Comments for: State investigating death of Bangor man who was reportedly shocked with a stun gun by police

Posted Sept. 20, 2012, at 7:21 p.m.

BANGOR | A local man with a history of mental illness and drug use was reportedly shocked with a stun gun by a police officer last week and later died at Eastern Maine Medical Center after having two heart attacks, his parents said this week. The Maine attorney general’s …

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  • Anonymous

    xxx

    • What’s the alternative?  Shooting them?  Beating them with a billy-club?   When faced with an unruly subject, the police have to respond somehow.  It’s not like they can leave a note asking the person to call them back when they calm down and then just drive away.
       Not enough information in the story to judge if the taser was called for, and I won’t judge anyway because I wasn’t there.  But given your statement that the device should be outlawed, please inform us all what you think the police should have done.

      • Anonymous

        “please inform us all what you think the police should have done.”
        Maybe not have killed him.

        • Anonymous

          Very few police officers ever want to use any weapon. I seriously doubt any one really dedicated to protecting ever wants to kill someone and would only do so if their own lives are threatened and some not even then.

          Tasers are less deadly than using a gun. Their guns should only be used for defense of an armed subjected. The Taser, in my opinion, should only be used in lieu of the gun for defense to a subject not armed with a deadly weapon. Rather than using a Taser for a disorderly person who cannot or will not submit to the officer, officers should have adequate backup to take a subject into custody.  Unfortunately, with more and more municipal budget cuts, there will be fewer officers available for such calls and more individual officers will be forced to defend themselves.

          I do think the Taser is a good tool, but I think more study needs to be done, and officers need more guidelines on their use. Personally, I do not see the Taser as a good choice for getting a drunk or drugged subject to comply, but I do see it as better than having to use a gun. 

          Officers need more and better training and maybe better tools for restraining a subject in the instance McCue found himself in. I would hope, too, that the hospital, investigates why, if they had contact info, the family wasn’t called. I worked in an ER for years, and we made every effort to reach out to the families of an unconscious or deceased patient. That was prior to HIPPA, but we were always discrete, until we had a family member present at the hospital so it can be done. Sadly we had some deceased accident victims with no ID and no way to know who they were and then the ME was responsible for ID’ing them and making the appropriate notifications. 

          Again, my condolences to his family and friends. May he rest in peace.

          • Anonymous

            xxx

          • Anonymous

            Why do you think the Taser’s cartridges have serial numbers on them? How do you know that a review is not conducted post use?

          • Anonymous

            xxx

          • Anonymous

            A Taser is classified as less then lethal force. To the best of my knowledge each and every use of a Taser IS reviewed for justification.

          • Tom Brown III

             taser cartridges also have a few dozen confitti like tags that fly out of them with serial #s on them . Tasers also have USB jack to see when, where, and how long they were used for. Once contacted one cartridge can provide multiple jolts into the same subject and this is also recorded in the taser.

          • Anonymous

            Thank you…I forgot about that.

          • Why are all your comments edited to just read “xxx” – if you had/chose to delete them and/or replace them, why write them in the first place?  It does nothing but confuse those of us reading comments after you have already done your editing…..

          • Tom Brown III

             well nice to see another person misinformed about the issue at hand. do a google search on Taser. The research is there. It has been deployed over a million times in training and another half a million in actual incidents and there are no direct link deaths to it. Some of this has to do with massive police unions behind the product and Tasers legal team but even if the 600 cases of Taser related dealths… to 1.5 million taser deployments the results are clear.

            Taser is a great tool. Non-compliant subjects often escalate to violence quickly as adrenaline builds up. The taser allows an officer to avoid a violent wrestling match and subdue and detain the subject quickly with relitively small injuries. The most dangerous thing about being tased is the NMI lockup and falling. A typicall 200 ib adult 6’0” can sustain broken bones and dislocated joints just from falling from a standing position especially if they are already in motion.

          • Anonymous

            600 deaths does not make this a great tool if you are one of those who died or one of your love ones died as a result. Perhaps you need to watch a few videos of people being tased by supposed law enforcement officers who were more agitated than their victims. Try it then come back to me regarding use of tasers. Think of that 77 year old woman who was somewhat sassy to a cop who then pulled her out of her 4×4 to the ground and was rough with her. He needed to diffuse the situation before reaching in there and dragging her out. Officers take a lot—everyone working in law enforcement has moments that they lose it. Losing it in this case in Bangor may have caused a death. You keep right on defending, but know that many of us disagree. Attitude of law enforcement coming into a situation can make or break that incident. Some officers have a bad attitude even before they assert their position over the person—that makes for a very bad scene for everyone involved. Say all you want about tasers, but I personally watched several videos and came away with a bad taste for some officers and their arrogance and feelings of superiority where some of the arrests were concerned. Tasing does not belong in Bangor, ME, or anywhere else. Many who have worked with the public have put up with a lot of attitude and don’t get to pull a taser or a gun—If someone’s life was at stake, then lethal force is indicated. According to information already given, that was truly not the case. I also know that his behavior may have been described as “hollering” and I will even believe that it could have been quite a scene. But, the protocol when no one’s life is in danger is not to haul out your taser.

          • Tom Brown III

             ok well I have been tasered and drive stunned and maced. I was a non-compliant subject in a live fire demo for x26 taser in NH. There is no evidence yet the taser caused his death stop speculating.

            I agree there are bad cops out there, with a chip on their shoulder and who are a disgrace to the job. I have seen the video of that guy hauling the old lady out of the car it was despicable taser or no taser I believe he was reprimanded. I obviously don’t think the taser is a cure all or anything goes tool it needs to be pretty far down on a departments force continuum after strong verbal command and light hand force.

            As far as this incident goes there is no evidence yet of what happened. Bangor PD has a very reputable department and with everything that has been going on lately with these drug addled rejects they aren’t taking any chances. The taser is used to gain compliance with unruly and escalating individuals. A sane clear headed person will most likely comply with simple police instructions and it stops there. But violent, enraged, doped up subjects wont, and I am just assuming because you only cite youtube videos you have never wrestled with a 250ib guy on PCP once they esclate the only thing stopping them is an extreme violent force, the taser will incapacitate them quickly and allow you to restrain them before they run out into traffic to punch a mack truck in the face.

            But I am glad you chimed in with your armchair opinions on youtube videos.

          • Anonymous

            And, you assume that I am chiming in with armchair opinions. How little you know about any poster on the BDN commentary. Yup, your excuse is to not need to wrestle them down and how great it is to stop them from trying to punch a Mack truck in the grill. Sarcasm is not becoming to you. Do not make assumptions of what I have seen and have experienced and I won’t call you out on this one. Note how your are having a problem without becoming sarcastic and condescending. How did that taser feel? And, there is no way you could know if the heart would be affected unless you had a clean bill of health. Even a punch in the chest at certain parts of the heart beat will stop a heart. Electric shock has an affect similar to that punch in the chest. Someone’s son is dead whether or not the taser is the cause, we do know that tasers have cost people their lives. You completely ignore protocols long in place before the taser. By the way, what were the protocols in place before the taser for an out of control person on the street? Do you know or would you be guessing. If I needed to use a taser, I would get another job.

          • Tom Brown III

            I was not directly involved with law enforcement before taser. call me out on whatever you want. I am not some anonymous poster I don’t hide behind nickname pertaining to a vice. The taser hurt like hell for 5 seconds and I thought I was gunna crap myself. 5 minutes later I was back on my feet drinkin coffee though I felt like I had just done a few dozen pushups. 

            However during my time with the SO in NH I talked alot with my dad about the difference between law enforcement in 2007 and 1990. I believe you will see in one of my comments somewhere a quip about a maglite being used as a ranged ltl weapon… if you had a suspect wanted for a violent crime like beating his wife you found a way to stop him. A steel tube filled with 5 d cell batteries to the small of the back from 20 feet typically was effective… 

            The protocols were very similary they used a force continum which I have mentioned several times and I will describe to you now as it pertains to gaining control and compliance:

            1. Verbal commands polite courteous first time then elevate to abrupt and loud

            2. light physical “hand force” a hand on shoulder, waist, arm, hand with maybe light pressure applied in joint locks (like when someone twists your thumb back)

            3. OC/Mace/Pepperspray to mouth and face, at this point its usually “game on”

            3b Taser now before 98/99 before tasers were being deployed you would skip this step

            4  Heavy physcial force, martial arts, joint locks, tackle, hand to hand combat

            5 ASP batton/night stick (4 and 5 typically are interchangeable but at the RockSO it went like this)
            targeting major muscle groups chest muscles, buttocks/thigh to create nerve shock and severe instant pain.

            6 LTL devices such as flashbang rubber bullets, bean bag rounds, Stinger grenades
            These devices can cause serious physical harm and unlike taser have very many documented cases of permanent sustained injuries.  

            7. Lethal force. 

            there you go like it or not but most cops abide by something similar to this. different departments and states vary and deviate but this is close. 

            Also your are? think you were going for you are or the oh so confusing you’re. 

          • Anonymous

            The C in call should be capitalized.
            gunna–very poor grammar–I thought I would crap my pants
            drinkin—do you mean drinking and if you want to lose the G, you replace it with an apostrophe
            alot is two words—a lot
            subordinate clauses should be separated with a comma I
            Is “simalary” your misspelling of the word, similarly?

            Listen, I could finish correcting your sloppy grammar and spelling, but I choose not to do so, but only point out that you are not some kind of genius.  My one error in my piece hardly comes close to how poorly you write. Learn to write. Then get back to me with something better than your defensive rant.

            This young man, if he died due to the taser, did not deserve the treatment he received. You know it, as does everyone else. Someday you will realize that use of the taser is worse than the flashlight loaded with the D cells—which I personally never saw used. You can’t seem to wrap your brain around the fact that other methods used first usually result in a much better outcome. If you chose to be tasered, so be it. This young man did not consciously choose his punishment with the taser. It was a hand dealt to him.

            Outlaw the use of tasers. 

          • Tom Brown III

             I am not writing a college essay so I write with colloquial grammar to help further atmosphere of the story. I have never been a very good spella’ nor claimed to be a genius. However, I meant to write similar not similarly sorry I was writing in haste and didn’t proof read my comment!

            The only one ranting defensively here is you. After all you asked me what the differences in protocols were and I gave you a relevant story pertaining to the force continuum and how the taser now fits into it. I have my mind wrapped firmly around the concept of force and generally whenever police have to use any kind of force over verbal communication the results are not good especially for the subject. I would love to see every interaction between the police and public end peaceably and without violence.

            If you think getting tased for 5 seconds is worse then get a 5 cell mag-lite ( basically a 9lb solid metal projectile) heaved into your back then I would challenge you to try both.

            Furthermore people resiting arrest or who are non-compliant with the police obviously don’t want to be tased but they made a conscious choice somewhere (drugs/alcohol) that led to that incident, with exception of course, which in this case if he was having problems with mental illness then yes maybe he was a victim of very poor circumstance and never made a choice which led to his tasing. Still, if that was the case and he was having a psychotic break and had lost the connection to reality and ability to make good decisions the police were protecting him, themselves, and public from possible erratic and dangerous behaviors.

          • Anonymous

            You brought spelling into your argument, then you take it off the table with an excuse. Make up your mind.  Seems to me that your critical eye is fine but when applied to you, you just can’t take it.

            I challenge you to check out the most recent research (2012) regarding the safety of the taser.

            The police protected this young man right to the grave. Why was there no arrest record? Why did he get hauled to a hospital? He was unruly enough to be tased which would not be done until they advised him he was under arrest regardless of whether or not he understood that he was being arrested.  But, the arrest was never made after the taser was used. Isn’t that convenient for the non-arresting officers. Yes, Tom, I wrote “non-arresting” because they were not “arresting officers” since the man was not under arrest. Please do not attempt to provide answers, allow the Bangor Police Department to conclude an investigation and make the report public.

            Consider the possibility that you are not an expert and your opinion is not necessarily better than the opinions of others.

            You can reply if you choose, but I will not be reading your reply. Obviously, you can see nothing wrong in tasing even when it is not safe and some places are discontinuing their use right here in the USA. Overzealous law enforcement is using the taser too often in circumstances which do not warrant a taser. Tragedies/deaths have occurred.

          • Tom Brown III

             You don’t have to be placed under arrest and have your Myranda rights stated before police use force. Typically force is required when a subject is not being compliant and resisting arrest. You are correct we don’t want to speculate too much until the investigations are done and reports released I am just providing a macro view point on use of LTL force.

            I am not offended that you corrected my grammar/spelling I was in the wrong to point out your mistake when I clearly inferred its meaning, my bad sorry I was just kidding around and just wanted to make light in what was becoming/became a fairly heated exchange.

            I encourage you to take your own advice and look at research on it.

