Comments for: A natural gas solution

Posted Aug. 31, 2012, at 5:20 p.m.
Last modified Aug. 31, 2012, at 7:59 p.m.

Gov. Paul LePage is right to say Maine needs natural gas. But getting more of the clean-burning, affordable fuel into the state will require a continued long-term effort on the part of not just the government, but also businesses, industrial operations and residents. Natural gas pipeline networks are market-driven and …

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  • Anonymous

    Every single penny WASTED on corrupt wind power could be wisely invested to expand the NG infrastructure. Gas is a clean, efficient domestically produced energy source.

    • I agree.  Natural gas trumps industrial wind any day of the week.  Real dispatchable power and the real ability to “wean us off of foreign oil”.  We switched to natural gas in our business and have saved  60% in energy costs.  That’s huge.  

      • honey777

        I’m a fan of natural gas (much cleaner than oil), but I wonder if it will simply go the way of big oil and oil speculators inflating prices once people switch over.  The U.S. only gets a small fraction of its oil from overseas.  Most of the oil pumped in North America is exported because big oil can get higher prices elsewhere in the world. 
         We have plenty of oil right here.  How about some regulation that keeps more U.S. oil in the U.S.?

  • Anonymous

    While it is correct to indicate there is a shortage of natural gas distribution pipeline infrastructure in Maine, the first paragraph of the editorial implies there is a shortage of natural gas in Maine. That is incorrect.

    There is no shortage of natural gas flowing through the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline; otherwise, there would be no distribution pipeline expansion going on in the state. The Canaport LNG terminal is operating at only around 30% of capacity. If demand were greater, Canaport’s imports and output would be greater. The same can be said for the Everett LNG, Northeast Gateway, and Neptune LNG terminals in Massachusetts. Everett LNG’s output has been declining, and Northeast Gateway and Neptune virutually nonexistent, due to the vast sea of domestic natural gas on Maine’s doorstep.

    Natural gas pipeline infrastructure is currently being expanded to deliver more of the Marcellus Shale natural gas to the Northeast and New England. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s Office of Energy Projects just released their Natural Gas Highlights update for July, indicating nearly 1 billion cubic feet per day of additional capacity was either just placed into service or application filed. Over 30 new pipeline and pipeline expansion projects for the Northeast and New England have begun development or have been completed within the past year.

    • Anonymous

      Robert, you are confusing me. I was under the impression that you were dead set against LNG. Now it seems that you are promoting Irving Oils facility in Saint John, N. B..

      Is it just the thought of an American company in Washington County putting American citizens to work that upsets you?

      • Anonymous

        Thanks for this opportunity to clarify your misunderstanding.
         
        Save Passamaquoddy Bay has never taken a position opposing LNG, per se, as has been obvious in our filings to FERC, the Maine Board of Environmental Protection, my participation at the US Coast Guard’s invitation in their Waterway Suitability Assessment Committee, our news releases, op-ed articles, and online comments.
         
        We have advocated for years that Downeast LNG site at a location that complies with LNG industry terminal siting best practices (SIGTTO). Downeast LNG has refused. Save Passamaquoddy Bay’s opposition to Downeast LNG (and the other two local projects that were thrown out of permitting by FERC) has nothing to do with American jobs versus Canadian jobs, although project supporters try to make that an issue.
         
        Had Downeast LNG (or the other two failed proposals) followed its own industry’s advice, there might already be an LNG terminal in Washington County, although it — like Canaport LNG, Everett LNG, Northeast Gateway, and Neptune LNG — would now be suffering due to the vast abundance of domestic US natural gas sitting virtually on Maine’s doorstep.

  • Sewall House Yoga

    yes get rid of the awful wind scam that is ruining out beautiful State now please..
    see what the science writer says on the homepage of this website
    same thing happening here
    http://turbinesonfire.org

  • Anonymous

    If we had the Robbinston LNG maybe we could get natural gas to the homes in Robbinston, Perry ,Pembroke and Calais and the rest of the surrounding areas.

  • Anonymous

    It is imperative for all Mainers that intend to vote in November to do some research into the positions of all the candidates on Wind and Natural Gas for our state.  It is pretty clear that Angus King and any Democrat will continnue to support the Wind scam that has been foisted on us over the last four years.  Governor LePage and the Republican candidates have all called for a moritorium or at least slowing down the waste and corruption Wind has used to level our mountaintops, disrupt our wilderness, kill our wildlife and ruin our sense of tranquillity and beauty. 
    We as Mainers have a choice . . . do a little research for yourselves.  Find out how Industrial Wind does NOT contribute to clean energy.  Wind companies are planning to put up more than 2,500 more towers covering more than 900 miles of our mountaintops in Maine.  Our electric rates have already jumped between 12.5% and 19.8% to cover the “grid upgrade” to facilitate the turbines, an upgrade we really don’t need if we were to develop more stabile, reliable and continuious power.  We do have a choice!!!  We need serious people in our government that will ask questions, not just rubber stamp environmentalist BS.  Though Angus King has stepped down from his position at First Wind, he still has family involved and has taken huge sums of taxpayer cash for this folly.  Please be informed!

