. Gary Miller (R-Calif.) $17.45 Million
            Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) $17.00 Million
            Rep. Kenny Marchant (R-Texas) $16.45 Million
            Rep. Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.) $15.46 Million
            Rep. Richard Hanna (R-N.Y.) $13.73** Million
            Rep. Mike Kelly (R-Pa.) $11.90* Million
            Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) $11.60 Million
            Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) $10.69* Million
            Rep. Diane Black (R-Tenn.) $10.63* Million
            Rep. Tom Petri (R-Wis.) $10.60 Million
            Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) $10.38 Million
            Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) $10.35 Million
            Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) $10.28 Million
            Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) $10.14 Million
            Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.) $10.14***Million
            Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) $9.88 Million
            Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) $9.84 Million
            Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) $9.43 Million
            Rep. Nan Hayworth (R-N.Y.) $9.35* Million
            Rep. Shelley Berkley (D-Nev.) $9.29 Million
            Sen. Herb Kohl (D-Wis.) $9.23 Million
            Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-Texas) $8.53 Million
            Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-Texas) $8.51* Million
            Rep. John Campbell (R-Calif.) $8.44 Million
            Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) $8.18* Million
            Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.) $8.03* Million
            Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.) $7.94* Million
            Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) $7.93 Million
            Rep. Bill Flores (R-Texas) $7.71* Million
            Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) $7.41 Million
            Sen. Kay Hagan (D-N.C.) $7.06 Million
            Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) $6.56 Million
            Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.) $6.47 Million
            Rep. Randy Neugebauer (R-Texas) $6.21 Million

      •  Jimmy Carter (who couldn’t run a junk-yard without help) was responsible for tanking the economy.  He was also responsible for interest rates that peaked at 22% gasoline prices which doubled on his watch, and a general stagnation of the economy.

        Reagan came to office in 1981, and coincidentally, the interest rate dropped, the gasoline prices halved, and the employment picture got markedly better.

        Now I do not attribute all this to a “President” or even to an administration.  Market forces have a way of superseding politics or even strong government policy, but if you are going to blame Reagan (alone) for the 10.4 (I can’t find any reference of a 10.4 unemployment rate during Reagan’s presidency but if you say so it must be correct)
        then he also must get credit for cleaning up Carter’s mess. 

        At the time I didn’t have an opinion (being 12 in 1980)

        • Anonymous

          You can’t find the 10.4 because the highest annual unemployment rate under Reagan was 9.6 (see the annual statistics at http://www.bls.gov) according to the Department of Labor.  When Reagan left office in 1988 the annual average unemployment rate was 5.5%.  

          • Anonymous

            The information on unemployment came from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  And I was wrong.  The unemployment rate was 10.8, not 10.4, in November and December, 1982.  Reagan had been in office for 22 months.  Here is the website:  http://data.bls.gov/pdq/SurveyOutputServlet

            I looked into interest rates, too.  I found the 30-year fixed mortgage rates from Freddie Mac.  In January, 1981, when Reagan took office the rate was 14.90.  The average for 1982, Reagan’s second year in office, was 16.04.  For 1983, Reagan’s third year it was still 13.24, and for 1984 it was 13.88.  That would have been Reagan’s fourth year.  The average for 1988, Reagan’s last year, the rate was 10.34. 

            Gasoline prices in 1979 dollars tells an interesting story.  During the Carter administration, gasoline prices were $2.83 in July, 1979, $3.50 in July, 1980.  In January, 1981, when Reagan took over, it was $3.73.  In January, 1982, $3.43, and in January, 1983, $3.31.  By January, 1985, the beginning of Reagan’s second term, gas was $2.52.  In January, 2001, when Bush took over, gas was $1.56.  By September, 2005, it had risen to $3.67, and in July, 2008, still under Bush, the price was $4.71. 