            “Based on the available evidence, and on accepted criteria for defining product risk vs.
            efficacy, we believe that when stun technology is appropriately applied, it is relatively safe
            and clearly effective. The only known field data that are available suggest that the odds are,
            at worst, one in one thousand that a stun device would contribute to (and this does not
            imply “cause”) death. This figure is likely not different than the odds of death when stun
            devices are not used, but when other multiple force measures are. A more defensible figure
            is one in one hundred thousand.”

            taken from
            http://www.securitymanagement.com/archive/library/stungun0605.pdf

            test done on pigs don’t apply to humans
            http://www.canadianmedicaljournal.ca/content/179/7/677.2.short

            here is actually a good informational read (though somewhat dated) and does bring to light the fact that the taser company is reluctant to admit the taser is 100% safe. Just so there is no confusion I haven’t been arguing that. Like all LTL technologies it has risks. Tasers do not kill instantly or indiscriminately like a firearm would but there are some risks for people on drugs/booze or maybe certain cardiac problems.

            http://www.charlydmiller.com/LIB08/2004JulyAZRepublicTaserSafetyQuestioned.pdf

          • Anonymous

            I do believe the Taser is a great tool. However, I do believe that it is misused on many occasions. I have not, and am not stating that was the case here, because there are no hard facts available. If Mr. McCue was, in fact, on bath salts, I would venture that its use was appropriate. For this case, those facts remain to be seen.

            I have seen a news clip where an officer Tased a handcuffed woman, already seated on the ground because she was taunting him. In my opinion, that was inappropriate on every level, especially since there have been Taser related deaths. I have many friends in law enforcement and I would be devastated if one were hurt or killed in the line of duty. But on the flip side, if a family member of loved one of mine died because of a Taser, that was used in poor judgement, I would be even more devastated and angry. There are other examples, that is the one that comes to mind, just of the top of my head. People who are non-compliant are probably intoxicated, on drugs, or have other issues. Most people know better than to try and fight with an officer. 

            I do get that the Taser has its place in an officer’s arsenal, but like the firearm, it should be employed judiciously and I still stand by my post that officers need more and better training in restraining subjects, need more available back-up in a timely manner, and better policies and training on when to use the Taser and more importantly, when NOT to. Citizens do want to see other citizens dying as a result of an officer’s use of force. Used properly, there would be fewer than 600 Taser related deaths, and there would be no need for a citizen outcry.

          • Tom Brown III

             there are no taser confirmed taser caused death. there a 600 “related” cases where a taser was involved buy there isnt a causel link between the taser and death.

          • Anonymous

            600 deaths is a lot of deaths to surround the use of one tool. Even if the Taser was not the actual cause of death. For example, someone like me, who has a heart condition that involves coronary artery spasms. I would bet if I were Tased, I would have a problem, because of the stress of being Tased and maybe the overall situation. If I were to die, I am sure my death certificate would read cardiac arrest secondary to MI, related to known heart problem. But it could be that none of these events would take place without the use of the Taser.  So while the Taser would not be the cause of death, it is possible that its use has a direct bearing.

            For right now, because there are no “confirmed” deaths or even definitive causal link, doesn’t really mean that one does not exist, simply that no one has been able to fully explain the phenomenon of why 600 people, some of whom were clearly healthy, died after deployment of the Taser. 

            For me, until some or all of those deaths have been proven to be unrelated to the use of the Taser, I believe ALL officers should be more judicious in its use. I think most already are.

        • Anonymous

          Well…. I am glad you know this whole story. I was thinking the cause of death was not determined…..I guess I will have to read that again.

        • How do you know the taser used (which is speculation, to a certain extent at this point…) caused his death?  Also, if the police did feel the need to use a taser, how were they to know that there may be underlying extenuating circumstances (such as drug use or a weakened heart due to past drug use) that would cause a shock from a taser to be more deadly than “normal”?  Just a couple thoughts….

      • Anonymous

        xxx

        • Anonymous

          First, police officers that carry Tasers have to be Tasered themselves as part of the training.

          Second, all Taser cartridges (the part that has the barbs and wires) carry unique serial numbers that are recorded.

          Third, please list three or four other “methods” that could be used in place of Tasers.

          • Anonymous

            As I said, Tasers should be reviewed like any other deadly weapon. Your second point allows for that. I would suggest the 3 or 4 non-lethal methods that were in effect prior to the introduction of the Taser.

          • Anonymous

            I agree; slap-jacks, billy clubs, and “D” cell mag lights worked great for years.

          • Tom Brown III

             my dad was a deputy for penobscot back in the day and the 5 cell maglite was a pretty common LTL “ranged” weapon haha.

          • Anonymous

            Hmmm so you either cannot or do not want to provide examples of “3 or 4 non-lethal methods”. That’s OK because I will list the for you and describe how they can be lethal.

            Billy clubs, night sticks, impact weapons, etc….all considered non-lethal but if the device is used in an incorrect manner will not only injure but kill people.

            Choke holds, pepper spray, pepper balls, etc…all have killed people by restricting oxygen to the brain and in the case of the pepper ball actually killed an innocent bystander when the pepper ball penetrated the eye and struck the brain.

            Slap-jacks, brass knuckles, saps, lead knuckle gloves, etc…like other impact weapons have been know to seriously injure and kill suspects.

            There is no such thing as “non-lethal” because when you are attempting
            to take a person into custody when they don’t wish to be taken into
            custody even “non-lethal” devices can became lethal.

            But aren’t we getting ahead of ourselves? We don’t even know if the Taser had anything to do with the mans death.

          • Anonymous

            Points taken on the potential lethality of non-lethal weapons and the unkown cause of this man’s death. You have me stymied on what to use instead. I erased some of my earlier posts as a result. The potential for abuse of Tasers, like any force, is still troubling.

          • Tom Brown III

             they are much harder to abuse because they are monitored regularly. They plug into a USB charging dock just like an ipod. A night stick doesn’t.

            The best offense is a good vocabulary and being able to talk to people and play a good game of verbal judo.  If you can keep someone calm and keep the interaction professional and respectful both parties tend to walk away from the encounter with no injuries. However people on drugs seldom remain calm and compliant. 

          • Anonymous

             we don’t know if that poor boy was on drugs or not! please the family may read this.

          • Tom Brown III

            we will find out soon enough I think and my money is on the dope.

          • Anonymous

            What were they???? It is kind of obvious that they didn’t work or they would still be using them! DUH!

          • Anonymous

            First, #1 is absolutely false. Police officers DO NOT have to be tasered to carry one. Please provide evidence that suggests otherwise. Actually, forget it, you will never find it. NEVER! 

            Geez JD, I thought your comments were pretty researched and thought out intil this past one.

          • Anonymous

            Well then I guess the videos I have seen from various departments of the training conducted were fake. Maybe it is a department to department training thing. In fact one local department had a video where officers were tazed in front of the department and caught by fire personnel. I trust what I saw with my own eyes.

          • Anonymous

            Well friend, I had you as someone that did more research before making such an absurd comment. Let me clarify for you champ.

            Police officers can, meaning voluntarily, elect to be subjected to a laser shock if their union allows them to do so. It will be at a weaker voltage then what would be used in the field. Most departments require a current physcial and waiver before such action can occur.

          • Anonymous

            Well champ, Let me clarify something for you. Voltage does not kill. Amperage kills. The comment was based on personal observation including local departments.

          • Anonymous

            lololol. Sorry buddy, I’m not an electrician. LOLOLOLOL. I needed a good laugh.

          • Tom Brown III

             any high school sophomore who takes physics knows the difference between voltage and amperage.

            You obviously are the one lacking in research. During Taser training you are hit with the same 50kv charge that subjects are. This is delivered @ 2.1mA though I believe the actual RMS is closer to 150 amps at a short pulsed high frequency waveform.

            During our taser training deputies took the full ride which I believe is 15 seconds (contrary to the article stating 5) but maybe thats right its been 5 years since I did the x26 training. The taser is not capable of producing a lower voltage, lower amperage charge, at least not easily by the end user. I believe it can produce a 5 second charge for training purposes if I remember correctly…

            The civilian model c-20 actually has a 30 second cycle at a higher frequency longer pulse. I have heard those are worse then the police version, whereas not quite a shock to your system its twice as long if the probs seperate and NMI occurs.

          • Tom Brown III

             Rockingham County NH sheriffs deputies were required unless they had a health defect precluding them from that part of training.

            Jd2008jd it is a department to department thing, no law requiring it.

            Though many CMJ still have cadets get OC’d and run a course because if you deploy OC spray in a tussle its gunna git on ya.

          • Anonymous

            Why would anyone bother reading point 2 and 3 when “first” is so absurd. LOL.

            Before tasers did all police officers have to be shot with a .40 so they knew what that experience was like. LOLOLOLOLOLL.

          • Anonymous

            Google Second Chance Ballistic Vests videos

          • Tom Brown III

             I met that guy once he want around shooting himself with a .357 right? friggin great stuff.

            But once again bushfan justa a trollin like a pro.

        • Anonymous

          cars have killed people too.  let’s outlaw them as well.  oh, and ladders…people fall off ladders and die ALL the time.  get rid of em.  my neighbor fell in her bathtub the other day and cracked her head open.  back to “showering” in the river like they did in the 1800’s.  some of you mushy, baby soft, wimpy people are really, truly unbelievable in your spinelessness.

      • Anonymous

        Call for back up. Attempt to settle the situation without the threats and anger regardless of the person’s antagonistic attitude/belligerence. If one cannot calm the situation to proceed with the  arrest and cuffing, then subdue the person with force of two officers or more if necessary without resorting to abuse. The way it was done before tasers.

        Tasers are “iffy” and are a form of torture. Watch the films of people who are tasered. Often it is not one shock administered, but a series. Only the officer doing the tasering, in this case, knows how many times the victim was tasered.

        Sometimes after a difficult day an officer just might be somewhat angry and needs the back up to settle the situation down. Hollering outside a fire station indicates that the victim may have been taking drugs or perhaps his mental state was not norman. Whatever happened most of us will never know.

        Stop the tasering—it is a lot more dangerous for some than others and no police officer responding to a scene can evaluate someone’s medical condition.

        • Anonymous

          Police shouldn’t have to get into hand to hand combat with people to get them to comply.

          They have families to go home to also.

          Tasers are used to keep the subject and the officer safe.

          • Anonymous

            It is a part of their job. If people complied with everything, why would we even need police officers also know as law enforcement. The title gives the job description. Five to one supposedly was the ratio of police to this one unruly/disorderly person. Outlaw the taser. If any citizen tasered a police officer who was being antagonistic towards person, and officers have been known to over-step, the citizen would be in the slammer charged with assault with a deadly weapon. The company manufacturing the tasers makes law officers believe they are great and uses propaganda like it saves lives. In this case, it did not save a life! I support law officers, but will never support their use of tasers. Since the very first recorded incident of a taser on a citizen filmed by the dash board camera, I knew the use was torture. Better means are available. Talking them down with help from other officers or counselors is important. In that first video, I noted that the victim was not tazed once, but several times. During tazing, the person contorts violently and the officers keep on tazing. Perhaps, if this is so safe, then every officer who wants to carry one should also be tazed a couple of times first, then they may be reluctant to do it to someone who does not deserve that kind of torture. If they would not have pulled their service weapon on this man to shoot him, then why did they haul out the taser gun? 

          • Tom Brown III

             enlighten us to the better means please?

            The fact you don’t understand the difference between the use of lethal force (service weapon) and subduing a violent unarmed subject (taser,OC,stick,etc.) makes me think I am pissin in the wind tryin to explain this to you.

            Taser is LTL. It is not to be used in a situation calling for deadly force, I.E. a suspect with a firearm pointed/shooting at you.

            Now however here is the gray area. Deadly force isn’t authorized unless there is deadly intent on part of the subject, which may not become evident until your are incapacitated i.e. it is a catch 22.

            You tell a subject who is larger and stronger then you to get on the ground, they don’t comply, you persist, they start swinging or make an aggressive movement toward you. At this point if you have been assaulted by a larger or stronger or potentially drug enraged subject there is disparity of force and deadly force becomes authorized. If a taser is used after the first failed attempted to gain compliance the use of force continuum stops at the taser and everyone lives.

          • Anonymous

            I have enlightened you, but in your own words, explaining to you is like pissin’ in the wind. You have an opinion. The officers involved should follow usual protocol. If there were five officers, the victim could have been subdued. Give me a break. Five to one and we still need to pull the taser. Do me a favor and do not explain its use again-I know all about it. No, it is not used in a situation which calls for a split second determination that life is in danger—but officers don’t draw weapons unless absolutely unavoidable. A weapon like a taser causing 600 deaths is not exactly a toy to be used indiscriminately. I don’t want law enforcement to put their lives on the line, but this is not that kind of situation. Call back up which the officer did. Try to talk him down which is not easy when someone is either experiencing a psychotic episode or on drugs, including alcohol. Bring in someone who can act as the mediator/counselor. When nothing works, with a 5:1 ratio, then subdue and cuff. What is it that is so difficult to understand about protocol? Ban tasers and go back ten years. Too many videos have surfaced since Rodney King for the citizens to believe that some of the time the law enforcement officers are not more out of control than the person being arrested. Too many cases are in court and this will probably end up in the courts. Would you want to live the rest of your life knowing you used the taser and cost someone his life? People with a conscience would not want to be in this position knowing they took someone’s life, especially someone with a history of mental illness. Attitude is everything when it comes to law enforcement. Arrogance has no place—

          • Tom Brown III

             ok so 5 dudes tackle him to the pavement and drive his head into the ground breaking his neck crushing his airway punctering a lung with broken ribs? sounds like a good plan.

