September 25, 2017
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Comments for: Former Poland High cheerleader suing school, coach after suffering concussion during practice

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  • Anonymous

    Don’t parents sign waivers when their kids do sports, saying the know the risks involved?

    • Anonymous

      Gee, who would have thought that there is some inherent risk in being tossed in the air and hopefully being caught by a bunch of teenagers.

      Yep, let’s sue somebody….pathetic.

      • Anonymous

        I’m surprised she didn’t sue the poor kid who “failed” to catch her.

        • Anonymous

          Thats next for people like her and her parents.

    • What I’m reading here is that the cheerleaders were unsupervised during part of practice, specifically when the incident causing the injury occurred, and that the coach did not stop practice or properly care for her injuries.  As a teacher and former coach it is drilled into us to never leave students and athletes unsupervised.  So the point being argued isn’t one of being unaware of the dangers of cheering or the parents failing to sign a waiver, but instead was the coach (and therefore the school) negligent her duties.

      • Anonymous

        I know. But at some point, she’s going to have to face these questions from the defense attorney. It’s not always the fault of one person when an accident happens. Sometimes we take risks and get hurt. That could have happened if the students assisting in this stunt “failed” to do it properly, or the injured girl “failed” to do her part to prevent being dropped. Everyone might share some blame.

      • Anonymous

        Cary, why don’t you just run to her lawyer and agree to help in this case of stupidity.  Glad to see that you claim you are a former coach, now if you were a former teacher, we could rest that there is one less person like you around encouraging children to sue.

      • Anonymous

        No, what you’re reading is what the parents claim.  That doesn’t mean it actually happened the way they’re claiming in the suit.  This is a trial lawyer’s tactic- I think it’s called “deep pockets”.  They sue anybody and everybody even remotely involved, with the hope of striking it rich.

    • Anonymous

      Bravo! If you want your kids to be safe, make them join the Chess Team.

      • Anonymous

        Right, and I say ban cheerleading around the nation, there could be other imbeciles out there waiting to sue.

      • Jake_OO7

        They might get carpal tunnel syndrome.  

    • Anonymous

      Probably do, but the parents are the kind of people who are unable to accept their child’s behavior, so blame someone else.

  • Anonymous

    so basically she’s suing because she messed up a move and hurt herself? someone should have told her cheering is a dangerous sport. Go figure….

    • Anonymous

      How did she mess up was you there to watch it ?

      • Anonymous

        You’ve got some serious grammar issues, my friend.

        • Anonymous

          is that all u have to complain about an i know why u r doing it because u have no come back  nice try i c right thru u 

          • Anonymous

            I rest my case.

          • Anonymous

            Please and thank you for resting your case, you “better-than-thou” types should do more of that.

        • Anonymous

          Punctuation, too.

          • Anonymous

            Well yeah.. that too.  I guess I was lumping the two together, which is technically incorrect.

          • Anonymous

            Tsk Shame on you. ;-)

          • Anonymous

            I’m embarrassed.

          • Anonymous

            I doubt that you are embarrassed, you are too perfect for that.

          • Anonymous

            Oh God, we have a perfect person amongst us.  Excuse us poor human beings for making mistakes in grammar and punctuation, you better sue us for not being as perfect as you are.  How do you live with yourself in a less than perfect world?  I feel bad for you having to live with us mortals.  Oh, and by the way, every night please kneel at your bed and thank God you do not have to live around me, you would not be a happy person.

          • Anonymous

            Oh, man, do you have me pegged…..
            Also, I want to thank you for seeking out all of the comments I wrote yesterday and leaving 7 replies with your feedback on me as a person – because you clearly know me all too well.
            Have a pleasant day.

      • szyq43

        Wow really?? Was you there…. & all they would do away with throwing people there feet…. It seems to me you have no idea what you’re writing. Your comments don’t make much sense.

        • Anonymous

          After a couple of years, you learn to decipher it;)

          • szyq43

            Oh that’s good to know:) LOL  Love the name!!!

      • Anonymous

        I did.  She messed up.

    • Anonymous

      If she gets one penny all schools should ban cheerleading at once and forever.

      • Anonymous

        You have no idea what you  are taking about  all they would do is do away with throwing people there feet would be on the ground

        • Anonymous

          Yeah, then you could get your feet back on the ground and look around at where you are.  Put your dope away for a couple days and think about this suit.