    • Anonymous

      Minor correction.  You say Angus King has stepped down from First Wind.  Angus King, who believes he alone will save the country by being Senator, was the principal in Independence Wind, which destroyed the mountains of Roxbury with the Record Hill Wind project.  But you were just confused about the family business of ripping off the taxpayers for the wind farce, as his son Angus S. King III is Vice President for Mergers and Acquisitions at First Wind.

    • Anonymous

      Can you point out which mountains have been destroyed? To my knowledge they are all still there. I don’t think they are strip mining for wind.

      • Anonymous

        The wind developers are strip mining our wallets.

        Google “What every Maine ratepayer needs to know”.

        • Anonymous

          Wind Power IS working for Walmart, maybe you should boycott them!
          http://finance.yahoo.com/news/walmart-introduces-industrial-wind-turbine-172300557.html

        • Anonymous

          Please answer the question. You anti-windpower people keep repeating that the mountains have been destroyed yet present no evidence of this.

          • Anonymous

            Take a ride to Mars Hill, the windmills are a wonderful addition!! Windpower is a joke anyway you look at it!

          • Anonymous

            Been there, the mountain is still there.

          • Anonymous

            How does it look?

  • Anonymous

    Hydro and natural gas are our future for the forseeable future for Maine.  Wind and solar have been exposed for the scams they are and shouldn’t even be part of the conversation.

    • Anonymous

      How do you feel about fracking and oil spills?  You can’t have a balanced conversation in support of any energy policy without also considering the downside of combustible fuels energy.

    • Anonymous

      “I’d put my money on the sun and solar energy.  What a source of power!  I hope we don’t have to wait to run out of coal and oil before we tackle that.”  -Thomas Edison 1931

      • Anonymous

        Yup, and 81 years later solar and wind are still a pipe dream for grid scale generation.   Recent studies out of Germany have shown that even with a 20 year head start on the US and with the world reknown engineering that Germany has,  their current massive wind power effort has resulted in only achieving 17% of the turbines’ nameplate capacity.  The laws of physics prohibit wind from ever being a reliable and worthwhile investment, and neither solar or wind will ever be a base load energy source.

      • Anonymous

        A simple residential hot water solar system would take somewhere around 13 years for payback, that is a fact. At this point and time solar is for the people with money that want to feel warm and fuzzy, that also is a fact!

        • Anonymous

          I had no idea!  I need to educate myself so I can be as smart as you! Do you have a link so I can start educating myself?  Thank you so much!

          • Anonymous

            You’re correct, you have no idea. Perhaps you could educate yourself before you comment again? No I will not give you a link, please find a link yourself it would be good practice for you..

          • Anonymous

            No link = Not verifiable
             Logically you or anyone has no idea how much energy costs will be in 3 to 5 years.

            Here you go no need to thank me this says 3 to 4 years:
            http://www.house-energy.com/Solar/Costs-Payback-Solar.htm 

          • Anonymous

            “The payback period for solar hot water applications is short for the simpler designs. In very favorable cases (associated to favorable climate conditions) 3 or 4 years paybacks are possible. In colder climates the paybacks can double those numbers.”

            Typical, google solar and post the first link that pops up. please post the negative ones as well. Nice try! As I said do your research and please don’t get you info from a manufacture or someone selling these systems when you do. 

            PS: I live in Maine…. Maine is not a “favorable case”. Good luck! 

  • Anonymous

    Natural gas powered electricity generation versus wind power is an absurd comparison.  In the Bangor Area, the “Maine Independence Station” is a 520 MW combined cycle gas fired generator, sitting on a 30 acre parcel.  The plant was built in 2000 for $300 million at a site that already had transmision lines.  It cranks out predictable, reliable megawatts 24/7 as a base load facility.  Unless you are looking for it, very few people see it tucked away on the river side in Veazie.

    To equal this output would mean 1800 wind turbines, sprawling over 300 miles of ridges that are blasted away and leveled.  50,000 acres would be clearcut.  Hundreds of miles of new transmission lines would criss cross the state like a spider web.  Cost would be more than $5 billion!  These projections are based on the impacts and costs of existing Maine wind projects.

    Everywhere we would go, the looming presense of turbines the height of Boston skyscrapers (Vestas V100 turbine:  479 ft tall; the tallest building in New England, Boston’s John Hancock tower:  790 ft. tall) will dominate the views of our beautiful state.  Lastly, the problem that plagues wind power would still be there.  It generates electricity only when certain conditions prevail.  It is unpredictable, unreliable, and non-dispatchable.

    I will take cost effective, reliable gas fired electricity generation over the fickle folly of wind any time!

  • Anonymous

    Thank you for the correction.  The web that has been woven by the perpetration of the Industrial Wind Scam on the State of Maine by this family is truly disgusting.  Angus told our legislators that we were the “Saudi Arabia of Wind”.  That is a lie as are all the other reasons he gave us to line his pockets with taxpayer $$$. 