            If the guy is exhibiting signs of delusional behavior you don’t wanna get in arms reach of him. He didn’t comply the officers took no chance and subdued him from a safe distance.

            Yes its sad if he had a mental illness and that was what was affecting him but its a catch 22. and until we know the details I don’t want to speculate much more than that.

            excessive heavy physical force is far more dangerous for officers and subjects then the taser and tends to be much lower on the force continuum.

          • Anonymous

            ratio 5:1 and you believe they would just all tackle this man driving him to the ground. You must be kidding yourself but you are not fooling me with such a scenario. I have seen large crowds handled better by fewer police officers. Bumps and bruises but no broken necks–you are reaching far out on this one. Don’t bother with a reply, I don’t want to hear any more of the BS you are shoveling out to those who have never witnessed apprehension. Cops get a bad reputation for some of what their fellow officers do and making excuses is part of the problem. No one intended the outcome–but it could have been avoided. Tasers do not belong in Bangor or anywhere else. Of course, the developers and sales force wants to put them out there as the best thing going.

        • Tom Brown III

           not true not true. Tasers hurt but the pain is over within several minutes of being hit. Not torture. It isnt like rambo being hung up on a mattress spring and a car battery lol.

          As far as only the officer knowing how many times someone is hit… wrong again. It has a USB interface which is tamper proof. It can be plugged into the AG’s laptop and boom there is your evidence of use.

          You are right that a police officer can’t evaluate someones medical condition however, if someone is acting crazy and flying off the handle and pose a clear danger to themselves and public at large what do you suggest we do? In my dad’s day officers had limited choices which usually were mace followed by a physical confrontation with a blind person covered in stuff that will make you blind.

          The taser I guess is the best of a bad situation. They reduce officer and subject injuries by 75% when used. The trade off it can be potentially dangerous to people with certain health conditions but even then that isnt always a given. Like JD200jd said any less than lethal technology is more of a less lethal tool. in a fight when adrenaline is pumping hearts are racing the human body is redlining and if you have ever redlined a car you know components are much more likely to fail.

      • Anonymous

        Bully club is better than a taser.  At least he would have only had a few bruises when he piped down.

        • Anonymous

          Spoken like someone who has never had to use an “impact” weapon in real life.

          • Anonymous

            No I haven’t had to use an impact weapon.  But, I do have one in my car and house and would use if necessary.

          • Anonymous

            And you will likely severely injure or kill someone by using them improperly.

          • Tom Brown III

            I believe keeping a club in your car like that is illegal in maine as well as foolish because it is only effective if you have a strength and/or skill advantage over your attacker.

          • Anonymous

            I do believe you are correct on your first point and spot on on your second point.

      • Henderson bobby

        What happened to pepper spray? Mace?

        • Anonymous

          Mace has no affect on people under the influence of certain drugs.

          Pepper spray while effective also affects the officers that use it, bystanders, etc…and has been know to trigger asthma attacks, difficulty breathing, etc…in suspects, officers and bystanders.

        • Anonymous

          Who says that mace wasn’t tried before the taser in this case?

          • Tom Brown III

             this is true chemical mace which has pretty much been replaced by OC (synthetic pepper spray) is typically level to or before tasers in a force continuum.

  • Anonymous

    It’s time to outlaw tasers. This story stinks. So sorry for the loss of your son Mr. and Mrs. McCue.

    • Anonymous

      So what technique of non  lethal force would meet the approval of the Nanny society that law enforcement can use to properly restrain and apprehend a recalcitrant individual to ensure the non complying individual and the LEO doesn’t get hurt or killed?

      • Anonymous

        That’s a problem for law enforcement to figure out. “To protect and to serve.”

        • Anonymous

          So your intelligent enough to condemn their current practices, but not intelligent enough to tell them what is acceptable?  Or do you care at all what the LEO’s have to do to carry out their responsibility? You are charging them to “protect and to serve” but you aren’t indicating to them how they can do it.

          • Anonymous

            assuming the taser actually had anything to do with his death in the first place…which hasn’t been proven…i’m ok with one person dying once in a while relative to all the death, destruction, and injury to innocent people that have been prevented because of tasers.  small price to pay.  im sure someone will say that i’d feel differently if it were someone in my family, but the reality is, nobody in my family will ever find themselves in a situation where they are doing something that stupid.  

          • Anonymous

             I’d knock wood if I were you.

          • Anonymous

            Maybe some of us are not so worried about being tased by the police since we don’t misbehave in public.

          • Anonymous

             Wow.

          • Anonymous

            perhaps you should be when you start looking at all the evidence of police over reaction in situations-  people seem to forget , that the police are supposed to be working for the citizens and should be responsible to them

          • Guest

            It can happen to anyone. People and their bulletproof mentality is hilarious.

          • Anonymous

            this “misbehavior” as you call it by a mentally ill person is not willful…it is a manifestation of the illness….perhaps in your world all the mentally ill should be kept behind closed doors…people like you need to educate yourselves about mental illness….it is a real part of our society and law enforcement and medical workers in Maine need to learn how to handle people with this diagnosis….a diabetic can exhibit some very out of control behaviors when their sugar is out of whack….so can an elderly person whose body chemicals are out of whack….how does one justify tasering them?  Maine is a nightmare for the mentally ill and as someone who has been  victimized by law enforcement AND medical workers in the Bangor area I know what I am talking about.  Ten to one this was abuse and the reason EMMC didn’t notify anyone was because they were helping with the cover-up.  As a victim of two of those I again know what I am talking about……

            addendum…I use the word victim here but that is the wrong label…it is too weak….I am not weak because of what happened to me…. I survived it….am still surviving it…. I am a survivor of political abuse……

          • Tom Brown III

             manifestation of bath salts…

          • Anonymous

            like all close minded people you are going to be right no matter what the truth….let’s just hope you find yourself on the other end of the spectrum some time soon Tom….unless of course you are privy to some info that the rest of us don’t have….maybe you provided the salts (for a price of course)….in that case march yourself down to the police station and turn yourself in….you are party to murder……

          • Tom Brown III

             wtf r u talking about lol?! yes I go around pedling bath salts after my 60 hour work week. chill out.

          • Anonymous

             I just wanted to say how sorry I am that you we’re put in that kind of place hun god bless

          • Anonymous

            thank you Rhonda…I appreciate that but also want to say that there shouldn’t be a mental hospital in this day and age that is classified as “that kind of place”….I have dealt with mental illness all my life, it didn’t keep me from living a full life that included working two jobs and raising my children to be contributing members of society.  I had many episodes in my life when my disorder stopped me in my tracks and I had to be hospitalized but I always picked up my life  where I left off once I was stabilized again…what happened to me in the hospitals here reminds me of something that might have happened at the turn of the century (20th century that is) and I repeat should not be happening to anyone in these modern times.  Believe me….it is still happening as evidenced by this episode…..

          • Tom Brown III

             or do copious amounts of bath salts?

          • Guest

          • Anonymous

            Sounds like they lost their son and the boy lost his Dad way before this incident.

          • Anonymous

            the reality is at least one person in your family does something stupid, like making inane comments

          • “i’m ok with one person dying once in a while”

            Even your own child? Cuz otherwise you are just a hypocrite.

          • Anonymous

            don’t be so sure that something like this won’t happen in your family. people are stricken with mental illnesses everyday. it can happen to your family. hope if it happens to you there may be some compassion out there for the mentally ill and the hell these families go through

          • Guest

            Never say never.

          • Anonymous

            I never will be tased, unless I become a police officer and am forced to do so in order to carry a taser (source JD2008JD).

            FOR THE RECORD.

            Police Officers DO NOT have to be tased in order to carry a taser. I mean duh!

          • Anonymous

            for the record, most police departments  that adopt tasers as an option require officers to undergo a tasing during training-

          • Tom Brown III

             some do.

          • Guest

            You can’t predict the future and the police make mistakes. Wrong place at the wrong time and anything can happen to anyone. We can all minimize the chance of that happening but never say never.

          • Anonymous

             you never know what can happen, I lost a dear friend in a way I never thout would happen like I said you never know

          • Anonymous

            Stupid comment.  It is not ok to have “someone dying once in a while”.  Equally ridiculous comment about your family never finding themselves in that situation.  Your ignorance speaks volumes.

          • Anonymous

            That is correct. I am against the use of tasers, particularly in this instance where an innocent young person was killed. As far as I know, “acting up” isn’t a crime punishable by death, not before arrest and a trial, and certainly not in the state of Maine where there is no death penalty. Do the terms “innocent until proven guilty,” or “due process” mean nothing to you ? I can assure you they mean a lot to law enforcement officers.

          • Anonymous

            So if an individual resists arrest and assaults an officer for an alleged crime, the officer is supposed to do what?  Nothing? Shoot? What Bob? Obviously he is not allowed to us non lethal force in your eyes. I guess the officer is just going to let him go and let Bob take care of it if the perpetrator happens to run into Bob later in the evening.

          • Anonymous

            Where are you getting your facts in this case?

          • Anonymous

            You are now diverting the conversation. I get it.

          • Anonymous

            No I am not. I am asking how your previous statement applies to this case.

          • Anonymous

            It applies to the fact that you displayed a distaste in the use of Tazers by Law Enforcement and should be banned, and I asked you if the banning of such devises occurs, then what replacement to the Tazer would be appropriate for you, and you offered no solution. You said it was someone elses problem. So I have to assume that you offer no answer to the problem you perceive exists.  

          • Anonymous

            I said it was law enforcement’s problem. Are you in law enforcement? FYI the correct spelling is taser.

          • Anonymous

            My career choice is of no relevance. That is an arrogant statement when you condemn an approved law enforcement technique, but offer no acceptable alternative. How many times will the law enforcement establishment have to go back to the drawing board and develop new techniques before a technique finally meets your level of acceptability? How many LEO’s will die trying? How many innocent people will die while LEO’s are trying?

          • Anonymous

            Since this technique kills people and is used as non-lethal force, Yes I suggest the drawing board.

          • jimbobhol

            You know the cause of death?

          • Anonymous

            People, not this person.

          • Anonymous

            These people need to stop doing drugs and grow up! They wouldn’t have to worry about the taser if they would just do so. I am sorry, but there has to be some sort of punishment to change the behavior. I am sure you are not stupid and can plainly see that our babying these people and slapping their hands is NOT working! Put yourself in that officers shoes for a day, your attitude will change

          • Anonymous

            No, you have it all wrong, nothing is the fault of the druggy losers out there, it is all the fault of “the system<" or the wealthy or bad parenting or bad clams for dinner…the list goes on.  

            If this guy was on something (really, what are the chances), and he tried getting into somebody's house =, trust me, a taser would have been the least of his worries.  It happened, and it is very unfortunate that he died (doesn't seem like anything he did warranted death, but again, I err on the side of the police knowing when they need to tase/shoot, etc.

            That said, we STILL don't know what actually killed this person.

          • Anonymous

            There have been instances where people have died being handcuffed. This would be consideres non lethal force right. No struggle, no fight, just plain and simple handcuffed. The stresses the body goes through when a person starts putting drugs into their system is very overwhelming. So since the hands were used in the handcuffing process should they be banned or outlawed too? Police officers will look awful funny handcuffing, subduing, etc with their teeth or feet! Let’s stop being silly here. A police officer would not use the taser unless it was necessary!!! Plain and simple! I know many LEO’s in the area and none of them would put their careers on the line unless absolutely necessary. These people put their lives on the line for us everyday, not knowing what is around the next corner. For what? Peanuts! It’s a job they do because they care, not for the money!!! So let’s stop blaming the system here everytime something goes wrong. You think something needs to be changed? Take steps to fix it!!! Ranting on BDN comments will not get anything fixed and just makes you look silly!!! That is of course unless you think your ideas are just going to be laughed off:)

          • Anonymous

            They may put their lives on the line, but LEO’s as you put it sometimes create more hostility when they are directed to diffuse hostility and calm the situation. Emotions run high even for police officers. Tasers are not the answer any more than the service weapon. Let’s go back to diffuse the situation, call for back up, bring in someone to talk the situation down, subdue, handcuff, read the Miranda rights. Someone may get bruised, but that is a lot different than the electric shock of the taser. Where do you get off telling someone who does not agree with YOU that they are looking silly. Perhaps, your defense of the indefensible makes you look worse than silly. Was this man a threat to anyone? That answer is clearly NO. He is dead and, if the officer who tased has a conscience, he will be living with this for the rest of his life.

          • Anonymous

            Whatever non-lethal force was allowed and required prior to the introduction of the Taser. Again. Is the Taser the only method of non-lethal force available?

          • Maine Libertry Man

             The police could use their training to subdue them, or their baton, or pepper spray.