      • Mr_Spuddy

         Even if she DOESN’T get a penny, all schools should ban cheerleading . . .

  • We are seeing the beginning of the end for all contact sports now that the “nanny state” and its roving bands of hungry lawyers realize that someone might get hurt.

    • Anonymous

      We are fast approaching the “bubble wrap” solution that has been mentioned on the BDN before. Let’s wrap ’em up and plunk them in front of the TV playing video games. If the power goes out then sue Bangor Hydro…..
       
      There will not be many other options for children or parents  if these stupid lawsuits continue and gain momentum.

      • Anonymous

        How right you are Mikey!  When I played football I broke 2 bones,was concussed, have knee and back problems to this day from contact and unsupervised weight training.  I wouldn’t change a bleepin’ think.  The “wussification” of America is in full swing, perpetuated by unscrupulous lawyers and the “save us from ourselves” nanny state.  I wonder how the ultra-left, who are always wanting more $ for schools, will react when the schools payout huge lawsuits all in the name of the nanny state they’ve helped create.  Ironic isn’t it? 

    • Anonymous

      It’s not a matter of who is “at fault” so much as that these activities have a very high probability of incurring lasting injuries to the students, and without guidelines the effects can be worsened (as when a student returns to competition/practice before the concussion heals, then gets hit again). Think of it: how many kids have been robbed of their futures as they planned them due to a traumatic brain injury incurred during high school sports, that was handled inappropriately by coaches? Brain injuries can have a permanent effect on a student’s ability to stay on track academically, or merely to function. They can lead to depression, suicide, inability to hold a job, memory loss, mood changes, violent eruptions, and the list goes on. This is SERIOUS business, unlike some other injuries incurred playing sports that may be somewhat disabling but the intellect and ability to function is preserved.

      The adults, coaches and peers all keep each other “pumped”, encouraging more and more hazardous behavior all in the name of the school’s and students’ glory. Shouldn’t there be some restrictions on activities that are inherently dangerous? Football, hockey, and soccer head injuries all can also diminish participants’ IQ and potential. While the other team members move on with their lives, the brain injured teen is left trying to cope with the most basic tasks. Is the collective glory really worth the loss of many individual students’ health and safety as well as their potential?!

      • Anonymous

        Then don’t do it! Just don’t do it! Parents should not allow their kids to do these activities if they are dangerous! You can get hurt. You can even die! Why take the risk if you know it could happen? Exactly who is responsible if a kid gets hurt doing this? Coaches? Schools? That’s just the craziest thing I’ve ever heard. Noone is responsible but yourself and your parents. Another frivilous lawsuit.

      • Anonymous

        Sports are voluntary.

        Case closed.

  • Anonymous

    Seems like they are covering all bases. If they lose against the school they might as well try to get some money from Mr. Beking. These are people I wouldn’t want any where near me.

    • Anonymous

      Agree. What stupidity.  Couldn’t they have thrown in a “slip & fall” in a parking lot for good measure? 

      • Anonymous

        That is next, probably at Hannaford Brothers parking lot, they are not done yet.

  • Anonymous

    Cheerleaders don’t lead cheers anymore. They should.

  • Anonymous

    This story makes me so mad. They want to blame a personal  injury on another person and they are suing everyone they know to try and get some money. WOW, this epitomizes the mess this country is in. When people don’t take responsibility for their own actions and they want to blame other people and they want those people to pay for everything!

    Give me a B, give me a R, give me an E, give me an A, give me a K. what does it spell??

    • Anonymous

      were you there to see what was going on was ALL safety process followed ??

      •  I am sorry wolly but I have to agree with many of the other people on here.  It is a risk when playing sports… Many people end up with concussions from sports… I bet all cheerleaders that get thrown in the air end up on the floor at some point in their practices… Not all the time but I’m sure it happens to all flying cheerleaders at some point… Its a risk…

        •  These will be the kind of people whom complain about insurance rates and costs of sports etc.  Perhaps the cost is so high because of all the people that are money hungry… If there weren’t so many people out there quick to jump on the train to sue everyone they can perhaps things would be more affordable…

          • Anonymous

            No its not because of that sports are dangrious an cheering is dangerious to way they do it

          • Anonymous

             get a spelling and grammar checker…

          • Yawningattrolls

            He’s a troll – ignore him; he does this on this forum all the time for his kicks

          • Anonymous

            Another expert on life and liberty.  Don’t be a cheerleader until you have gotten permission from wollydevil.

