December 14, 2017
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Comments for: Pen Bay Medical Center working to cut down high readmission rates after Medicare penalty

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  • Anonymous

    If Medicare actually provided comprehensive medical care for people, or if we had universal healthcare, then readmissions would drop dramatically.  This is just another GOP strategy for appearing to reduce spending while passing the cost along to everyone.  The people against Universal healthcare just don’t get it.  One way or anther we do all pay for healthcare. It would be much more efficient, and thus cost much less, to just implement non-profit Universal healthcare. It would be much better for the patients too.

    • Anonymous

      So true

  • Anonymous

    This is what happens when the government is involved in healthcare.  If the hospital kept a patient in until they were well enough to be discharged they would be penalized.  Instead, they discharge when the feds say they have to and……surprise, surprise……they end up readmitted.  There is NO way the hospital can win.  And, no way the patient can win.

    • Anonymous

      The push to discharge patients early came years ago from insurance companies, not the government. The motivation was the old bottom line ie: profits.

      • Anonymous

        Insurance companies are a legalized  Mafia.   Just wait till Obama Care begins, everyone will finally see the truth.  It will not be nice.

        • Anonymous

           It’s already begun and most people love it.What needs to happen is ins.cos.need to be shut down but the crooked R’s won’t like that.

          • Anonymous

            You need to add crooked D’s to your list.  Get real.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks to the reporter for illustrating what a small financial penalty is involved.  Doing so gives more of a clue that attention must be given to the need for the provision of quality care, not just “any” care, whether in hospital, or at related practitioner offices.  “Anycare for all,” is not what is needed.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe if patients weren’t kicked out of the door before they’re healed, they wouldn’t need to go back to the hospital. The excuse is that patients are at a high risk of contracting a hospital based infection if they aren’t tossed out early. But I’ll wager most of the re-admissions have infections and pain control issues.

  • Anonymous

    Glad I don’t have to get my family taken care of there…….wow.

  • Anonymous

    Holding providers and insurers  responsible is just one part of the ACA.  It is only the beginning of better health more affordably for all the citizens of our country.

  • Anonymous

    Just another way to cause delays in healthcare & to penalize hospitals & doctors.  This gawdawful administration will not be happy until we are standing in lines waiting for care.

    • Anonymous

      Seems the hospitals disagree with you as they are trying to fix the problem

    • Anonymous

       The usual lies from your side.

  • Anonymous

    Just one more example of good from the Affordable Care Act

  • Anonymous

    wondering if all the prescription drug seekers are skewing this at all.

  • fangbin818

    tinyurl.com/cyk9xz2

  • Anonymous

    Would the insurance companies have any thing to do with it  ?

  • Having just been horrified by my dad’s readmissions back into Portsmouth Hospital, New Hampshire, I would like to add my humble 2 cents worth, and it has nothing to do with politics, although that does figure into it.  The lack of professionalism, cleanliness and simple attention to patients is truly appalling. Medical care has taken a huge step backwards with sanitation. Everyone and anyone can come in, passing along germs. Nurses wear jeans on dress down day?? You got to kidding me? No! What ever happened to having a protected and sanitary environment? And we wonder why people like my dad, now 85 with cancer, has had both merca and Cdif????? Clara Barton would be shocked. Patients are left to wallow in their vomit, and other messes, for hours at a time, and this is suppose to be in a hospital? Sterility and methods to combat this made huge strides in medical care, and in the last 20 yrs has been blown out the window with this very casual atmosphere in hospitals now. No wonder why my dad lasted 2 days in rehab? He had merca, and it was not cleared up. He can hardly address the cancer for all the hospital born infections. And let’s not talk about Medicare and how the govt is dictating his care now. I can’t even get into that nightmare!!!

  • Anonymous

    We will eventually get universal health care, but, oh, how the GOP is going to dislike giving up on the US going to a new WAR every couple of years.

  • Anonymous

    Obama care has increase the cost of care for everyone.

  • sassyfrazz

    If Medicare paid the actual cost of care instead of what it deems should be the cost of care, hospitals probably wouldn’t be booting patients out too soon to keep from going under.

  • Anonymous

    This is just great- penalizing the hospitals for a problem that Medicare caused in the first place.  It all started with the initiation of so-called DRG’s (Diagnostic Related Groups) in the 80’s.  Under that system, which was the precursor to today’s reimbursement model, Medicare looked at the national average  length of stay for any particular diagnosis to determine how much the hospital would be reimbursed.  For example, if somebody had a heart attack the feds would look at how many days the average recovery would take and that was the number of days’ hospitalization Medicare would reimburse, say 5 days.  If the hospital could discharge the patient after only 3 days, it made money because it was getting paid for 5.  Conversely, if the patient was kept 10 days, the hospital lost money.    That was all well and good if the population you were dealing with was young and healthy.  Maine, like the nation, has an aging population with much more complex health needs.  Additionally, this is a very rural state with a larger than average population of uninsured residents, who also tend to be in a lower socioeconomic class than the rest of the country.  Hence, Maine hospitals already operate at a disadvantage.  I believe this is only going to get worse under Obamacare because medical decisions are going to be made by bureaucrats, not physicians.  Medicare is going broke and, love her or hate her, Sarah Palin was right in her assessment that “yay vs. nay” treatment decisions will fall to bureaucratic “death panels”.  Harshly put, perhaps, but true nonetheless.   

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