            Being a police officer is not a safe job, just like being a logger isnt a safe job.

          • Anonymous

            Police officers haven’t carried a “baton” in years. Maybe you missed the multiple videos of improper baton use that led to there demise.

          • Anonymous

            Some do. Even the ones that don’t carry the wooden type carry a collapsible baton that is equally as effective.

          • Anonymous

            Not one officer I know carries a wooden baton or synthetic baton. ASPs are different and again when used as trained can still cause serious injury and even death.

          • Anonymous

            LOL. Well, I guess you are not who I thought you were. Have a good day buddy. LOL.

          • Tom Brown III

             ASPs are actually potentially more deadly then a night stick. To be collapsible they have no outer rubber shell. They are made from a flexible lighter weight steel tubing (I think they have composite materials now) and so they can quickly be expanded they have a counter weight at the tip.  this enables the user to swing it much faster and all that force becomes focused at the weighted tip and there is no momentum reducing rubber to absorb the impact it is like taking a 1 pound weight tied to a 18″ string and swinging it around and axes then letting it hit someones head.

          • Anonymous

            Correct again.

          • Anonymous

            They very well may carry them privately but they aren’t supposed to anymore. At least not around here anyway.

          • Anonymous

            Your right.. Their training.. Maybe they should actually throw their training “book at ’em”. 

          • Anonymous

            and they did use their training, and part of that training is when to use a taser.

          • jimbobhol

            Maybe it was drugs that killed the man none of us know cause of death.  Law enforcement sometimes is forced to subdue people to keep them from hurting themselves or others. I would withhold judgement until the Medical Examiner and the A.G.  finish.

          • Anonymous

            and that will ensure that the truth doesn’t come out…..

          • Anonymous

            he wasn’t executed… With that bath salts issues that have been going on lately I would rather the LEO’s not getting hurt trying to arrest people who have made really poor life choices.. God Bless our Law Enforcement and may they have all tools they need to do their job and get home safely! 

          • Jonathan Smith

             I wish more on here had a freaking clue and didn’t automatically attack law enforcement when a known drug addict dies after an altercation with the police

          • Anonymous

            Don’t be offended. The problem is that there are so many people in Bangor that are now drug users, addicts or are the mother or father to one and they post here. They could have a clue if they could see the world as clearly and sober as a LE officer but they don’t, wont and are part of the problem in society. All the more reason we need more cops, more tasers and tougher laws. 

          • Tom Brown III

             amen.

          • Guest

          • Anonymous

            You ARE kidding with all your comments……right??

          • Anonymous

            There would be no intent to kill this person.  If I am a police officer, and this guy is acting in a strange way (especially given all of the bath salts losers out there), I probably would have tased him long before the police did.

            Your rant about due process, innocent until proven guilty are so completely outrageous and out of line here, I don’t know what else to say other than keep protesting “the man,” join another occupy movement and get off the internet.

          • Jonathan Smith

             Do you live in Mayberry? If you had any family who have served as law enforcement your attitude would be completely different. You seem to lump yourself into the crowd that believes that everyone is a victim and that a police officer defending himself and upholding rule of law is automatic police brutality. Police serve our community to keep it safe – if you are paranoid of their actions or presence then you must be doing something to feed that phobia of law enforcement. You may scream about innocence and due process but you know NOTHING of the case or what the officer dealt with. Details – let’s not confuse you with those darn details.

          • Anonymous

            I used to think this was Mayberry when I first moved here but I found out different….there is a mean streak a mile wide in most area natives….stands to reason that law enforcement has its share of those with that mean streak….two women guards that actually poisoned their prisoners come to mind…fed them feces and chemicals I believe, what were they protecting themselves from?…and they got caught…my question, how many didn’t  get caught cause the blue wall shielded them?   I personnally know of two and from the harassment I endured since complaining I know there are many more.  Thing is they don’t want to deal with the mentally ill but they certainly use their diagnoses to cover up when they abuse them.  If this poor guy had survived this never would have come to light what ever the reason for tasering him (and I believe that it was just to see him dance the law enforcement version of the Electric Slide) and even saying that they will cover this up in no time…..

          • Anonymous

             Forget tasers.  Lets go back to police using choke holds to subdue people.  No one ever died from one of those, Right?  Or they could just do a Rodney King on him.  You know, beat the crap out of him with batons and kicks until they stop resisting.  Whats a few broken bones or a concussion, Right?

            (Sarcasm)

          • Anonymous

            Don’t the police have effective non-lethal methods other than Tasers?

          • Anonymous

            I believe there is no 100% non-lethal tool that is effective. I mean even a fist fight can be lethal due to health, style, and accidents. I think you have to look at the larger picture. First look at how many people are tazed each year(Tazer tazes a lot of people for testing/ training/ criminals) and then divide that by the number of deaths.

          • Anonymous

            Don’t them people have brains enough to stop acting like idiots?? 

          • Anonymous

            don’t you people have any sense or compassion?  I hope you never find yourself in the sights of an unscrupulous law officer (of which there are many; they don’t call it the “Blue Wall” for nothing)…but if you do, I hope you remember your words here today in the BDN as they are abusing you with impunity…..

          • Anonymous

            Ok, what happens when they use their baton to subdue a person and say that person breaks a bone.  They then go to the hospital, get treated, develop a staph infection and die.

            Let me guess, “gee, why didn’t they just tase him?”

          • Tom Brown III

             we outlaw tasers and you will see a HUGE spike in police shootings. You take away a tool they have come to rely with on with no replacement they will fall back to old methods.

        • Anonymous

          What self-centered, “me-generation” folks forget is that “protecting and serving” does not mean just YOU.  It means doing what is best for everyone.  The public at large.  Having a monkey duster running around out of control is not safe.  

          The taser didn’t kill this man.  A bad batch of bath salts (WHich has killed no less than 4 people in the last three weeks and put 6+ more in medical coma’s) and having 6 cops sitting on top of him while they tried to get him restrained killed him.

        • Anonymous

          Yes, and in order to “protect and serve,” they have to be uninjured and ALIVE.  Don’t blame the police for this guy’s actions that put him in a position to be tased. 

        • Jonathan Smith

           That’s a nonresponse – your logic would allow every deranged person to run free in Bangor without consequences. I would love to see you put on a uniform for a day.

        • Tom Brown III

           its your problem too if they can’t control these idiots on bath salts.

      • Anonymous

        Tasers are not non-lethal. Whatever non-lethal force technique was used to subdue individuals prior to the Taser’s introduction should be used instead.

        • Anonymous

          For your reading pleasure. The ACLU has deemed them as lethal if that counts.http://www.non-lethal-weapons.com/sy03abstracts/V15.pdf

          • Anonymous

            It does. That’s what I meant by not non-lethal. However, I’m not sure if they are viewed as a lethal weapon by LEOs. 

        • Anonymous

          Yeah…that was when the police were getting their asses kicked. They protect us everyday, they need protection as well. Why don’t we outlaw the drugs….Oh wait…..we did! You see how well that works. If you outlaw anything, the only ones that will have it are the outlaws. They do not do well with following the rules, thats why they get tased.

          • Anonymous

            Boxer, law enforcement officers put their lives on the line every day. Some of their days are more stressful than others. Occasionally, their attitude is determined by the day they have been having. The ones involved with this incident need to question themselves and hopefully internal affairs will determine whether they acted correctly in this situation using a taser which may have created the circumstances for this man’s death at a young age. Even if on drugs, other means are available to subdue someone in a highly excited state. Tasers can be deadly and have been deadly. Are you positive that every police officer is always correct in their actions and reactions to a stressful situation? Are you positive that no one in this instance provoked the situation further than it should have gone? I wonder if any one of these officers involved has a feeling that this should not have happened. Check out some video of people being tasered by dash mounted cameras. Often the taser is not one jolt but several. Some situations never called for that kind of action. If they would not have pulled out their service weapon, then the taser should have stayed in place too. 

      • Anonymous

         You don’t think Tasers play a big role in the Nanny Society which you obviously despise?

        • Anonymous

          Tazers will probably be willfully and exuberantly used in the re-education camps on us non belivers when the Communists take over the country.

          • Anonymous

             Now at least I’m certain I’ve found a totally reasonable person.

      • Anonymous

        A big hug is what many want to see.

      • Anonymous

        Good question Sgt. Friday.

        Throw a net on ‘im. A dragnet.

    • Anonymous

      Yea… Lets outlaw tasers.. Bullets are cheaper anyway..

      • Anonymous

        now your talking!

    • Anonymous

      Look, the police are put in unenviable positions on a daily basis.  I am certainly giving them the benefit of the doubt at this point that the use of a taser was the appropriate response to this individual.  I am sure he didn’t deserve to die as the result of being tased, but if it comes down to a police officer being injured or hurt (not knowing what this guy with a history of mental illness and drug use) or the individual acting however he was acting to get him tased, I am erring on the side of the police.

      I think police officers show much more restraint than I would when dealing with some of the people they encounter.

      If they had not tased him, and he had pulled a knife or gun and injured/KILLED an officer, there would be countless posts on here about how the police should have tased him.

    • Anonymous

      You complain when they shoot them, you complain when they taser them!  Get a clue.  hope you never face a deadly force situation!

    • Anonymous

       I guess you would prefer they just shoot him?  Or beat him with police batons until he stops resisting? 

  • Henderson bobby

    Police need to be better trained. I can tell you first hand shock are not a good thing . What part of his body was tazed ? He was taking into custody and not charged ? Sounds like someone is trying to cover up a bit of the facts.

    • Anonymous

      Often, after a subject is taken to a hospital, unless they have been arrested for something very serious, charges are withdrawn, That way a subject does not have to be under guard, which is actually an expensive and wasteful process. Sometimes it is necessary but usually officers (who are people too) figure a subject has suffered enough for a minor matter.

      For the most part, if they still want a subject, they can come back upon discharge and re-arrest if a DA decides he wants to take a case forward.

  • Anonymous

    Being Tazed is a punishment. A pushishment should only be handed out by a Judge after being found guilty..   

    • Anonymous

      “Being Tazed is a punishment. A pushishment should only be handed out by a Judge after being found guilty..”

      Based on that logic ANY device or tool used by a police officer is “punishment”…impact weapon, flashlight, pepper spray, bean bag gun, handgun, etc…

      Maybe the police should go around and pass out cards that say “Go to Jail, Do Not Pass Go, Do Not Collect $200.00” or just say “Now don’t do that again….Naughty, Naughty”.

      But weren’t you the one saying the police had to do something about the drunks downtown standing around outside the bars and catcalling you wife. What do you want the police to do when someone will not obey them? How do you suggest they take the person into custody without “punishing” them?

    • Anonymous

      I really hope you remember that when one of the bath salts idiots break into your house and rape your daughter. You really need to be a little more logical.

      • Anonymous

        You need to quit believing the hype.

  • Anonymous

    I remember this story.  They reported that he was doing a lot of yelling right outside of the jail and in the Fire Station’s parking lot.  I thought they said that they arrested him for disorderly conduct, but that seems to be what is missing. 

    When asked about the Sept. 12 incident involving McCue, Bangor police Sgt. Paul Edwards said Thursday he was allowed to release “nothing,” but he did say McCue was not charged with any crime and was taken to the hospital.

    If he had a reaction to the tasing, then i am sure no charges were actually filed and as far as the police were concerned, end of story, junkie ends up in hospital, no more to talk about.  I am sure they had no idea that tasing him would result in his death.  I am only surprised that something like this hasnt happened sooner.  My prayers certainly go out to this young man’s family.  Obviously they have already been through a ton of pain with his drug use and phsychological problems and to have this happen and then be robbed of a couple of his final days seems more than heartless.  I also have no doubt that in this state anyway, the Attorney General’s office will once again and come down to say that no law was broken by the almighty and above the law, police and that this was justified.  They always do.  If this kid was the son of a state senator, City Councilor or someone important, we might see something done, but that is unfortunately not the case and this case will go the same way as the Greenleaf murder.
    Answer me this all you sleuths out there.  Grown man is pushed to the ground and dies, nobody pays.
    Druggies get taken out execution style and nothing reported or done yet, nobody arrested as of yet.
    Ayla Reynolds goes missing and blood is found in her father’s home belonging to her and again, nobody is arrested….Child molesters harm our children, they face less than a year in jail almost always, Druggies and Thieves are arrested daily only to be let back out to do it all over again before the afternoon, so tell me…..WHAT GOOD IS THE Bangor Police or State Police doing any of us?  They sure do a great job of writing out plenty of tickets for seatbelts….but not much else as far as i can see….JMHO!!!!

    • Anonymous

      Your right, they should be disbanded and we should call you to go arrest everybody that needs arrestin, since according to you MSP and BPD are useless.  Please leave your full name address and phone number so we can call you in case we need you. All them druggies that the police be executing will be saved!

    • Anonymous

      I really hope you don’t think the cops are the ones that let them go later that afternoon….. It must be a real slap in the face for the cops who put themselves in danger everyday and arrest these idiots to just see them back on the street later….this time with a gun. The people need to demand these people stay in jail and do their time. It is not doing any good to keep letting them go and you can thank your spineless judges and bail commisioners. Maine needs to crack down! 