        • Anonymous

          Now tell all of us how she mess up   please  ? Cheering is not a sport the courts has all ready decided that

          • Anonymous

            What does it matter who messed up. When someone participates in an activity that can be dangerous, they have to accept the inherent risks. They have to take responsibility for their own actions.

            People like these are the reason I had to fence my yard, (which was a well used shortcut by the neighborhood kids), lest I get sued if one of them gets hurt.

            This lawsuit stinks of greed.

          • Anonymous

            No it not her fault if the spotters were not trained how to do there job she put her life in there hands  . was the coach qualified to teach them the dangerous moves  ? What collage did she go to ,to learn the dangerous moves an how to teach them  ?

          • Anonymous

            That’s what they practice for, to get better. I am quite sure if they had no clue as to what they were doing, there would be quite a few more injuries.

            Cheering does not require a “collage” degree, as far as I know.

            Your naivety in this issue is amazing.

          • Anonymous

            try reading this agen was the coach qualified to teach them the dangerous moves ? What collage did she go to ,to learn the dangerous moves an how to teach them ?

          • Anonymous

            stupid is as stupid writes

            wollydevil is stupid

          • Anonymous

            Se you have no come back so you say this stupid saying

          • Anonymous

            What?  Decipher that for us will you.

          • szyq43

            LOL Every comment I have read from wollydevil lacks any kind of sense. “Try reading this agen(again) is prob what you meant. “Dangerous moves an…” and I could go on with pretty much every comment this person has made.

          • Anonymous

            I got my collage degree in 1st grade.. glued a bunch of pictures of athletes to a piece of construction paper.  One of my prouder moments.

          • Anonymous

            Indeed, that should make up for your earlier embarrassment. :-P

          • Anonymous

            Hey, good idea.. All I have to do to feel better is go make a college… I mean collage

          • Anonymous

            On the glue again huh.

          • Anonymous

            I bet you have had quite a few proud moments in your life so far, now stop smelling that glue you use and get back down to earth with us mortals.

          • Guest

          • Anonymous

            The “collage” of hard knocks, plus extra courses of being around you.

          •  She obviously was the flyer and the people below dropped her… Mistakes happen and im sure it was not intentional right?? I have a son that had surgery the surgeon definately made his mistakes and I never sewed… Without the dr there would have been no hope in the first place… I thank them for doing all they did and saving my sons life in the end…

      • Anonymous

        No, but you will remind us, I am sure, that you know what is happening and the rest of us are just using up breathing space.

  • Anonymous

    As the years go by, it seems like the focus of cheering is less on the school’s basketball team and more on performing dangerous stunts with nothing but a hardwood floor to land on.  I wish they would just get back to basics and stop allowing these young, vulnerable girls to put themselves at risk for no other reason than to provide a “Wow” factor.  Who’s in charge here, anyway – the parents and coaches or the kids?

  • Anonymous

    Perhaps it’s time to take a hard look at what cheer leading has become. In some-not all programs- these young ladies seem no know little about the game they are cheering about. I’ve watched football games where you knew that some had no idea what was going on, but did push ups every time something “good” happened. Gymnastics is a terrific sport for young men and women. Cheering should be about revving up the crowd and supporting the athletes-boys and girls-on the field, court or diamond.

  • Anonymous

    Might I suggest the family sue Isaac Newton for his universal law of gravitation and laws of motion.  It is really his fault…

    • Anonymous

      Well played, sir… Well played.

    • Kevin_Of_Bangor

      Please don’t give them any ideas. 

    • Guest

  • Anonymous

    Looks like 2010 was a bad year for her.

  • Anonymous

    This is ridiculous.

    • Anonymous

      Much like you are.

  • Anonymous

    I’m sure her mother was there cheering for her cheerleader.. Most likely her mother incouraged her to join the squad, mommie needed to tell her friends that her daughter was a cheerleader.. Just cancel cheerleading today… Next we will call texting while walking a sport.

  • Anonymous

    She might as well sue the makers of the cheer leading outfit as well…….OMG…..Sue McDonalds because they ate there after practice.

  • Anonymous

    sue happy?

  • Anonymous

    Didn’t I read a little while ago that the courts said cheerleading wasn’t a sport?

    • Anonymous

      Yes you are right on that .