            Jimmy Carter graduated from the Naval Academy and trained for nuclear submarines under Admiral Hyman Rickover.  That strikes me as being kind of demanding.  I am certain that it is more than I could have done.  After leaving the Navy, Carter built a successful business as a peanut farmer.  I know peanuts might seem kind of trivial, but no more so than, say, sporting goods or office supplies.  And peanut butter is very good combined with chocolate as we all know.

            Ronald Reagan graduated from Eureka College after studying economics and sociology.  In other words, liberal arts.  I know I could have handled that because I did.  Then, of course, he had a successful career as an actor, starring in among other films, Bedtime for Bonzo.  He also was host for Death Valley Days.  His military service in World War II consisted mostly of assignment to the First Motion Picture Unit in Culver City, California, making propaganda and training films.   

      • Anonymous

         Sorry but bend over on this one, as that never happened, review your history. He inherited a Jimmy Carter inflation rate of over 13% and a faltering, stagnant economy. During his terms in office we had a boom time. Check it out. This from Wikipedia:

        Many economists have stated that Reagan’s policies were an important
        part of bringing about the second longest peacetime economic expansion
        in U.S. history, and followed by an even longer 1990s expansion that
        began under George H.W. Bush in 1991.[24][25]
        This economic expansion continued through the Clinton administration
        with unemployment rates steadily decreasing throughout his presidency
        (7.3% at the start of his presidency and 4.2% at the culmination, with
        the lowest rate reaching 3.9% in 2000).[26]

        • Anonymous

          In January, 1981, the inflation rate was 11.8, not over 13%.  In December, 1980, the rate was 13.5%.  Who gets credit for January?

          In November, 1974, Republican Gerald Ford was in the White House and the inflation rate was 12.3.  His predecessor, Republican Richard Nixon, had resigned in August, 1974, when faced with impeachment.  Beginning in February, 1974 and continuing for 16 months during the Nixon and Ford administrations, the inflation rate stayed above 10%.  Remember Gerald Ford’s campaign to Whip Inflation Now.  It used the initials WIN.  They even made up buttons. 

          In March 1979, Jimmy Carter was in office and the inflation rate was 10.1.  The inflation rate stayed above 10% for the last 22 months of his administration. It did not drop below 10% to stay until January, 1982, as Ronald Reagan began his second full year in office. 

          So to summarize, Republicans Nixon and Ford presided over an economy with inflation rates above 10% for 16 months.  Jimmy Carter saw inflation rates above 10% for 22 months, and Ronald Reagan saw inflation above 10% for 9 out of the first 12 months of his presidency.  It looks like inflation may be out of the hands of the President regardless of party.

  • Ole George quit the Senate because his fragile ego could not stand the ignominy of becoming the Senate Minority Leader when the Dems took their beating in ’94. 

    Pardon me if I pass on Georges political commentary.

    • Anonymous

      Now….having said that,   how was it that the Senator would have known that his party would have lost control,   and secondly,  why would it have made a difference to him,   he had previously been a minority member?      You don’t make any sense,  but pass on the Senator’s commentary.   How about what he said to Oliver North:  “Just because I disagree with your opinions and actions,  just because I disagree with this President and his policies,  doesn’t make me, or anyone else……less of a patriot than you,  nor does it make anyone less of an American than you.  Succinctly, Col. North,   it makes us all Americans.  Yet all Americans are not in front of this tribunal explaining why they broke the law.”

      If you wish to pass on the Senator’s commentary, you should place it in the proper perspective, his, not yours. Which is why the Senator is, along with the soon to be former Senator Snowe, indicating that apathy…, not party politics, not dissention, not faud…..but apathy, the simple reluctance to participate is what is weakening our political system. This reluctance has lead to polarization and caring about the unenrolled voters, and not the country.

      • Feel better? I said: “I will pass….” Never any suggestion that you should.

        George Mitchell never served as Senate Minority leader. 

        Everyone knew the Democrats would lose the Senate in ’94.

        I ALWAYS participate.

    • jdtex

      I love it.  Well said!