    • Anonymous

      Geez JeffCol, a little harsh on the boys in blue isn’t it?

      Man I agree with some of your points fella but just writing out parking tickets and seatbelt violations….now thats a little extreme. Do you need to be reminded of all the murders they have solved, robberies they deal with everyday, unatteneded deaths, even sometimes of babies they have to investigate, pedophiles, drug addicts tearing apart everything, busting drug rings, re-creating scenes of fatal accidents…and on and on.

      I like some of your points friend and I can hear your frustration on some cases, I am equally frustrated with some of the above mentioned but to dismiss their role as parking enforcement is a little much.

      C’mon man.

      • Anonymous

        Ok, ok, i can admit that i was a little heated in immediately dismissing them as nothing more than parking attendants.  I am very frustrated and so tired of hearing all the injustice that seems to be going on.  I am not sure if its a lack of manpower, a complete breakdown of the courts, laws and judges that basically dismiss all of the good that the police enforcement does, or just a crummy set of circustances.  I dont have a law enforcement background, and i have no intent on getting one.  I do appreciate that these men and women put their lives in danger every day to deal with these losers and people complaining such as myself..but it sure would change my opinion if we could actually start wrapping up some of these long standing cases and if it didnt seem so seriously that it matters WHO the person is as to how fast justice is done, if at all.

  • Anonymous

    Judgement on how or why this happened can be on hold until all the facts are known. What can be judged is the irresponsible and callous way the police, the hospital and the doctors failed to notify Mike and Patty. There is no excuse, no reason or logic as to that happening. Those two days of laying in a coma, thought of as a “homeless” person and therefore no one cares robbed his parents of two days to try to help him and be with him. Anyone involved with Phil from the time this happened until the time his FATHER found him and didn’t even try to find his family are in their professions for the wrong reasons. Shame on every one of you.

    • Anonymous

      If they bungle simple things like notifying next of kin, how can they manage more complicated things – like medical care and treatment?

    • Anonymous

       Especially when the father IS LISTED as next of kin in the records!!!

      Maybe there is more to the story and we aren’t  just getting it, for now.

      • Davida Willette

        that is EMMCS fault they should have called that number lawsuit time a big one 

        • Anonymous

          Thats exactly what i was thinking if someones name is there as a contact they have to contact them how can they even say they thought he was homeless and n family when its right there on record infront of them… Complete ignorance

      • Davida Willette

        they are required to call if patient is incapacitated which he was . EMMC goofed. CaseManagement should have done it 

    • Anonymous

       The sad moral of this story is:  take your medicine if you’re likely to have a freakout in front of the fire station without it.

      • Anonymous

        Recreational drug use is not safe for anyone. This person was on the street hollering and may have been under the influence of bath salts. These chemicals affect the heart and brain to unknown degrees and cause the user to respond in a manner that could be seen as harmful and threatening. Taser useage is not a first line of defense but it is an alternative to physical confrontation when the defendant is non-responsive to verbal communications. A taser is a non-lethal alternative to a gun in these circumstances. Television has romanticized the plight of the mentally ill during a psychotic episode by simple restraint and administering a hypodermic of sedative. In real life trauma, mental or otherwise, there are complicated decisions to be made in split-second timing – all of which could be second guessed after the fact. Hind sight is 20/20. However, the combination of factors became lethal to this individual and it is so very sad. My heart goes out to the family who were not informed in what should have been a timely manner, and for the little boy and his mother who will have to raise his son alone. While life was difficult for Mr. McCue, I’m sure it will continue to be difficult for his family and friends. Keep them in your prayers.

        • Anonymous

          True. He was indeed causing a scene and he appeared as though he was under the influence of bath salts. He didn’t listen to police commands and was viewed as a threat to him, the officers and others. Bath salts obviously remove all sound judgement and gives people unbeleivable synthetic strength. The taser is often used where a firearm would have been used in the past. The Bangor rough crowd has changed many thanks to methadone and overall entitlements bringing a drug addicted and dependent segment to Bangor. We would be hearing about police shootings, legitimate and justifiable police shootings, if not for the taser ALL THE TIME. Some people think that would be a good thing but trust me, cops don’t like killing people even if they are scum. They are not mercenaries and are not mentally prepared to kill in the masses. Every officer should have a taser issued to them as part of their uniform. All the BPD is trained on how to use them.

          I feel very sad for the family of this man that died . I feel bad he put them through such tragedy in their life.
           

          • Anonymous

            Bipolar mania could look a lot like bath salts.  I remember an incident in Florida, just a few years ago, a man who had been on the plane was experiencing a manic episode.  Of course, security didn’t understand that, and they shot him to death.  The whole time, his wife is screaming, by his side, don’t shoot, he’s bipolar, he doesn’t have a gun.  He was not a drug addict.  He was a professional, a homeowner, a husband, a father.

            I am not second guessing law enforcement; I am thankful for their service.   But it is such a tragedy. 

            It’s not as simple as ‘take your meds’, but it does come back to that. There are very few treatment choices for people, especially those with dual diagnosis like this young man, apparently.  Folks with BP need structure.  Police need to understand that the measures they take to protect the public can escalate the problem.

            so sad, peace to the family and the officers involved.

          • Anonymous

            I agree, Bipolar mania can show similar effects to bath salts. I guess we will have to wait for the tox report.

            I agree, this is very very sad on many levels. I feel bad for the surviving family as well as the officer that was doing his job by the book perfectly to procedure.

          • Anonymous

             More Bush Propaganda, you can spin it any way you want. Phil weighed 150 lbs soaking wet, real tough cop to take him down with a taser. A REAL cop would have grabbed him by the scruff of the neck and settled him down. But  you may be right, as the COP did his job by the book he probably killed him.

          • Anonymous

            I’m not agreeing or disagreeing as I have no more details than what the paper states and I think we all can agree that the newspaper is rarely a good source for accurate details. However, I will just say that whether he was on drugs or whether it was due to a mental disorder, it is oftentimes much more difficult to settle a person down than just to grab someone by the scruff of the neck and  rough them up. Also, law enforcement are taught not to allow someone who seems out of control within reaching distance of them because even though they may not have weapons, the officers DO and who knows what could have happened had an upset person gotten his hands on those items. As someone who has worked in the medical field, a taser is proven to not be lethal unless someone has underlying health conditions which may have been impossible for the police officer to know about. It’s a tragedy, it truly is. Without being there I can’t say if it could have been handled differently but I think maybe pointing fingers at the officer right now is a bit pre-mature. He probably feels horrible as he obviously didn’t intend to kill the poor man.

          • Anonymous

            That old saying comes to mind. Its not the size of the dog in the fight but the size of the fight in the dog.

          • Anonymous

             thank you! more people need to understand what it’s like to have BP

          • Anonymous

            You’re welcome.  there’s a lot of creativity and beauty with BP, also.  I was on a comment forum a few years ago discussing BP; a teenager gets on there and posts, “Wow. I have BP and *never* knew there was anything negative about it, my parents always told me how lucky I was to be so gifted.”

            What wonderful people his parents must be, how lucky that young person is to have them. Why can’t we all understand it like that?

            peace.

          • Anonymous

             You are as intelligent as your namesake. There has been NO evidence to date that he was on bathsalts. Withhold judgement. We know very few facts. Just like your namesake said weapons of mass distruction were in Iraq. He was wrong then with his misinformation tactics and your wrong now.

          • Anonymous

            No evidence in the BDN? Is what is reported in the BDN eveidence? Wow. Intelligent. There are other sources that are much better and I will leave it at that. Regarding my namesake, jealousy gets you nowhere. Go occupy 1600 Pennsylvania Ave instead of mammas basement and maybe you could get a little respect too. 

          • Anonymous

            Isn’t that where Bush got his evidence for the war in Iraq? The
            newspaper? No wait, it was the Iraqi Gossip column online. No wait, it was in the Sunday comics, the only part of the paper he understands. Hide in my Mommies basement? You mean like he hid in the Texas Air National Gaurd? No wait, he was in Lousiana, hmm not there either. It is sad that you have “sources” and the the Parents still don’t know anything, yeah I would be REAL proud of that.

          • Anonymous

            I am and your jealous, get over it, you’ll be happier. 

            Regarding WMD in Iraq, I doubt he had any intelligence that said Hussein had ’em, I think he just wanted any excuse to go kill the guy that tried to kill his dad.

          • Anonymous

             Real Nice. How many Americans died for that vengenance? Yeah, I would be a fan of his too.

          • Anonymous

            Oh I forgot, Saddam Hussien also mudered thousands of his own people that disagreed with him as well as many of our soldiers. Good thing we don’t let our leaders do that huh? Poll our military to see if they think they were doing good for the Iraq people while there and if Iraq is now a safer place.

            You blame Bush, I get it. I blame Obama for putting more Americans out of work and on welfare during his past 4 years than any President in history. Oh well. This story isn’t about your boy or mine so I’m done with you.

          • Anonymous

            untrue– its the BUSH recession, even republicans say so- don’t talk about subjects you don’t understand -like economics and the real reason bush went to war in Iraq- read a little what some of his administration had to say

          • Anonymous

            No, actually it is the OBAMA recession because he has the responsibility for an additional $6 trillion in new debt.  I’m no particular fan of George W. Bush but I’m sick of people who don’t bother to avail themselves of sources outside MSNBC, CBS, and, yes, even Fox.  I’ve read and researched just how we got into this mess and everything Barack Obama has done has taken us from walking over the cliff of financial disaster to a dead run.  Obama told David Letterman that he didn’t even know what the national debt was!  Unbelieveable.  Finally, just once I’d like to see a liberal make an argument without resorting to name-calling.  I’d also like to have a president who loves this country as much as I do, who truly believes in its goodness and people, who doesn’t denigrate a segment of the population which holds beliefs he may not share.  For all his faults, I NEVER heard George W. Bush call an American citizen an insulting name, as Barack Obama did when he referred to “tea bagger”.  If that’s what you choose to support, go right ahead, but don’t call me names because I don’t. 

          • Guest

            It’s the Bush recession. It began with him.
            He owns it.

          • Anonymous

             this story is about that young man and his family please they have enoff on there plate

          • Anonymous

            One of the  reason our Troops went to Iraq is because all of America wanted it to happen! The day of and the day after 9/11 happened we were all outraged and wanted revenge and Justice and that includes the Victims familys!! We were all very animate about what we expected our President at the time to do about it, and so he did. Just because it hasnt worked out the way we would all have liked doesnt mean it was entirely his fault.  Everyone should take a little blame in the outcome. You all would have expected the same if it were Obama or Clinton or whoever was in Office at the time. Let’s all be honest about this for a change.  I dont believe any of us thought this ugly war would still be going on all these years later. (Just my opinion)

          • Anonymous

            Wow presumtpious ont he namesake…. I thought he was a Nascar fan of one of the brothers.  or mayne Bush’s Baked Beans.  Maybe you sohouldn’t assume yourself and stop getting baked katahdinfan!!!

          • Anonymous

            If they only knew. Ha.

          • Guest

            You assume much. Doesn’t your boat need polishing?

          • Anonymous

            Ya know, I had it taken out Monday. I was a sad day indeed.

            I assume nothing I just have better sources than anyone on this board.

          • Anonymous

            cite them…

          • Anonymous

            Please…..

          • Anonymous

            Sure, please

          • Anonymous

            Just an FYI, confidential sources don’t last long once they become exposed, just incase you didn’t know.

          • Anonymous

            Sorry. Your message could not be delivered to:

            jonathan vance,University of Maine (The name was not found at the remote site. Check that the name has been entered correctly.)

          • Anonymous

            Maybe I spent too many years in the South, but we’d just call that ‘gossip’.  I guess here in Maine though, it’s …………confidential?

        • Anonymous

           Electrocution by government is never healthy either.

        • Tasers, if used correctly and in the appropriate circumstances may be considered non-lethal, assuming that the person who is tased has no health problems that would contraindicate it’s use such as heart disease, high blood pressure, etc. However, in recent months the manufacturers of these products have indicated that many of the reported cases of death from the use of the tasers have been due to improper usage by law enforcement. This has led them to rethink the classification of non-lethal, as it applies to real world use. As yet, no decisions have been made to change the classification but the debate goes on. 

          I do not know the circumstances of this young man’s tragic death. That will remain a secret until such time TPTB decide to release their version of the cause and manner of death.

          • Tom Brown III

             they need to start marketing them as less than lethal products like bean bag rounds.

    • Anonymous

      I should no longer be stunned by the inability of police and hospitals in this state to actually employ common sense but here I am again. INFORM NEXT OF KIN. This heartless ignorance is a disgrace.

    • Anonymous

      Maybe judgment on how or why the family didn’t make it to the hospital for two days should be put on hold until all the facts are known.  Amazing how quickly you are to use that line to protect this man from any wrong doing he may have done, but on the same hand condemn the police, doctors and hospitol on information from this same article.