  • Anonymous

    While natural gas is currently fairly low cost in the US, that is about to change. Cheneire Energy has a huge facility in Sabine, Texas that was designed for import of natural gas. Now that large reserves have been found in the US they have applied for a permit to Export natural gas. Japan and Europe are willing to pay a much higher price per unit than the US market.
    Once US originated natural gas has access to the world market, our prices will rise accordingly. Remember these companies have no obligation to sell to the US, they will sell to the highest bidder.
    There is no such thing as “American Energy”, the “I’m an energy voter” commercial that are constantly airing are a bold faced lie. The US public needs too wake up and realize that .

    • Anonymous

       and that’s one advantage of wind power – from land and sea.  We won’t be exporting it overseas.  Other fuels such as oil and gasoline from the US are currently being exported, and yes, LNG is next, making our prices for these commodities subject to the world market.  Wind power won’t have that liability.  Welcome to the global economy.

  • Natural gas isn’t ANY cleaner than oil.  The natural gas companies don’t want  you to know that and that’s why they decided to put the word “natural” to make it sound clean.  Do some research.  I’ve actually read some independent studies that say natural gas is worse for the environment than oil.  What we need to do is develop better storage mechanisms for renewable energies, and slowly make the transition.  An investment in renewable energies will be costly now.. But within ten years it will have payed for itself and we will be on the right track.  After ten years we could all have free electricity.. Natural gas is what is causing all of our sinkholes.  Does no one care about our environment anymore? I agree that wind is a scam and I would not want a wind turbine near my home. We need to find a better way to use wind energy. Hydro, solar, tidal, geothermal, and other renewables are the answer. NOT natural gas

    • Anonymous

      Natural gas has no particulates pollution and far less carbon than coal or oil.

      • Anonymous

        I’m all for natural gas, and we are developing fields in the US. The problem is that the unit price is low in the US (good for consumers, bad for gas companies). Natural gas is going onto the world market because if the companies can make greater profits overseas, then the gas will go overseas. Cheniere Energy has a huge facility in Sabine TX (they don’t mind industry, or windmills in TX) that was built for LNG import. Now that new fields have been developed in the US Cheniere has applied for a permit to EXPORT LNG. These companies have no loyalty to the US, they will sell the gas to the highest bidder, period. What you are seeing is a temporary low in natural gas prices, once our gas hit’s the world market a correction will be made to bring our unit price “in line” with the world demand. (Remember Japan shut down all it’s nuke plants, and India has a huge appetite for LNG).
        There is no such thing as US ENERGY, the quicker everyone realizes that the quicker we can find a solution.

  • Natural gas is not clean energy. It is cleaner than coal. Renewable energy is clean.

    The cost of natural gas will rise quickly once the infrastructure to deliver it is in place. The cost will also rise when fracturing is regulated. The cost of the damage to the environment also needs to be factored into the true cost of natural gas.     

    Electricity produced from renewable sources , wind and solar, is clean and inexpensive. We are in  transition moving from dirty polluting fuels to clean sustainable energy. The fossil fuel industry is trying to slow the movement to clean energy by mounting a propaganda campaign to discredit the competition.

    Today  a home owner can gain energy independence. If you have a home that is open to the south call a solar electric company and ask for a site survey and a quote for a PV system. Call a heating contractor and ask for information regarding air source heat pumps. Ask the heating contractor about air to water heat pumps for domestic hot water.

    If you do this you will find that solar and new 21st century heating technology is far less expensive than continuing to rely on fosill fuels.

    • Anonymous

      Wind inexpensive? Are you nuts?

  • Anonymous

    patom1:  Open your eyes and take a ride along the roads they have blasted out of the clear cut mountaintops where these wind machines stand. Rollins Mountain, Bull Hill, Spruce Mtn, Stetson Mtn, Saddleback, Black Mtn, Kibby Mtn, Mars Hill are just a short list of the destruction that has been done.  Brad Blake has some fantastic pictures of the process where they have put these monstrosities.   http://www.windtaskforce.org   Get off your couch and take a ride.  But then again, maybe you can’t be objective.  Maybe you are involved in the Wind Scam.

  • Anonymous

    “I’d put my money on the sun and solar energy.  What a source of power!  I hope we don’t have to wait to run out of coal and oil before we tackle that.”  -Thomas Edison 1931

  • Anonymous

    The possibility of a chance explosion at a natural gas facility palls in comparison to the alterations created by the construction of wind power turbines.   While turbines do not generally explode they can set sparks which will cause a forest fire when they fail. (not if they fail).  I am neither a proponent nor an opponent of wind power but it seems humorous that for years, those who claimed that wind energy was the savior of the planet, cry foul when it is proposed for an area close to them.  The same goes for LNG facilities which would provide jobs and resource availability for working Maine families.  The NIMBYs have their little corner of what they consider the ideal, they just do not want anyone else to have the same opportunity.

    • The Scots are planing an off shore wind farm that will provide electricity to 40% of homes in Scotland. Compared to the threat posed by climate change the negatives associated with wind seem like a good deal.  

      • Anonymous

        wind produces 16% of what the actually numbers are.. You already know wind is trash yet you look  to benifit yourself. 

        • How is this a benefit to me other than the common good done by switching to clean renewable sources of energy?

  • Anonymous

    Gas, not wind.

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