      • Anonymous

        Folks like you and (missed the) Mark are the exact problem “Ole George” addresses.

        •  Folks like me?  I’ve looked through my address book and have no acquaintances named “Duhbya” so how do you know what type of “folks” I am?

          Your screen-name would suggest you are a partisan/ should I address you as such?

          • Anonymous

            ” Folks like you” always seem to conjure up the long ago past when the topic is current.
            Address me any way you like, and the Duhbya reference should be quite plain……I’m dumb as a doorknob, hence the “Duh”.

    • Anonymous

      Fragile ego seems to fit the bill.  Our son was one of the students to receive the Mitchell Scholarship this year.  All of the recipients were invited to attend a dinner at Orono back in August.  My wife arrived a little late because she was coming from somewhere else.  Seneator Mitchell happened to be walking up to the building at the same time as my wife.  She, being the joker that she is, said to him, “I don’t feel so bad for being late now.”  He said nothing back, but gave her a look that would kill.  Hey man, whatever.

  • Anonymous

    “…..Everybody wants what’s best for the country,” ______________________________________

    How I wish that was true.  Obama’s version of “what is best for the country” must include transforming it into something that would make the founding fathers roll over in the graves.

    • Anonymous

      An economy that works for all, not just a few, would definitely stick in their craws.  Promoting our interests on the world stage through international cooperation instead of sending thousands of American military personnel into combat (under a phony pretext on at least one occasion in the last decade) would probably be really upsetting, too.

    • pbmann

      Romney would like to turn the US into a feudal state, like most Republicans.

      • Leaveing all of  America in a fued, while they run to Switzerland with the cash!

        • Anonymous

          Exactly as our phony governor will do, on a smaller scale…wish he’d run to Florida yesterday!

      • Anonymous

        It is not illegal or immoral to do banking in Switzerland or the Caymann Islands. Of course, to the 47% of Americans who pay no taxes (with many of them getting money back in addition to paying nothing), anyone who is successful should pay more and be ridiculed for whatever investments they have  and wherever those investments might be.

    • Look up the Act for Sick and Disabled Seamen!

      ( A Tax on Seafarers to subsidise government maritime hostpitals)

      Both Adams and Jefferson endorsed it!

      Limbaugh and Hannity wheren’t around then!

      They had nothing to do with the founding of this country and they know nothing about it!

      • Anonymous

        From Wikipedia: “An Act for the relief of sick and disabled seamen[1] was passed by the 5th Congress. It was signed by President John Adams on July 16, 1798. The Act authorized the deduction of twenty cents per month from the wages of seamen, for the sole purpose of funding medical care for sick and disabled seamen, as well as building additional hospitals for the treatment of seamen”.

        A very noble idea that should be carried forward today.

        This was NOT a tax, but instead, it was an early form of having people contribute towards their own health insurance.

        Teachers unions all over this great country, when asked to contribute part of their wages for the sole purpose of of medical care for sick and disabled teachers, (and their families) have screamed bloody murder about it.  They, and other public employee unions, want the taxpayers to pay for all of it.

        Thank-you for your startling revelation that Limbaugh and Hannity were not around in 1776.

        Perhaps if you knew a little more about the politics of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams you might realize they were of the Republican persuasion.

        You are one misinformed and misguided individual.

        • Jake_OO7

          And your source is Wikipedia.  Get off the lazy boy and off the rumps of Limbaugh and Hannity. 

        • Anonymous

          John Adams was a Federalist.  Thomas Jefferson was a Democratic-Republican.  Eventually the Republican part was dropped.  Adams and Jefferson did not agree on much, just that the other guy was a scoundrel trying to destroy the country.

          Teachers often have health insurance paid as part of their compensation, much like other workers do.  In some places, coverage is for the individual only with the teacher picking up the balance necessary for family coverage. 