      • Anonymous

        Well Said!

      • Anonymous

        maybe unlike bushfan we have the truth

    • Anonymous

      Nowhere in the news article did it say that anyone knew who the young man was, If he had no form of identification on his person.
      Did the hospital know who he was? If not how in he!! could they possibly notify the family? He was in a coma and certainly could not tell anyone who he was.
      Maybe everyone should carry ID, I forgot… people can not afford IDs. or even have a tattoo applied at birth so that they could be identified in such a case. Another idea would be a RFID chip placed under the skin.

      • Davida Willette

        they had his fathers phone number as next of kin . they did not call

        • Anonymous

          But if hospital personell did not know who the person was they would not be able to look up his file and find his fathers name.

          • Anonymous

             The police knew who he was, the police brought him in. I’m sure the police told them his name…

        • Anonymous

          I just re read the article and NOWHERE in the article does it say that the police or anyone else knew who he was before becoming comotose.
          I am positive that if the hospital knew who he was they would have contacted the family. There is a financial motive there. And everyone knows that hospitals are greedy.

    • Anonymous

      He died 5 days later.. The police dont track patients that are admitted to the hospital and do not call mommy and daddy when they are brought somewhere.

      • Davida Willette

        hospital had his dads phone number should have called big NONO

      • Anonymous

        No they just drop them off at the hosptial brain dead and call it a day

      • Anonymous

         Well they track them if they’re the reason they are in the hospital, and the hospital is obligated to call mommy and daddy if mommy and/or daddy is on the contact sheet.

        Now go stand in the corner and face the wall until you’re ready to think before you post.

    • Dixie Recked

      I think Gilligan over at Acadia would of helped out

      • Anonymous

        Real sensitive, hate to have you as an advocate for the mentally ill

  • Anonymous

    How are the police suppose to handle people on bath salts? 

    We don’t know if it was anxiety, drugs or if the Taser caused anything — we just don’t know,” Patty McCue said.
    Her stepson was an eyewitness to the June 9, 2011, death of Bangor resident Melvin F. Abreu, 28, at an apartment on Fourth Street, and his former roommate said Thursday that McCue had recently been hanging out with a known user of the synthetic drug bath salts, and possibly was using the drug himself.

    • Anonymous

       What did th epolice do before tasers? Restrain them, hold them? Call in for additional help? Now it is better to inflict pain and possible death? No proof of bath salts yet. I hope you don’t have an anxiety attack in front of a police officer, they will think your on bath salts and bring you to your knees or shock you to death.

      • Anonymous

        “No proof of bath salts yet.”

        No proof the Taser had anything to do with the person death either.

        • Anonymous

          One way a taser could be ruled out, if it wasn’t used on him!

          • Anonymous

            And he may be just as dead too.

            He was agitated according to the article. That means his heart rate, respiratory rate, etc…were all elevated. Was it because of drug use? Don’t know but I do know that a person with elevated heart rate, respiratory rate, etc…is more likely to suffer a cardiac event then one with normal heart rate, respirator rate, etc…

          • Anonymous

             Could be, but that would be a medical condition and not a crime. No person or property harmed, no crime.

          • Anonymous

            From the article “Patty McCue said of her stepson. “He was out in front of the fire
            department and had a cardiac arrest. He was outside hollering.””

            The possible crime(s) committed were “disturbing the peace”, “criminal trespass” to name two.

          • Anonymous

            The reason given to the public for why tasers were a good idea was because they were to be used IN LIEU of shooting someone dead, and only to be used when shooting someone dead was the ONLY OTHER OPTION. Remember that?

          • Tom Brown III

             thats not true. I never heard of a taser being marketed as a in lieu of deadly force weapon system. I have heard quite the opposite in my taser training. In a situation that calls for deadly force such as a subject with a gun, knife, or other deadly weapon a taser is not to be used.

            They are used to gain compliance.

    • Anonymous

      Not by torturing them with a Taser with the possibility of killing them.

  • Anonymous

    I do not know enough about tasers to say that they should be banned. I do think that incidents like this suggest that more training on proper use needs to be done, and perhaps further safety testing. It is possible that for someone with cardiac issues, they are more unsafe but without further study, who knows for sure?

  • Anonymous

    There are around 50 people a year that die from being tazed in the USA… Since they are killed by the police and may be criminals, nobody cares… Any death is to many..

    What laws did Maine pass that exempts the makers of tazers from Liability? Time for new laws to allow lawsuits for damages from tazers…

     

    • Anonymous

      Any numbers on the amount of people tazed each year?

      • Anonymous

        ??? No. The amount of deaths was way lower then I thought…. I don’t know if the Police have a form they use if they have to taze or not.. I would bet in the millons… I think the Bangor Police are probably some of the most professional in the State, probably New England.  I respect them.  If I make a bad product I can’t get an exemption from a lawsuit, Yet the corporations making tazers seem to be exempt from lawsuits. 

        • Anonymous

          Don’t think they are exempt to a lawsuit. Actually I do believe they have been sued before.

          • Tom Brown III

             several times. and I don’t believe they have lost yet because the scientific evidence is valid.

            however talking about a bad product. The XREP/X12 round has been dropped by taser because it is not reliable and can cause serious bodily harm due to its inaccuracy as a projectile. Though they could have been dishonest and continue making them because after the success of the x26 they would have sold a boat load on that reputation.

    • Tom Brown III

       citation?

  • Anonymous

    So we outlaw tasers but the cops can keep the guns???  

    • Anonymous

       Yes.

  • Boogie_Bangor

    I have heard from a reliable source that 5 police were involved in all.  If  this is the case, then the use of anything other than proper police trained restraint is NOT EVEN CLOSE to being warranted. 

  • Anonymous

    I think if this young man was using bath salts, that his death will be so attributed. If bath salts were the reason he was unruly, if that was the case, then Tasing him was certainly a better option than shooting him. 

    Tasers have been implicated in other deaths but they are less deadly than using a gun or in most cases a club. It is generally very unsafe to use a club on a person who is seriously agitated as that often makes the problem worse not better, and the situation escalates.

    I am so sorry for the young man and his family, this is beyond tragic and I offer my condolences and my prayers for you. 

    I believe in years to come it will be shown that the Taser, like getting hit at exactly the right moment with a baseball to the chest, can interrupt the electrical signal to the heart and in some situations will cause serious problems. I do believe that the Taser has already saved the lives where it has been used instead of a gun and we as a society, will have to decide the place the Taser should have. My personal opinion right now, is that it should only be used in lieu of a gun, in a situation where a subject is not armed with a deadly weapon. I don’t believe law enforcement should be using a Taser on the unruly(Or intoxicated) to enforce compliance. I believe officers should wait for sufficient back up to take subjects like McCue into custody, or if a subject is trying to flee and deemed to be a danger to others. But, that is just my humble (and uneducated) opinion.

    I know a lot of law enforcement people read these comments, how about a reply with your opinion. I will respect your opinion even if I do not agree. Maybe I am being overly simplistic?

    • Anonymous

      What if he was on drugs prescribed to him at the Mental health hospital? The Police knew of his mental health history…  

        

    • Anonymous

      Use of  taser must be reserved for grave situations to avoid the use of deadly force. Tasers should be outlawed even in the hands of law enforcement officers. We have all seen the effects of a taser which too often are used thinking that the officer needs to take charge of a situation. Sometimes the officer does not make the correct decision before using one. I doubt that the officer/s would have shot at this victim for his behavior on the street, but that will be up to the officer to admit. If he was not inclined to shoot, then he should have not been pulling out a weapon like this taser either. Tasers have been too easy to use claiming the necessity. If in fact, there were five officers on the scene, someone could have called another kind of professional in counseling to deal with the situation and calm it down. Even a bear wandering into town gets a tranquilizer instead of a taser. Don’t you even wonder why? If animal control tasered an animal, there would be a deadly situation. Even a cattle prod does not have the same intensity as a taser.

      Outlaw the taser for everyone–

      • Anonymous

        What do you suggest?

        • Anonymous

          I suggest you read the post again. I made a suggestion for officers, “If in fact, there were five officers on he scene, someone could have called in another kind of professional in counseling to deal with the situation and calm it down.” The questions the officers should be asking themselves is whether this man was such a danger to himself that a taser was absolutely necessary and whether anything they did contributed to the escalation of the situation to the point they had no choice but to pull a weapon. Yes, Boxer, a taser is a dangerous weapon and not a toy nor a joke.
          Five officers and one man—and no possibility of being able to subdue and arrest without a taser. Something does not add up. 

      • Anonymous

        “If in fact, there were five officers on the scene, someone could have
        called another kind of professional in counseling to deal with the
        situation and calm it down.”

        And who would you call and how long do you wait for them to arrive? How do you contain the person while waiting for this person to arrive? And what do you do when the person blocks emergency vehicle (remember he was in front of a fire station) from leaving to go on an emergency call? What do you do with the crowd that almost always arrives over time to watch the person causing the disturbance?
        ~~~~~
        “Even a bear wandering into town gets a instead of a tranquilizer instead of a taser. Don’t you even wonder why? If animal
        control tasered an animal, there would be a deadly situation.”

        And when the person died from an allergic reaction to the tranquilizer people would be screaming “why didn’t they use something else”. Every device used by the police to control a person has the potential to cause injury or death.
        ~~~~~
        “Even a
        cattle prod does not have the same intensity as a taser.”

        Ever wonder why people die when they come in contact with “household” voltage of 120/240?

        • Anonymous

          You can’t be serious. You believe in the taser; I never have. You are giving excuses for the inexcusable. This man died possibly as a result of a taser and he is not the first and will not be the last as long as police officers use them. If a drawing a service weapon was not something that should have been done in this situation, then drawing a taser is equally a poor choice. The officers will need to live with this man’s passing once information becomes available. As for blocking emergency vehicles, then he is subdued by five cops, cuffed and hauled off. Did you read something I didn’t read in that story about an emergency vehicle being blocked by him? As I said—you can’t be serious. Five to one was the ratio PLUS a taser—watch some videos, then tell me why police officers should be pulling a taser. Better yet, agree to be tasered a few times. Then you may change your mind.

          • Anonymous

            gambler I was responding to your post with questions. i.e.what do you do…..I never said that the article indicated he prevented an emergency vehicle from leaving.

            Now I have a question for you as you like to point out things that are not included in the article.

            I have read and re-read the story 4 times now. Where in this article does it say “five cops” were at the scene?

          • Anonymous

            It is in one of the posts from someone who seemed to be privvy to some information. Just as there is something regarding a poster mentioning that he had been a patient at the hospital and his parents’ information was on file. Now, the hospital will be investigating because no one tried to inform his family. I usually read posts before deciding whether or not to make a comment.

            I have pointed out some protocol whether or not you want to accept it is up to you. You gave a what if and I found nothing to indicate that was a circumstance that was plausible.

            You may champion the police on this one, and I agree that do a yeomen’s job. But, in the use of tasers, this town should take a good hard look at the necessity of them. People have had episodes totally unrelated to drug use and have had episodes related to drugs long before bath salts arrived on the scene. Being able to diffuse the situation is key even for a swat team. A hollering man is not an imminent threat to anyone. Use of force should not be pulling a taser. In a situation like this one, one would be hard pressed to believe that the officer would ignore calling for back up first rather than pull a taser. Hope your loved ones never face this situation because they had a little too much to drink or a prescription they were given created a bad reaction.
             

          • Tom Brown III

             gambler doesn’t understand the concept of a force continuum. He is thinking that tasers should only be used at the end of the continuum when deadly force is called for i.e.

            A subject is brandishing a weapon at an officer possibly a firearm, possibly firing at an officer. At this point lethal force is authorized and the threat has to be neutralized. Tasers have a maximum range of 21′ and we all know that most firearms even shotguns and .22lr can be lethal up to several hundred yards.

            If tasers will only be authorized in deadly force situations then we might as well take them away and let the officer carry a backup weapon or extra ammunition because a taser in a gun fight is a quick ticket to the morgue. Along with effective range limitations tasers also rely on maintaining connection. the wire leads attaching to the probes are surprisingly flimsy and the probes need to get at least 8″ of separation for NMI to occur.

            over 3 million people have been tasered to date and there are only around 600 cases of death in incidents where tasers were used.  If you rule out cases where the suspect was also shot or on drugs that is whittled down further to more like 300 probably where pre existing health conditions existed. but that is  .001%.

      • Anonymous

         There was also a man shot in Oakland CA when the officer claimed he thought he had pulled out his taser but had actually pulled out his gun, remember that?

  • Anonymous

    ” The Bangor Police Department’s Taser guns can produce a 50,000-volt
    shock when used and are capable of incapacitating a person for five
    seconds.”

    What a silly quote from this article.  Yeah, they’re intended to incapacitate a person for 5 seconds ––– but they’re capable of causing multiple heart attacks and death.

  • Anonymous

    How many deaths is a exceptable amount by tazer?  Everything is OK until some elitist family member is killed by one of these.. Fact…

    The moose hunt used to be 1000 taken per year and many tried to get it raised. Not until someone important in southern Maine got kill running into a moose did they raise the limit to 1500 moose. Almost overnight.