  • Anonymous

    Let’s give all the cheerleaders helmets….oy.

  • PabMainer

    So actually, there are two different lawsuits being pursued here…..the one for the cheerleading “accident” and another unrelated MVA that occured in Portland 3 months later……Crazy…..

    • Anonymous

      Anything to increase the odds of an enormous payout.

      • Anonymous

        She must need $$ for college!

  • Davida Willette

    funny thing is none of these people making these posts would be making these posts if she was their daughter in this situation

    • I am not a parent, but I know that there are risks that are involved with playing sports.  I would not sue over this.  It was a risk and she got hurt.

      • Davida Willette

        if a squad wants to win a cheerleading compettition they have to up the difficulty on their stunts and tumbling to compete against other squads that increases safety risks . they have to sell their routine to the judges. people should look at a competition score sheet. this is what the squads all work for for these compettitions . notice at competitions. they have a floor matt. that is for safety during mounting and tumbling

      • Davida Willette

        i know that. the thing is if a squad wants to win in competition they have to add difficulty to stunting and tumbling. they have special cheering camps for this also to teach safety. also there are cheering gyms in certain locations that teach this . 

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, I hope her parents don’t see any of these comments.. They’ll sue every last one of us.

    • Anonymous

      No, because I would not be bringing these lawsuits to court!

  • Davida Willette

    in order to be a winner in cheerleading competition like lewiston hermon for example the more difficult the stunting and tumbling the higher the score. poland spring was one of the better western maine squads. unfortunately  the higher the risk of things that could happen. everyone one loves a winner. safety should also be a concern on more difficult stunting. in spite of safety accidents do happen.  right now Hermon is sitting on top of class B and Lewiston on top of class A. they get rewarded for more difficult stunting and tumbling . they are your favorites  people have to up their stunting to bring these powerheads down

    • Anonymous

      Fascinating.

  • I’m confused – are they blaming the school, the car accident, or both ??  I feel bad for her, but I don’t understand what the school accident and a car accident have to do with each other and why they’re in the same complaint.  I’ve worked in the legal field – sounds like 2 law suits to me.

    • Anonymous

      We’re all confused, Paul.. 

      • Anonymous

        Boy have you got that right, at least about yourself.

  • Anonymous

    School sports are not what they used to be. They have become so fanatic about pushing the limits that basic safety concerns are often brushed under the rug, and this has to stop. Coaches have a responsibility toward their kids and need to be well-trained to handle things they might come up against, not just winning. I have seen it happen more than once when during a basketball game a kid gets a hard hit to the head by falling on the floor, yet they go back and continue to play the game later on. One in particular in high school boys b-ball, their 6’5″ center was all but knocked unconscious, left the court with help, went out back for a while with the trainer, yet still came back to play in the second half of that same game. That kid NEVER should have been sent back into that game. So it’s not just cheering or sports with helmets, it’s all the sports that carry the risk, and the ones guiding those kids need to have the presence of mind to look out for the well-being players more, and worry less about only winning. This story is not a new one, just one that got published in the paper. Just google the terms school sports concussions and you’ll get a ton of supporting information. 

    • Anonymous

      So.. wouldn’t that be the trainer’s fault, not the coach?  If he was seriously hurt, the trainer should have told the coach he can’t go back in.

  • Anonymous

    Even though I can sympathize with the young lady and hopefully she will fully recover, she and her parents should have known that, as with any physical activity there is a possibility of an accident or injury.

    My Grandfather had a good saying …………………………… If you enjoy the pleasures, you accept the liabilities.

    Of course I don’t think it helps any that Attorneys can advertise on TV to bring law suits for just about anything.

  • EB

    Let me think of an example…Should I sue my parents because I fell off my bike? They did teach me how to ride it and let me go out on my own with it. I did make the decision ride my bike in the first place but why should I be at fault?! In regard to the article she sounds extremely accident prone. Some people just are. Maybe she should remain at home with mom and dad. $10Mil? Ha! Good luck trying to make that as a math professor regardless.

  • Anonymous

    Too much liability with sports for schools now so do away with them.Foot ball head and neck  trauma, concussions during soccer no more!!  Maybe the insurances will go down and our taxes. Being sarcastic but some truth to the issue if the sueing continues.  

  • Anonymous

    And people wonder why our kids are not allowed to do …well…ANYTHING any more.

  • Anonymous

    Absolute nonsense. TORT REFORM NOW!