          By the way, Adams’ Federalist Party was the conservative party of the day, as the Republicans of today assert themselves to be.  It is interesting that the conservatives of 1798 required citizens to purchase insurance.  Come to think of it, the conservatives of the 1990’s thought it was a good idea, too, and so did Mitt Romney as governor of Massachusetts.

        • Anonymous

           The Republican party was formed in 1854 in Jackson Michigan.  John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died on July 4th, 1826.  28 Years prior to the forming of the Republican party.  Thomas Jefferson was a member of the Democratic Republican party (the precursor to the modern Democratic party) and John Adams was a Federalist.

        • Anonymous

          If you wish to say the Jefferson & Adams were of the modern republican party, you couldn’t be more wrong. Jefferson was very suspicious of banks and big business. He was the man who promoted agriculture and the common man. The current r’ are the party of corporations and the rich. Oh, yes, they’ll throw us a crumb now and then and complain about we don’t pay taxes

        • Ben

          “This was NOT a tax, but instead, it was an early form of having people contribute towards their own health insurance.”

          So, in other words … it’s exactly the same as Obamacare’s individual mandate. Got it. 

    • Anonymous

      Mitchell’s approach sure does not resemble the current Majority leader in the Senate at all. And therein lies the problem of why the Senate has not done its job with all the bills passed by the House and has not even come up with a budget in over THREE YEARS! Harry Reid and the Democratic controlled Senate is the true “bone-in-the-throat” of progress.

    • Anonymous

      What is your problem with Obama specifically?

  • Anonymous

    Republicans urge decreased voter participation.  Why is that?

    • They want to win!

    • Anonymous

      Siiiigh. Why are you against the sanctity of the ballot, Jess?

    • I don’t, I have 75 unregistered voters that I will be taking to the polls and telling them to vote republican.  I like the idea of unregistered voters so its not a party thing.

  • Anonymous

    Note to George – SHUT UP!

    • Anonymous

      That’s so mature.

    • Anonymous

      After you …

    • Ben

      So, you’re upset that someone took you and your party to task for your loony, destructive shenanigans, and the only thing you can think of say is, “SHUT UP!”?

  • Robert Brennan

     Happy to see Sen. Mitchell take a stand against Angus King’s attempt to silence Maine’s TV stations with the threat of law suits.

  • I would vote for a Mitchell / Cohen ticket!

  • Anonymous

    Mitchell Stopped be a Mainer after his  first election, Just like Snowe who never lived in Maine or won’t live here after she retires from day one of her first election.. There should be a law that our Congressmen and Senators must live in the state they’re elected in for at least 6 months a year.

    • Anonymous

      That, is exactly right, and be accountable to the People of the State. Good post.

    • I don’t know where you get it that Senator Snowe did not live in Maine. Her and Governor Jock McKernan own a home on the coast and have lived there at that residence since 1997. Before that they lived in Biddeford. Before she and Jock married she had a residence in Auburn, Maine. How do I know this, my spouse ran her conressional and senate offices in Maine for over 20 years.  

      • Anonymous

        Agreed…I remember running into Snowe in Auburn several times while we were both grocery shopping in the 1970s. Prior to her political life, she and her first husband(who became a politician) owned and operated Snowe’s Tire in Lewiston for more than a few years.

      • Anonymous

        How many days a year do they live in Maine. Do they register their cars here, tell me more about her condo in washington or their mansion in VA and where her mail gets delivered.  besides her office in Maine.

  • Anonymous

    I can see Santorum’s point about smart people not supporting the GOP.

    • Anonymous

       the definition of smart is not college indoctrinated.

  • Anonymous

    Keep the mind, on the most fragile giant ever in history. Seek out even the most wise, and one must consent that the vote may be powerless.

    • Anonymous

      What???

      • Anonymous

        I was just saying, I am not sure the vote is enough to help the ailing U.S.

        • Anonymous

          Not with liberals joyously high fiving each other as they drive us off the financial cliff!

          • Anonymous

            Um, two wars fought “on the cuff” under Bush, unpaid for.