    • Anonymous

      How many deaths are exceptable when these drug users break in to peoples homes and beat the people to death, or shoot them for not wanting to give them thier medications?? I will tell you….NONE except for the druggie doing the crime!

      • Anonymous

        I do not believe this man broke into any home. If someone breaks into your home shoot them please.  I believe he was tazered in the back seat of the Police car.

      • Jonathan Smith

         Maybe the BDN will eventually run an article on the constant home invasions by dangerous prescription drug users who have to get their fix. Or maybe how at least one Rite Aid a week gets robbed. Of course they will pander to the junkie as if he is somehow a victim and not the homeowner – law abider, etc

  • Anonymous

    Not your clique I take it… what other groups of people is it alright to kill off  ? You decide, your in charge of who lives or dies OK?

  • I’m not saying I have the answers as to how police should restrain or control disorderly people.
    But I do know that no one, including the indigent, mentally ill, or drug users deserve to be treated like an animal! Call me a bleeding heart if you will but I feel there is a big  difference between being a nusaince and being a danger.
    If a person becomes violent and combative and the only other alternative is shooting them then yes, I can see where a taser is a better choice. 
    But it seems like the PD thinks using the taser is an improved method for dealing with unruly citizens? I think use of the taser is a gamble… with every use we wait to see who lives and who dies.
    Mr and Mrs McCue I do not know you but I am so sorry for your loss. I hope you recieve the answers you are looking for and find peace.

  • I believe the Bangor Police Dept is the best law enforcement organization in the State. I plan to give them a chance to  finish their investigation before I jump all over them. They have there hands full with all kinds of off bubble individuals everyday in Bangor, and they do the job well. Give em a break until the facts come out.

  • Boogie_Bangor

    One must wonder these facts:

    1.  If the police are able to taser people, are they trained to administer CPR if the victim goes into cardiac arrest?  It sounds like this could very well have been the case with Philip.

    2.  I am a relative and know for a fact that Philip was brain dead when he arrived at the hospital.  How long after he passed out did it take for the police to administer CPR,  assuming they are capable?  Do they simply report a medical issue and wait for medical personnel to arrive.  If they are allowed to use tasers, then they should be required to treat someone medically.  We all know that once a heart stops, resuscitation is vital within minutes.

    3.  Are the police stereotyping, or assuming that because a person is hollering and screaming that it’s automatically drugs? I recently had a freaky bout I don’t do drugs.  I found out later that it was most likely Vertigo.  I can assure you that it was very scary.  I’m glad nobody tasered me.

    Rest in peace Philip. 

    • Anonymous

      If I’m reading correctly this happened in front of the fire station- I’m sure he received care as soon as it was obvious he was in more trouble than just being “tasered”. 
      With all the methadone clinics around, all the bath salt problems and the large number of mentally ill walking the streets of this city the police are doing the best they can at protecting the citizens of Bangor. Since Mr. McCue had a drug problem he could have had a heart problem.

      I’m sorry for your family’s loss, but this isn’t the “fault” of the police.

  • Anonymous

    Drug withdrawal is more likely to cause cardiac arrest than a stun gun.

  • Anonymous

    Let me help you all out with what the investigation will tell…once again the police are perfect and did no wrong and acted within the legal standards Lmao! Sympathy goes to the family and the over reacting officers there is a special place awaiting you in hell.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe using pepper spray would have been a better choice?

    How are police expected to avoid these possible deaths if they have no idea what the medical history is of the person they’re trying to subdue.

    “He was stricken after [he was] in custody and died about a week later in the ICU,” she said, referring to EMMC’s intensive care unit.

    Why would an officer use a taser if the person is in custody?

    • Anonymous

      I believe that “stricken” in this statement means that he went into cardiac arrest.  Not that he was tased.  So, I don’t believe that he was tased after her was restrained and controlled by law enforcement

    • Anonymous

      Any chemical “restraint” or physical “skill” used by a police officer has the potential of causing injury or death.

    • Davida Willette

      the behaviour before then he was tazered  the guy collasped then he was in custody

  • Anonymous

    Who knows what to do. I don’t want their jobs. this is a mess.

  • Anonymous

    My heart goes out to the family however, we don’t know the full story why he had to be was tased but I hope that nobody is thinking that Bangor PD goes around tasing people for no reason. We are going though some crazy stuff around here with drugs and people robbing people that I think that when people start thinking the worse without seeing the facts that it is sad. Bangor PD needs you to support them until you have facts. Just my thoughts I guess. Also I would think the hospital should have been the ones looking for next o kins.

    • Anonymous

       Get rid of the tasers and there will be no question about the use of them or the context. Get rid of the tasers.

      • Tom Brown III

         and see a massive increase in baton related injuries and fatal shootings.

  • No matter what mistakes Phillip may have made in his life, his death is still a tragedy. He was a very sweet guy who always made me smile. My prayers are with his family.

  • PaulNotBunyan

    1) Until the medical examiner’s report is finished, there’s no reason to be ranting and raving about a taser being the cause of death. His family says they knew he was a recreational drug user and a former roommate says he might have started using bath salts. Best thing to do is wait for the toxicology results.

    2) If this happened in front of a fire station, I’m sure somebody with CPR training was there right away.

    3) I wouldn’t blame EMMC at all unless BPD had provided them with a specific name AND phone number for next of kin. They would need that along with authorization to directly contact next of kin. Otherwise, the agency that has custody is the only point of contact. A hospital can’t do it any other way when the patient “belongs” to a law enforcement or corrections agency. It was the responsibility of BPD to try to locate a family member and inform them of the situation.

  • Please note that of the reported deaths associated with Taser’s many/most have been person’s suffering from a condition called “Excited Delirium”. People suffering with ED can have sudden cardiac arrests from physical altercations as well. This means in most cases if a Taser had not been used the subject may very well have died as a result of the physical altercation from their arrest. The Taser allows for greater officer and arrestee safety in most cases as it does not require direct violent contact.

    • Anonymous

      “…in most cases…” is not good enough.

      • Uh, yes it really has to be. Let’s see you list the “absolutes” of law? Statistics are used every day to evaluate and determine the legal safety of human life in this country. We use ‘in most cases” for approving medicine, determine the safety of products and even in food safety. 

    • Tom Brown III

       ICDS

  • Anonymous

    Bath Salts are DEADLY…………..

  • Anonymous

    How long, Oh Lord?

    How long will it be before your people realize that the Democrats, the Republicans, and their bosses, the money lenders have created a totally dysfunctional society?

    They are picking us off one by one, with debt, drugs, disease, and decay.

    • Anonymous

       Not exactly one by one, but certainly the ones who have no idea what’s happening. You are right and I can almost bet either no one listens to you, or they say you don’t know what you’re talking about.

    • Tom Brown III

       I hear ya dude I hear ya.

      Too bad anyone who challenges the status quo of the establishment is silenced with the “conspiracy theory nut” paradigm.

  • Anonymous

    Where were these people that care so much about Phil when he was living with is mentally ill brother on Garland street? where were they when he was getting busted by the police every night living on his own at age 17. Where were the same people win his brother moved into a pedophiles home?

    They act so offended but the fact is they have never been around ,why would anything be different today?

    • Anonymous

      Good point.  It is like family members of gang members in the inner city. The gang member eventually gets shot by police committing a crime, the family members come out of the wood work and try to blame the cops.

      • Anonymous

        Get real. This immature comment must be coming from someone who hasn’t a life.

    • Anonymous

      BangorBully, You don’t have a clue what your talking about. This family has been through enough grief without stupid comments like yours. This family has always been there for him. Do you realize that anytime in your life you can be stricken with a mental illness. Hope you never find out what a family goes through trying to help someone with a mental illness. The whole purpose of the article was why was he taken to the hospital and just left. They called the police station and asked if they knew where he was and was told nothing. People are jumping to conclusions that he was on something. Maybe he needed help. Let this family grieve and get a live.

  • Anonymous

    There have been over 85 Maine police officers killed in the line of duty, as a result of conflicts with individuals, and not all of the deadly attacks on Maine police officers involved guns.

    There have been in this month alone, about 5 Maine police officers hurt,injured/ or violently attacked and or had a car hit their police car, in the state of Maine.

    Like everyone else that goes to work, police officers have a right to go home alone alive at the end of the day

    If you think a Phillip A. McCue was just standing and doing nothing, and got shot by a tazer. your living in La la land or your objectivity is tainted by bias.

    • Anonymous

      If someone is violent towards the police to where the officers are in fear of their lives, they can shoot that person. A taser is not being used in the way it was “sold” to the public when introduced, or did you forget? Yes, I am in favor of shooting a dangerous person in self defense. Using a taser to force compliance with police is wrong.

    • Jonathan Smith

       The Bangor Daily would never run an article about how many police officers in Maine have been killed or how many lives have been saved by using a taser in the last ten years. They simply want to publish anything to create drama and sell papers. Phillip A McCue made choices – bad choices. It’s tragic but he decided to go where he should not have gone. Most likely, he assaulted the officer but the PD isn’t releasing information yet understandably. Usually, tasers are employed when the officer is assaulted and many perpetrators will try to harm the officer or reach for his gun – but feel good liberals on here dont see that as a problem.

      • Anonymous

        There are videos on Youtube almost daily where police officers use the Taser inappropriately, although I am not going to accuse the Bangor Police of doing so, because we really don’t have the details in this case as it is still under investigation. 

        I believe restricting the Taser to the same standard as the gun, to be used when a subject is not armed with a gun or knife (i.e. actively threatening with it). There have been many news stories where officers have Tased a subject who is cuffed and is being verbally abusive. That is an incorrect use of a Taser. I can sympathize with an officer who is being abused verbally, it must be incredibly frustrating while trying to deal with the other details of an incident, but it does NOT justify the use of the Taser.

        Simply, because an officer can never predict the outcome, when force is used, they should be so careful in using any kind of force. I believe that most officers realize this and try not to use any kind of force, but as we have seen in these same news stories, sometimes it is necessary when a subject refuses to obey an officer and becomes agitated. I hope every police department, Bangor included, will look at this outcome and review their policies regarding force, but officers should not be hampered in doing their jobs either.

        • Tom Brown III

           I agree about not using a taser on an already restrained subject except in cases of fleeing or violence (you can still kick and bite cuffed behind your back).

          However I am confused about the limiting it to standards of a firearm? you mean like if somone unarmed is attacking or threatening to attack you? That is reasonable I guess but if disparity of force exists then deadly force becomes authorized and a sidearm is a far more effective in stopping an attack.

          • Jonathan Smith

             People who want to limit a taser to the standards of a firearm clearly cannot understand what deadly force entails verses “less lethal” force and how that plays into an incident where the appropriate level of force must be used. In reality, they do not understand that  a taser is an enormous blessing to society because it is a tool that often keeps a dangerous situation from escalating to the level of lethal force.

          • Tom Brown III

             exactly. Nothing has ever made me wanna fight less then a 5 second taser ride.

        • Anonymous

           Inappropriate use of a Taser is wrong, and justified in a lawsuit. Such as, Tasing someone in handcuffs and secured in a car. Agreed. But YouTube also has videos of people skateboarding off rooftops, but not everyone with a skateboard does it…

  • Jonathan Smith

    “Recreational drug use” and “synthetic bath salts”. Tragic for the family but something like this was bound to happen. A Taser won’t trigger a heart attack but heavy drug use will certainly make that vital organ of the body useless.  I am thankful for one that the police officer went home safe at the end of his or her shift. We all make choices in life – try to avoid the BAD ones – for example stay drug free, get a job – contribute to society like everyone else. If you are on medication because you have some serious problem – take your medication.

    • Anonymous

      Tasers wil trigger a heart attack if tasered in the left chest. And to be brain dead, he went without oxygen for 15 minutes. The comments about taking your medication, get a job. Read the obituary he worked. How do you know he wasn’t taking his meds and if he was even on any. People who have never had someone in their lives with a mental illness are so quick to judge. This can happen to anyone in your family at any time.

      • Anonymous

        Incorrect. LOL. The test done by an “independent”  group placed one probe in the chest near the heart and one around the back, so the current went from front to back, a shot that could never happen. It did not cause a heart attack, but did show a jump in the EKG, so Taser recommended officers try not to aim for the chest if possible, more so because that “independent” study (LOL) could lead to lawsuits. But hell, don’t let the facts get int he way.

        • Tom Brown III

           where did u get your taser class?

          • Anonymous

            I’m an instructor. And is your dad a pilot?

          • Tom Brown III

             no not to my knowledge lol. he was a deputy for penobscot and piscataquis back in the day he has been out of law enforcement for over 20 years.

            I received taser training during my college internship with Rockingham country sheriffs office in NH. I actually took the class with several different groups of deputies and correctional officers because I enjoyed it and the operations commander didn’t always have stuff to occupy my time.

      • Tom Brown III

         Dunno who told you that but the waveform from the tasers pulse do not have the amplitude and low frequency to penetrate the human body like that and affect organs.