  • Anonymous

    If cheerleading is a sport then the participant, with parental permission if a minor, takes a known risk of injury as aprt of participation. But, if cheerleading isn’t a sport, then perhaps a higher level of care and caution is owed which would no doubt have to include eliminating all the risky gymnastics and tumbling. Never saw a cheerleader with more than a raspy throat for an injury back in the 50’s and 60’s-

    • Anonymous

      Its not a sport the court has all ready said that

    • Anonymous

      hahaha.. that’s a good one, mayor

  • Davida Willette

    one more thing for safety. they could always start a non mounting division which would be dance and tumbling some states have that 

    • Anonymous

      You’re always so chock full of great ideas…………

      • Davida Willette

        yah i am. i live in a town who once had a great cheering squad but right now they are struggling that is bucksport. they need a new coach who is progressive up and up. not afraid of stunting and tumbling difficulty get the girls to cheering camp to a cheering gym. preach safety. fund raising they need a coach who has been susccessful in compettition.  safety should be preached 

  • Anonymous

    You will see that injuries in sports from junior high an up  the injury rate is way up no just in Maine but all over the USA an they see more  ( Hospitals an rehab centers an Dr. offices )  each year so what dose that tell you  ?

  • Anonymous

    Wow. Cheerleading can be dangerous. Who’da thunk it?

    2 lawsuits for different acts. Sounds to me as if they’re sue happy and are looking for $$$

  • Anonymous

    Despicable, greedy money grab. Nothing more. They assume the insurance company will settle for big bucks, and they’ll be on the gravy train. I was seriously hurt playing football in high school, and my family would NEVER have considered a law suit. Times have changed, and everyone is out for themselves, including this family. This case is disgusting, and I hope the greedy Doyers get nothing.

  • Anonymous

    It’s Bush’s fault!

    • Anonymous

      and i was reading this paper because i was tired of portland PH saying that about everything

  • Anonymous

    Parents do indeed have to sign waivers for kids to play any type of sport.  The part that bothers me is that these girls were cheering without the coach present? I read that in comments, is that true? If so, an actual lawsuit is probably valid.

  • As i cheerleader myeself, i am going to say the girls should not have been stunting without the supervision of their coach. High school students are mature & smart enough to know that at least.. Also, i may as well add that cheerleading is the top most dangerous sport there is, above football and all others. These girls knew what was expected of them when joining the squad. there is no reason to sue the school or the coach for a stupid misjudgement on this girls behalf. She should have been taking the sport more seriously, and this could have been prevented. On that note, i have been dropped many times from stunts, basket tosses included, i’ve been on crutches and had broken bones and bad bruises.. it comes with the territory, but its not a joke. Never stunt without a coach present.

    • Anonymous

      The “top most dangerous sport” is cheering? Intriguing. I’d like to hear the rationale behind that one.

      • Look it up. im not making it up.. I have cheered since i was 10 years old… I am now 22 and i cheer for 2 all start teams, and I coach a youth team. We have some of the most difficult things to do, and we have to smile and force ourselves to make it all look easy. We do it with grace and style and attitude, throw people in the air, or get thrown ourselves. fit every possible move and stunt we can, into a 3 minute routine. Please underestimate cheerleading one more time, i would love to continue this discussion with such a narrow minded prick.

        • Anonymous

          Yeah, ok. Show me the information you’re referring to that says cheering is the most dangerous sport on the planet. I’m really interested to see it.

          But you won’t provide it, because it doesn’t exist. 

          Not sure what’s more scary – the fact you actually BELIEVE that cheering is the most dangerous sport, or the fact you’re an adult cheerleader.

          • i’m 22…. that hardly means i am an adult cheerleader. I am in college. And participating in a college level sport, if putting me down makes you feel better, that’s pathetic really. Look it up online. there are many articles about cheerleading being one of the most dangerous sports out there. Why so quick to say otherwise? I’m sure a cheerleader turned you down way back when you were in high school and you’re probably taking it out on all of us now. Don’t judge the sport unless you have participated

          • an article on ABC states:

            Cheerleading has long been an iconic American pastime, and it is now more popular than ever. By one estimate, 3 million young people cheer, more than 400,000 at the high school level. And cheerleaders are no longer only on the sidelines — many cheer competitively.
            The degree of difficulty of cheer stunts has exploded. So too has the number of accidents.
            ABC News 
            Cheerleading emergency room visits have increased almost sixfold over the past three decades. There were nearly 30,000 in 2008, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
            The numbers are all the more disturbing because some states don’t even recognize cheerleading as a sport. That means there are no uniform safety measures and training methods.
            Kori Johnson is the cheerleading coach at Costa Mesa High School in Southern California. She says the cheerleaders have had to step up the degree of difficulty over the years.
            “The girls, they want to be the best,” said Johnson. “They want to try harder stunts. So every year when we see new stunts we try them.”