          • Anonymous

            Go back a few more years to the days of Ronald Reagan.  His administration was responsible for the idea that, in the words of Dick Cheney, “deficits don’t matter.”  The Clinton administration got things under control, but then came George W., the man whose name must not be said aloud.  Actions speak louder than words, and George W.’s absence from the Republican national convention spoke volumes.

  • Anonymous

    While in a leadership post in the senate, Mitchell was one of most partisan politicians who rivalled Tip O’Neil but did not have the same class.  Mitchell was appointed to the senate after he came in third to Longley in the governor’s race.  He became a legitimate candidate after he changed his voice cadence.  A true politician who still reaps the benefits of political favoritism.  He was lucky in Ireland after the economy turned and was a failure in the Middle East as a peace maker.  It is time for Mitchell to disappear from media attention.

    • RJ

      George
      Mitchell seems over-rated.  You mention his “peace” missions.  I guess one can’t be a hypocrite if one is a
      politician. He succeeded Robert Bird, an old time Dem who actually did work in
      a bipartisan fashion.  Senator Mitchell’s
      time as Senate Majority Leader was notable for his highly partisan positions, broke
      the “gentleman’s code,” which had actually worked to get things done for we the people.   Mitchell was succeeded by Tom Daschle an even
      more partisan leader.  One could say that
      Mr. Mitchell began the trend of division that engulfs us today.  Of course, he still has his sights set on the
      SCOTUS.

  • Words of wisdom from Mr Partisan democrat himself.  George Mitchell, NEVER EVER COMPROMISED.  He led the political revolution to divide America.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe it is time to return dueling. McConnell vs. Reid. How many shots until somebody was hit? Boehner vs. Pelosi, Pelosi wins. Cantor loses to anyone. Not a bad way to clean out Congress.

    • Anonymous

      I’d prefer McConnell vs. Reid, ten rounds of boxing.  Fight most likely ends with a heart attack.

      • Anonymous

        Except that Reid was in fact, a boxer.

        • Anonymous

          Yes, I know.  Maybe Mitch doesn’t.

  • jdtex

    Georgie Boy couldn’t handle the pressure, so he bailed, and now he cries, much like a current senator who decided she has had enough and might throw a tantrum. 

    • Anonymous

      Oh, bailed. Like that half-Governor from Alaska.

      Got it.

  • Anonymous

    Sounds like he still hasn’t gotten over losing a pile in a foreign investment w’ a buddy from the coast.

    http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2000/03/06/275250/index.htm

  • Anonymous

    Voter participation is not the problem, it is voter education on the issues. A recent surveys showed 35% don’t know who their state legislators are, whoo are their members of Congress, who the vice president is….  I don’t want these people voting at all.

  • Anonymous

    So glad that you can all play nice in the sand box together, to bad you wouldn’t direct your attention to helping the people of this country. If you weren’t a crook before you got elected they’ll teach you how to cheat everyone and everything you can while your in office. Insider trader information, which is illegal for average citizens, but not the elected officals of this country. What’s up with that? Money spent on windfarms that has not helped one family lower their light bill, oh, other than the yearly payments for the land use to the land owners, which isn’t near enough for the enviromental havic these have caused. Mitchell is no different than the others, he isn’t in it for the good of the people, lining pockets is more like it. Dem or Rep doesn’t matter which one your talking about.

    • Anonymous

      In my humble opinion, you are right!  Neither party is taking good care of the constituents they were elected to represent!  Many of the same “rabid dog” tactics of  attacking people with different opinions that you see here  is occurring in DC which sure doesn’t allow anything to get done! 

  • Anonymous

    “What you’re seeing around the country is a concerted effort by Republicans and their supporters to suppress voting — to discourage people from voting, which really reverses a trend that has existed in the country for more than a hundred years of trying to expand voting,” the former senator said.”