        Mental illness is not an excuse to let someone put other peoples safety in jeopardy. I have someone in my life with mental illness, maybe not serious to this extent but regardless police have to think about themselves and those around them when responding with force and not just about what will happen to the subject.

        • Anonymous

          never said it was ok to put someone else’s life in danger. just think we need to know the truth and not judge everyone as the same

          • Tom Brown III

             not judge everyone as the same? I thought that is what the progressive liberals have been clamoring about for years?!

            I think I can infer your meaning though… not deal with every subject the same and judiciously administer force? I agree really old, really fat unhealthy looking people, very young… all probably best to not tase them.

  • Anonymous

    dangerous villian get tazed.  http://youtu.be/EK60wynrIIc

  • Anonymous

    Reading some of the comments I take it the only other option to tazing people is to shoot people..  so the Tazer saved thousands of Mainers from getting shot this year.. Yet before the age of the tazer maybe one person got shot per year by police.  I can see the logic.

  • Anonymous

    Tasers do not kill people.  Bathsalts however do. But again you all can blame the police like always.  The man was out of control and unfortunately needed to be subdued for his safety and the safety of others.  Bathsalts are dangerous and lethal and this is not the first death because of them.  I am very sorry for his family.

  • Anonymous

    “Don’t taze me Bro”… !!!
    Sad ending to a young man…

  • Anonymous

    i would have a lawsuit against police and hospital what bunch of bull,these tasers seem to kill just as much as real guns,cant they turn voltage down or sumin
     

    • Tom Brown III

       ignorance. There isn’t one proven taser death. there have been over a million uses of tasers since its inception in the 90’s. maybe a few hundred cases of ICDS (in custody death syndrome google it ).

      1000 people were tased in an independent study 99.7% sustained no major injuries. The biggest injury I have seen with tasers are people falling hard and the probes being removed incorrectly or the worse falling on a probe just right ouchy…

      anyhow try shooting 1000 people in the chest with a 9mm JHP from 21 feet and see how many survive.

  • Dixie Recked

    What about Gilligan at The Acadia Hospital?

  • Anonymous

    If its taser related, the Police are looking at a good lawsuit.  I will not speculate, but i have feeling that is what it is, since they are taser happy or gun happy.

    • Tom Brown III

       haha fat chance dude wait until Taser sends their legal team out… and the police union lawyers.

    • Anonymous

      You are consistantly on here making anti police comments. Guess life near Second St. must not be what it used to be.. Moral of the story you have no idea what you’re talking about. Also Tom Brown III is correct. Taser has literally tens of thousands of studies along with a legal team which includes doctors. Thanks for the arm chair opinion though!

      • Anonymous

        Second street what are you talking about, maybe you should rephrase your opininon and comment to someone you know.  Enjoy your day 

      • Anonymous

        Oh i forgot to mention maybe you should read the rules for posting again

        • Anonymous

          Insert whiney noise. 

  • Anonymous

    Everyone needs to stop jumping to their own conclusions and realize that a family lost one of their family members in this. Show some respect to the deceased, no matter what the situation may have been.

  • Davida Willette

    a big fat lawsuit in the making 

    • Anonymous

      You can sue some one for anything doesnt mean they will win..

  • Anonymous

    I read the article . I do not believe the family is asking for any thing that other people with children would want to know,how did their child die and why did they have to find out for themselves that their child was in the ICCU  dying? They understand that police have to use tasers in certain situations. They admitted Phillip had a dual diagnosis and he might have been on bathsalts. I am sure they did not want to inform the public of his life history. They did not mention how many times they had tried to seek help for their son. There is only so much a family can do to help a person who will not accept that he has an illness, but what they did do was love him completely,and tomorrow they will bury him, and their lives will be filled with sadness for a long time. They will probably never get over the loss and will always wrestle with the Question of what else they could have done to save their son. They did not go to the news seeking pity, It was the only avenue left to them to find answers.

  • Anonymous

    People have blamed pepper spray on deaths. People don’t like the whole baton smack down, even if done properly (major muscle groups), it “looks violent”. People don’t want to see police kicking in the nuts or punching, that looks abusive. Several officers piling on top of someone gets reported as abuse, plus affects the breathing of the suspect. Shooting causes some serious issues too. Can’t run them over with a cruiser, because that would possibly maim or kill them. Some of you complaining are just totally out of touch. The Taser has been tested by independent medical professionals more than just about any other option the police have http://www.taser.com/research-and-safety/science-and-medical/medical

    Please read up on the thousands of pages. Learn about the voltage vs. amps. My guess is excited delirium, yes, based on inside knowledge. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excited_delirium

    It’s also a fact anyone now believed to be under the influence of bath salts, if that is the case, needs to be transported to the hospital in ALL CASES, not jail. Same with someone in a mental illness if believed to be suicidal.

    So, for those complaining it is the Taser’s fault. Want the police to hit with clubs, punch, kick, spray ( https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/195739.pdf ) or offer a teddy bear and lollypop and continue to ask nicely?

    I’ve been hit with a Taser for the full 5 seconds, and sprayed. I’d rather be Tasered.

    • Tom Brown III

       thanks for supplying all these links so I didnt have to! I have gone through independent taser training and it was interesting and en-lighting. A lot of anti-police propaganda out there. I am never a fan of abuse of power or misuse of force but that isn’t the question in justified legal uses of the taser the results have shown by a landside it is a safe and effective means of subduing a suspect and gaining compliance.

      • Anonymous

         To my knowledge, one death was ruled caused by a Taser and it is being appealed, due to other medical issues. You’re welcome!

    • Tom Brown III

       and yes give me the 5 second ride anytime.

  • Anonymous

    Jeez who would have thought zapping people with high voltage was a bad idea?

  • jeff williams

    you make your bed, sleep in it.  the police dont need to babysit “recreational drug users” and “a guy with mental issues”
    Sounds like parents screwed up

  • Davida Willette

    i feel very sorry for this guy for his mental health issues for his drug issues. for that fact he got tazered if it wasnt for the cuts in mental health that wouldnt have happened. not very good the ER should have notified next of kin listed in ER . that is a BIG NONO that is their fault especially in a life and death situation that he was in. very big NONO. his father was listed as next of kin. i feel sorry for his family. i condemm the cuts in mainecare. if they hadnt made the cuts he may still be alive. you are going get more issues like his as long as there are cuts in mainecare. Tazers should be outlawed by the way 

    • Anonymous

      “Taser” and replaced with what? And the cuts in mental health made him a drug user? Huh? Drink the Kool aid

      • Davida Willette

        the cuts in mental health less people out there to help people like him is what i meant 

  • Anonymous

    Maybe the police/EMMC did the poor guy a favor. How many of us will go so easily?

    • Davida Willette

      they should have notified the father. they had his phone number

      • Anonymous

        You are right, of course.

    • Anonymous

      That’s the most sick remark I have ever read.

      • Anonymous

        I agree with you, its odd the Bangor daily is not removing comments that are real rude, one commenter on here says i have a record and im bitter.  He or she dont know me, but Bangor daily leaves that comment up, 

  • Andy Dufresne

    my first thoughts when bangor comes to mind anymore

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHsXc9o87ak&feature=youtu.be

    • Anonymous

      Please leave then.

      • Anonymous

        Are you always so negative, if you like the cops so much go hang out with them, you might already do.  Some of them care about us, some dont, i can mention four in Bangor force but i will not

        • Anonymous

          Oh i’m sure you can. It clear youre bitter towards them.

          • Anonymous

            And you tell me why you protect them so much, clear and only one reason, you call them on a daily basis to report a crime or someone doing something stupid.  Get a job and move on

          • Anonymous

            Oh how silly you’d look if you knew what I do. 

          • Anonymous

            I can tell you this you spend way too much time on the internet, maybe you should be in school where children belong

          • Anonymous

            My last comment in this silly little conversation. That makes no sense coming from someone who comments more frequently. And its no secret your record or families record is why you’re so bitter.  I will not respond to you again so feel free to vent it out without fear of a response.

          • Anonymous

            Thank god you wont comment to me again, your getting real annoying with your dumb comments 

          • Anonymous

            Oh and for your information my family nor me have a record, i would appreciate a apology from you

  • Anonymous

    Cincinnati police revises Use of Force Policy, specifically with use of TasersRead more: http://www.wcpo.com/dpp/news/local_news/Cincinnati-police-revises-Use-of-Force-Policy-specifically-with-use-of-Tasers#ixzz277bdcHc1

    I was not there so its difficult for me to form an opinion. I hope protocol was followed.
     At least there is a case review.
    Condolences to the family. Does this mean everyone under the influence of bath salts will be tased?
    He obviously suffered from mental illness.He was well known to the community.  Where was the mental health team, Act team and of the like.  Its a shame this situation escalated  to the  point of needing a taser. 

  • Anonymous

    First off the police had no responsibility to nitify next of kin he died five days later.. They don’t call mommy and daddy everytime they take some one to the hospital.. Secondly the only information the public has is through this article. The article is based off of his mothers angry testimony that is completely biased and a select few facts that the AG has handed out to make the newspaper happy. As much as all of the arm chair detectives would like to think you know what youre talking about you don’t, put your pitchfork down and wait for the results to come back.

    • I would certainly hope that if I was ever in a coma, that someone would contact my next of kin or emergency contact!  This isn’t just about calling mommy and daddy!

      • Anonymous

        Im more sticking up for the police.. They dropped him off therefore custody was transferred because he was not charges or arrested. 

      • Anonymous

        No since of commenting back to BangorNorth, they seem to know more, if i have a feeling they are cop lovers and call the cops on a daily basis since they are sticking up for them

    • Davida Willette

      that is the hospitals job to notify. they had next of kin phone number

    • Anonymous

      by the way its notify, incase you did not know

  • Anonymous

    Think the police officer did wrong or overreacted by using a tazer?

    Next time an out of control individual is occurring in your neighborhood,  take your A55 to the scene  and try sweet talking the out of control individual to calm down. Odds are your A55 will be hitting the ground and some of your teeth will be on the ground next to you on the ground.

  • Anonymous

    My condolences to the family of this young man.  There appears to be no acceptable reason why his father was not notified.
     
    Now Close the Methadone clinics. Why is it Bangor a city of 30,000 people has three methadone clinics and Portland a city of 62,000 has only one methadone clinic.  These clinics draw drug abusers to the area and where there are drug abusers there are drug dealers. 
    At last nights briefing in Bangor it was disclosed the Dominicans dealing in Bangor were earning as much as $10,000.00 a day.  Why should Bangor be the facilitator of that lucrative a business and the local citizens be asked to pick up the price tag in increased police, fire, and subsistence assistance?

    • HowdyNeighbor

      Bangor residents also have to deal with increased crime, decreased safety, decreased quality of living and decreased property values. Thanks, Bangor City Council, for turning Bangor into a slum town!

  • Davida Willette

    the biggest thing that gets me of this whole case is EMMC ER knowing how critical he was. had his father as next of kin . did NOT call his father to let him know. that is very very wrong. even if he is mentally ill or on drugs like bathsalts. his family should had been notified of the critical nature of his illness weather or not it was caused from the bathsalts or the tazer. the tazer in combination with the bathsalts if that is what it was. the family should have been notified they had his dads number .

  • Anonymous

     I keep reading what else could have been done and maybe this is what was done, we just don’t know yet:

    Level 1. Officer Presence: The officer is on scene in uniform, or displaying proper identification to indicate to the suspect that he/she is in contact with a law enforcement officer. This includes verbal identification by the officer.
    Level 2. Verbal Direction/Commands: Verbal communication between the officer and suspect where the officer gives the suspect a lawful order to perform a specific act. The officer may use a soft assisting touch when directing.
    Level 3. Physical Control: Wrist locks and “transporters”, distraction and take down techniques, pain compliance measures, and chemical agents/O-C spray may be used by the officer to physically control the suspect. An increase in the level of resistance by the suspect struggling may cause the officer to respond with empty hand strikes to the suspect. These strikes should be directed toward areas such as motor points, which are likely to assist in gaining compliance. Examples of empty hand strikes are vertical punches, shin kicks, and knee spikes.
    Level 4. Intermediate Level: The officer applies a baton, stun gun, or flashlight (used as an impact weapon) to control the suspect.
    Level 5. Incapacitation Control: The officer employs techniques, such as a strike to a major nerve area, with or without an impact weapon, with the intent to stun, temporarily disable, or render a suspect temporarily unconscious. Incapacitating strikes may have moderate potential for physical harm. The officer discharges a less lethal firearm containing less lethal munitions.

  • Davida Willette

    i have a question was he Tazered at the scene or the hospital. the cops are allowed to use Tazers at the hospital for unruly patients and visitors in the ER area 

  • Anonymous

    We ought to be able to tazer the lawmakers on a regular basics for passing tazer laws.

  • Anonymous

    I would tend to look into the drugs he takes, if he wasnt so unruley he wouldnt of been tazed…

  • Anonymous

    Condolences to this young mans family and friends. May they find answers that can bring them some peace.

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