            Cheerleading as Competition
            Costa Mesa High boasts a championship cheer squad.
            Squad members say people who don’t think cheerleading is a sport should just try it.
            “They should be open-minded about it,” one cheerleader said. “We throw people. Like our bases are lifting like people up in the air.”
            “It’s like bench-pressing a person,” a second cheerleader said.
            A third cheerleader said not everyone could keep up.
            “We had the water polo boys stunt with us last year and they like, quit, after like an hour,” she said. “They said it was really intense.”

    • Anonymous

      High School students are mature and smart enough.  What a joke that is.

      • what i said before you twisted my words, was that high school students are smart enough to know that they shouldnt be doing dangerous stunts without a coach present. If they’re participating in the sport, then they should know the do’s and dont’s

  • Anonymous

    Approximately 3.5 million children and adolescents ages 14 and younger get hurt annually playing sports or participating in recreational activities.
    Although death from a sports injury is rare, the leading cause of death from a sports-related injury is a brain injury.
    Sports and recreational activities contribute to approximately 21 percent of all traumatic brain injuries among American children and adolescents.
    The majority of head injuries sustained in sports or recreational activities occur during bicycling, skateboarding, or skating incidents.
    More than 775,000 children and adolescents ages 14 and younger are treated in hospital emergency rooms for sports-related injuries each year. Most of the injuries occurred as a result of falls, being struck by an object, collisions, and overexertion during unorganized or informal sports activities.Where and when:Playground, sports, and bicycle-related injuries occur most often among young children, between the ages of 5 and 14 years old. Bicycle- and sports-related injuries also affect older children and adolescents, in addition to overexertion.
    The highest rates of injury occur in sports that involve contact and collisions.
    More severe injuries occur during individual sports and recreational activities.
    Most organized sports-related injuries (62 percent) occur during practice.Who:More than 30 million high school children participate in organized sports.
    Children between 5 and 14 years of age account for almost half (40 percent) of sports-related injuries for all age groups.
    More than 775,000 children participating in sports activities are injured each year, and one in four injuries is considered serious.
    Children who are less developed than a more mature child of the same age and weight are at increased risk for injury.
    Sports-related injury severity increases with age.
    Before puberty, girls suffer more sports injuries than boys.
    During puberty, boys suffer more injuries more severely than girls.
    Children who are just beginning a sport or activity are at greater risk for injury.Types of sports and recreational activitiesConsider these estimated injury statistics for 2009 from the Consumer Product Safety Commission:Basketball. More than 170,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for basketball-related injuries.Baseball and softball. Nearly 110,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for baseball-related injuries. Baseball also has the highest fatality rate among sports for children ages 5 to 14, with three to four children dying from baseball injuries each year.Bicycling. More than 200,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for bicycle-related injuries.Football. Almost 215,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for football-related injuries, with nearly 10,000 of those hospitalized as a result of their injuries.Ice hockey. More than 20,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for ice hockey-related injuries.In-line and roller skating. More than 47,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for in-line skating-related injuries.Skateboarding. More than 66,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for skateboarding-related injuries, with more than 4,500 children hospitalized as a result of their injuries.Sledding/toboggan. More than 16,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for sledding-related injuries.Snow skiing/snowboarding. More than 25,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for snow boarding and snow skiing-related injuries.Soccer. About 88,000 children ages 5 to 14 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for soccer-related injuries.Trampolines. About 65,000 children ages 14 and under were treated in hospital emergency rooms for trampoline-related injuries.

  • Lionel Marquis

    From some of the posts I’ve seen, some people should spend less time on after school activities and more time on their English classes.

  • Anonymous

    What came first – sports or cheering?