    This is such a bunch of crap. You have to show a photo ID to fly on a plane or ride a bus across country but somehow it’s suppressing voter rights to require people to produce and ID to vote.

    The Democrats required everyone to produce a photo ID to attend their own convention but decry having to do it to vote. What a bunch of hypocrites.

    • Anonymous

      BS.

      There has been a very concentrated effort by the GOP tea party people to suppress voting in this country.

      You’re entitled to your own opinion but you’re not entitled to your own facts.

  • Anonymous

    So the guy who was commonly referred to as the most partisan member of Congress during his time there takes this opportunity to bemoan “political discord” and simultaneously tar Republicans with the false accusation of trying to suppress voting.

    “What you’re seeing around the country is a concerted effort by Republicans and their supporters to suppress voting — to discourage people from voting, which really reverses a trend that has existed in the country for more than a hundred years of trying to expand voting,” the former senator said.”

    So, Dems who adhere to their political party’s views:  Good.

    Republicans who adhere to their political party’s views:  Bad.

    • Anonymous

      I would further ask why people believe requiring an id to vote is bad?  You have to have an id to cash a check, to fly on an airplane, to pick up boxes at the post office…even to fill out a request for government benefits.  How many people honestly don’t have a picture id?

  • Anonymous

    Voter Suppression – GOP Job One.

    Can’t win an election?

    Steal it.

    Yessah

    • Anonymous

      Really?  1.  Please provide a good example of the Republican Party and voter suppression.  2.  Please explain the suppression of military votes that has occurred in the last 2 election cycles (hint:  it wasn’t done by the Republican Party)  3.  Please explain ACORN and voter fraud (hint:  it wasn’t supported by the Republican Party)  

      If you have to have an id to cash a check, fly on an airplane, take a bus or train, drive a car, and apply for government assistance then please explain to me how requiring an id is causing voter suppression!?!?!?

      • Ben

        1. Republicans have passed and attempted to pass voter suppression measures in every state in America as part of a coordinated effort to disenfranchise the poor, minorities, students and the elderly since coming to power in 2010. 

        For a “good example of the Republican Party and voter suppression,” one need look no further than the infamous voter ID law which was passed by the Maine GOP and then repealed by voters in a referendum last year. 

        11 states have passed voter ID laws since 2010. Many of these states have also passed laws that scale back early voting periods, eliminate early voting hours and restrict voter registration drives – which all typically benefit Democratic candidates – or that stop allowing people to register to vote on Election Day, a practice which added tens of thousands of new voters in 2008, most of whom voted for President Obama.

        Then there have been several state-level GOP officers and legislators who openly admit that these laws are meant to keep blacks away from the polls and to benefit Republican candidates. http://www.thenation.com/blog/169454/ohio-gop-admits-early-voting-cutbacks-are-racially-motivated

        2. I’m aware of many false rightwing accusations of suppression of military votes, but I’m not aware of any actual instances of that occurring. 

        3. ACORN was never involved in any voter fraud.

        • Anonymous

          I will ask my question again since what you gave me didn’t tell me how requiring an id card is suppressing the vote.  And just so you know, I am military and 120,000 military members never received the ballots they requested in the 2010 election cycle.   I will also have to disagree with you on the ACORN voter fraud.  A quick google brought up at least 1 conviction (in Nevada) and if I spent a little more time I’m sure I could find the case numbers and convictions of other ACORN voter fraud.

  • Robert Brennan
    • Anonymous

      Well, well, well.

      Wonder if Governor Oily will demand the DC remove the story? 

      Must be getting exhausting trying to stop up all those holes in the dike.

  • Anonymous

    Seems like the pot calling the kettle black by the former Senator from Maine…

  • Anonymous

    Smith, Muskie, Mitchell, Cohen – how far Mainers’  fortunes have fallen since they left their places in the US Senate. What’s more, there’s little chance for a reversal of that fall. I fear we’ve become a backwater state offering backwater candidates to contribute to that body.

