October 20, 2017
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Comments for: Bank to auction off Live Lobster properties

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  • County Escapee

    This summer’s prices may have put them out of business anyway. 
    Reminds me of seeing a midwest farmer watch all his equipment being auctioned off by the bank. All the work put in and all the workers jobs… Gone!
    I guess all the infrastructure and education, et al. “built” by the government didn’t work this time. Some may take credit when it works, but no one will take credit when it fails.

    • Anonymous

      If the Prospect Harbor facility had stayed open, summer prices might have been different. If LiveLobster had stayed open, when the Canadian processors would not take shedders from Maine this summer, LiveLobster could have processed 1 million pounds. It was no longer in business. Should this result be credited solely to the company or to the adversaries who worked to put the company out of business?

      • County Escapee

        Not knowing the lobster business or even what a shedder is (I’ve asked before with no response so I’ll assume it’s a soft shell), then the place wasn’t run right; it was a perfect storm of events that brought it down; they should have had the name Solyndra so the entity that ‘built that’ would’ve helped them. Result ? lost jobs….

  • Anonymous

    Obviously Bush’s fault……….

    • Anonymous

      Actually, we can thank John E Baldacci for helping a dem. insider.

    • Thanks for the chuckle this afternoon….

  • Anonymous

    There’s a shock….NOT

  • Downeasta

    Its all about location.  Gouldsboro is not the location.  Belfast would have been an excellent location if the building had not been destroyed.

    I wish the best of luck to the young fellow on MDI that is working at starting a similar facility.  At the least he seems better set up for knowledge and research for what is needed.

    • Anonymous

      They were processing lobster not eating them! Your comment makes no sense. Fact is Bussone is a crook!

      • Anonymous

        Actually he isn’t. He is an honorable man. Many people did not want him to succeed because he had a business model which would have shifted power in ways that made people uncomfortable. He was disrupting what one local leader called “the human ecology.” Of course the problem with that ecology is that it creates a lobster industry where most of the profits do not stay in Maine.

      • Downeasta

        I made no remark about consumption.  Your not interpreting what I posted.

         The comment I made was that the location for the industry would have had higher overhead (cost) than if he had chosen one further south nearer a better transportation hub. 

        The Stinson plant is quite removed from highways.  Thus if a competing operation was opened say in Belfast, their cost of transportation would be much lower.

        To make a business like that viable. Using their plan that they used in Mass. They need to be near a airport and major highways. The Stinson plant has none of those. It was destined to fail.

        • Anonymous

          I was responding to “alt20.” I agree that a better infrastructure in downeast Maine is key in the long term for any value-added business in Hancock and Washington Counties. I think the advantage the Prospect Harbor provided was an excellent facility and a superb and dedicated workforce.  Also economic development for downeast Maine. A worthy if risky goal. During the time LiveLobster operated in Gouldsboro, it added well over $1 million to the local economy.

          In the end it cost LiveLobster almost everything. They invested every cent they had in trying to make the venture work. Perhaps the risk was too high? Perhaps some of us in Maine made the risk higher than it needed to be?

  • Anonymous

    They need to just knock that weird, big guy down and forget about the whole thing.
    And just get some free Obama money instead of trying to put a business there.Duh.

  • Anonymous

    This whole story, from the beginning, has just been more evidence that factory jobs are gone in Maine.  Those folks who still work in the few that exist (paper mills) would be wise to start planning an exit strategy.   With some training, anybody can pick lobster meat or run a paper machine. And in developing countries, they can do it for a whole lot less. That’s not going to change.

    • Anonymous

      Atlantic Canada where they process so much of the Maine lobster harvest is not a developing country.

  • Anonymous

    It might be useful to ask: what was LiveLobster trying to achieve and why did it fail? All the innuendos aside, all the repetitions in this story of previous stories involves remarkably superficial reporting. Who had an interest in LiveLobster failing and how did they contribute to the result?

  • A little due diligence on the part of Maine State Officials would have immediately discovered that Lobster Web had no corporate capacity at all because of the Browne lawsuit and all the heartache , dashed hopes and actual losses Maine fisherman have suffered could have been spared.  This was on Baldacci’s watch, by the way, and was widely touted as  a save ( via new product) for Maine’s last cannery and its jobs.

    Here is a good history on how lal this started from Working Waterfront http://www.workingwaterfront.com/articles/Industry-insider-to-purchase-Prospect-Harbor-plant/13994/

    Sure we need lobster processing in Maine, right in Maine communities but it would have taken no time at all to find out Bussone did not have the corporate capability to do what Lilenthal was selling the Governor . All the document son the lawsuit were publicly available at the time all this was getting started and the implications were very very clear.

    State policy on jobs and economic development should look first to Mainers and Maine communities when loans and grants are available to build added value by Mainers from within Maine communities.

    Lindsay Newland Bowker
    Stonington, Maine

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