  • Brittney Benson

    Being a cheerleader for 19 years and a FORMER Poland Regional High School cheerleader i have had my share of “blows to the head” doesn’t mean i went around suing every coach i had, its known as a dangerous sport. Whether you are tumbling, flying or basing you are bound to get hurt, trust me I’ve done them all. So obviously these people just want to sue everyone in sight for ridiculous reasons. Clearly they have problems especially since they sued the town of Mechanic Falls not long ago.

    Note to everyone, stay away from this family!

    This is the problem with today’s society and why everyone else loses out because everyone trying to get something out of nothing.

  • Anonymous

    I get the point that the coach “failed” to watch this young woman being tossed in the air. But I’m sure the school obtained her and her parents’ consents before allowing her to be treated like a basket ball. Sometimes balls are dropped. If you want to participate in dangerous games and other athletic hijinks, you have to expect to be hurt now and again. And it won’t always the kind of injury that gets better with a bandaid and an ice pack.

  • Anonymous

    The insurance companies will end sports as we know it, all because of one person and greed.

  • Anonymous

    I wonder how they will be able to prove whether it was the cheerleading stunt or the car accident that caused her alleged injuries.

  • Anonymous

    Parents and a child trying to stick it to the world for an accident that took place because she volunteered to be a cheerleader.  Here Olive Oyl, cheer this, hope you lose big time and there goes your reputation.  

  • Anonymous

    Seems that there are overlapping injuries here, with overlapping lawsuits.  Parents do sign a paper stating their children can participate in sports and that they understand the risks involved.  But, if the coach was not in the room and supervising during the entire practice, then it would seem she holds responsibility for that practice.

  • Anonymous

    All tosses should be banned… Sooner or later, accidents will happen when you toss someone in the air….!!!  Use your head not hurt it…

  • For high school girls and college women, cheerleading is far more dangerous than any other sport, according to a new report that adds several previously unreported cases of serious injuries to a growing list.High school cheerleading accounted for 65.1 percent of all catastrophic sports injuries among high school females over the past 25 years, according to an annual report released Monday by the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research.
    The new estimate is up from 55 percent in last year’s study. The researches say the true number of cheerleading injuries appears to be higher than they had previously thought. And these are not ankle sprains. The report counts fatal, disabling and serious injuries.

    The statistics are equally grim in college, where cheerleading accounted for 66.7 percent of all female sports catastrophic injuries, compared to the past estimate of 59.4 percent.
    The revised picture results from a new partnership between the sports injury center and the National Cheer Safety Foundation, a California-based not-for-profit body created to promote safety in cheerleading and collect data on injuries. The foundation provided the center with previously unreported data. The new data added 30 injury records from high schoolers and college students to the 112 in last year’s report.
    Catastrophic injuries to female athletes have increased over the years, since the first report was published in 1982.
    “A major factor in this increase has been the change in cheerleading activity, which now involves gymnastic-type stunts,” said Dr. Frederick O. Mueller, lead researcher on the new report and a professor of exercise and sports science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “If these cheerleading activities are not taught by a competent coach and keep increasing in difficulty, catastrophic injuries will continue to be a part of cheerleading.”
    Less than catastrophic injuries are vastly more common and they occur at much younger ages, too. Children ages 5 to 18 admitted to hospitals for cheerleading injuries in the United States jumped from 10,900 in 1990 to 22,900 in 2002, according to research published in the journal Pediatrics in 2006. The breakdown:
    Strains/sprains: 52.4 percentSoft tissue injuries: 18.4 percentFractures/dislocations: 16.4 percentLacerations/avulsions: 3.8 percentConcussions/closed head injuries: 3.5 percentOther: 5.5 percent
    The new report released Monday found that between 1982 and 2007, there were 103 fatal, disabling or serious injuries recorded among female high school athletes, with the vast majority (67) occurring in cheerleading. The next most dangerous sports: gymnastics (nine such injuries) and track (seven).
    Among college athletes, there have been 39 of these severe injuries: 26 in cheerleading, followed by three in field hockey and two each in lacrosse and gymnastics. The report also notes that according to the NCAA Insurance program, 25 percent of money spent on student athlete injuries in 2005 resulted from cheerleading.
    In 2007, however, two catastrophic injuries to female high school cheerleaders were reported, down from 10 in the previous season and the lowest number since 2001. Yet there were three catastrophic injuries to college-level participants, up from one in 2006.
    According to the report, almost 95,200 female students take part in high school cheerleading annually, along with about 2,150 males. College participation numbers are hard to find since cheerleading is not an NCAA sport.

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