  • Anonymous

    It is we who elect the politicians we later criticize.  And, it is we who tolerate the political acrimony and resulting gridlock.  What would happen if the political parties began working together for the good of the people? I believe it was author, Walt Kelly who said, “We have met the enemy, and he is US!”

    • Anonymous

      “…the single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president.” – Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.  How does that sound with regard to the Republicans’ willingness to work together?

  • Anonymous

    A vote for the democrats is a vote for u.s division and strengthen the brotherhood .

    • Anonymous

      How elegantly stated. Truly prescient to a tea.

  • Anonymous

    Interesting that Dems scream of incivility most often when the winds are shifting against their way…Good to see old George is still alive, if not relevant.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t see Cynthia Dill mentioned once in this article.  I’m so impressed by George Mitchell’s support for her.   It’s just overwhelming–just oozing out everywhere at every opportunity.  Or maybe this reporter just  isn’t aware there is a Democratic Party Senatorial candidate in the State of Maine during this election.

  • Anonymous

    Typical liberal Democrat response–

    • Anonymous

      Truly a most artful and considered response!

  • Anonymous

     “What you’re seeing around the country is a concerted effort by
    Republicans and their supporters to suppress voting — to discourage
    people from voting, which really reverses a trend that has existed in
    the country for more than a hundred years of trying to expand voting,”
    the former senator said. Senator could/would you explain what exactly that comment meant ie an example of the accusation.  I assume he may be referring to voter ID.  I don’t see how producing an ID before casting a vote that may effect the country is so horrifying, unless a large portion your voting base is maybe questionable.  As opposed to a state authorizing millions of dollars of overtime to process the mailed out absentee ballots to illegals, welfare recep. ect ect, but thats OK right?  That’s what Massachusetts is doing.   Wake up. 

    • Anonymous

      And many states where id’s are being required have a free state provided id card that they are notifying registered voters about prior to the election day.  Besides if you don’t have an id how do you cash a check, get a bank account, drive, take a plane/train/bus, get social security, work and/or apply for government assistance?

  • Anonymous

    The information on unemployment came from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  And I was wrong.  The unemployment rate was 10.8, not 10.4, in November and December, 1982.  Reagan had been in office for 22 months. 

    I looked into interest rates, too.  I found the 30-year fixed mortgage rates from Freddie Mac.  In January, 1981, when Reagan took office the rate was 14.90.  The average for 1982, Reagan’s second year in office, was 16.04.  For 1983, Reagan’s third year it was still 13.24, and for 1984 it was 13.88.  That would have been Reagan’s fourth year.  The average for 1988, Reagan’s last year, the rate was 10.34. 

    Gasoline prices in 1979 dollars tells an interesting story.  During the Carter administration, gasoline prices were $2.83 in July, 1979, $3.50 in July, 1980.  In January, 1981, when Reagan took over, it was $3.73.  In January, 1982, $3.43, and in January, 1983, $3.31.  By January, 1985, the beginning of Reagan’s second term, gas was $2.52.  In January, 2001, when Bush took over, gas was $1.56.  By September, 2005, it had risen to $3.67, and in July, 2008, still under Bush, the price was $4.71. 

    Jimmy Carter graduated from the Naval Academy and trained for nuclear submarines under Admiral Hyman Rickover.  That strikes me as being kind of demanding.  I am certain that it is more than I could have done.  After leaving the Navy, Carter built a successful business as a peanut farmer.  I know peanuts might seem kind of trivial, but no more so than, say, sporting goods or office supplies.  And peanut butter is very good combined with chocolate as we all know.

    Ronald Reagan graduated from Eureka College after studying economics and sociology.  In other words, liberal arts.  I know I could have handled that because I did.  Then, of course, he had a successful career as an actor, starring in among other films, Bedtime for Bonzo.  He also was host for Death Valley Days.  His military service in World War II consisted mostly of assignment to the First Motion Picture Unit in Culver City, California, making propaganda and training films.   

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