December 17, 2017
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Comments for: Lincoln officials decide not to cite man for illegal burial

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  • Anonymous

    We ought to be watching our borders like our graveyards. 

  • m

  • Lionel Marquis

    Nice to see that common sense prevailed.

  • Anonymous

    When they dug it up?? I think these guys broke the law, I did not know they could take it upon themselves to exhume a grave without proper authority?? Okay now we got the lord all mighty proper town worker in the graveyard, now did they have the proper legal right and law there to exhume a grave?? Might have been tampering with evidence, or something. I understand they wanted proper list, but is anoymous okay? This is mostly busy body stuff, it should have not been in print here.

    • Anonymous

       “This is mostly busy body stuff…” says pattenpond.  Sounds like this body wasn’t busy at all.

    • Anonymous

      If you re-read the story they didn’t know what was buried.  Once they realized it was cremains they reburied him until they could sort out the issue.  It seems they did just that and he will be placed in the right plot now.

      • Anonymous

        They had no business disturbing a grave in a graveyard without legal rep.They needed to report this to authorities, they are not the authorities. They could be sued themselves for self admiting disturbing a grave without proper legal right.

        • Anonymous

           So if it had been a dog that they wanted to bury with a family member they need to involve law enforcement?  I think a little common sense is needed.  And these two people had no one else with them like you would at a funeral and didn’t bother to ask the funeral director if they could just go dig a hole in the cemetery.  Think about it nothing that happened in this situation was perfect but all ended well.

          • Anonymous

            No runner, Iwas not talking about the people doing the burying, they were fine, it was the town authorities digging this up with no authority to do so.

        • Anonymous

          The cemetery is owned by the city, so i guess they are the authotities.

          • Anonymous

            The city may own it, but they cannot go digging up graves without a order to exhume.

  • Anonymous

    This article is exactly why I am all in favor of families taking care of deceased relatives.  I would rather go back to the old traditions where family washed the body, sat by the deceased, built the coffin, and placed their bodies in the grave. It is a part of the healing process yet we have taken it all away.  Funeral Homes make tons of money, the town wants their share, and I could go on.  It is time to change things for those of us who want to keep our family close to us, even in death.

    • Anonymous

      Who removes the body’s organs, Uncle Fester?

      • Anonymous

        hugh? they don’t do that now. Why would someone have to do that in the first place?

        • Anonymous

          To return them to the Wurlitzer Company?

    • Anonymous

      Within the last 10 years or so a friend did much as you describe when his father passed. Including building the coffin and digging the grave. A cemetary rep was there to make sure they dug in the right place and it helped that he had a backhoe. Unless laws have changed it is perfectly legal. No embalming required, no funeral home involvement etc.

    • What if you do not have family?

    • Anonymous

      Great point.  Simple is best.  I’ve told my husband for decades, when I pass just throw my body on the fire pit and make some smores w/family and friends (w/Clapton or Robert Plant in the backgroud).  Cremation is the way to go.  Funerals, wakes and burials are just way too morbid     

      • Anonymous

        I have told my wife to drag me out in the back woods and prop me up against a tree.  Recycling in it’s purest form

      • Anonymous

        I would go for a funeral pyre as well – i’m sure my husband would honor my wishes – but the state would probably prevent and or charge him with unlawful disposal of remains.  Wonder how I would find out if I can be burned to a crisp on my own property after I die?

    • Anonymous

      There are religions in this country that still do that.  Most people I know can no longer afford to bury their dead.  I don’t know if it is possible, but it would be nice to bury family on their land too.

      • Anonymous

         Private cemeteries on private land are legal in Maine. Green burial is also legal. I think Maine must be one of the most sensible states in the country on this topic.

    • Old Bear

      Perfected way of saying it. The funeral homes are making 100’s of thousands of dollars a year. When my father died 19 yrs ago. The funeral bill was $75oo and how the same funeral I bet would 14 to 15 thousand dollars for the 3 day’s. Pretty sad its came to this kind of a profit margin. I would think they are making 65% to 70% profit.   

  • Conley Raye

    The poster is right. Everyone wants to fleece the family of the departed. If you think about it, a cemetery is sort of gross as is, the wake and burial. Plus all the decay, etc. I, now feel that cremation is the proper way. No land, can elect a celebration of life at a relatives home or not, no elaborate fees taken from the grieved, ones. It makes the most sense, these days. Our new era of kids do not visit or maintain graves any longer and that is the times, so why bother and leave your container to the bugs, etc. The end is the end and if my belief is right that sperm creates everything but the mind then the mind will depart at death and move on, regardless.

    • Anonymous

      Everyone wants to fleece the family of the departed.Yeah,especially other family members who did nothing to aid the person in their last days.Especially certain churches,er,cults..

  • Anonymous

    What next?  In Waterville, the cost to dig a hole for cremains is $200.  I think I’ve found a way around that, though.  Mine will be scattered on top of the grass.  Now watch the DEP come along and fine my family for air pollution.

    • ChuckGG

      I’d look into that a bit more.  I had the opportunity to spread a friend’s ashes as per his request, and I was honored to do so.  But, I discovered the ashes are anything but “ash.”  There was no “blowing away in the wind.”  You see that in the movies but what I had would not have blown away in a hurricane.  The cremains were more like medium gravel sized chopped up bones and bone/white color.  A good rain would not have washed these into the soil.  So, spreading them on the grass?  Maybe not.

      • Anonymous

        I knew a man whose job it was to cremate the dead.  He said there couldn’t be ashes left because at the high heat they used, all ashes burned up. What’s left, he said, was crushed bone. It sounds better to refer to a person’s ashes rather than Grandpa’s crushed bones, however. 

        • ChuckGG

          Agreed.  I looked up the process and it says just that – the skeletal form remains.  This is put through a device to break the bones into smaller pieces.

          The movies still portray “ashes” as something akin to what you get when you clean out the fireplace, which of course are very light and any wind would blow them everywhere.

        • Anonymous

          True.I looked thru my dads ashes,and there were some fairly large fragments.Very interesting.We are all but a whisper here.So fragile and temporary..

      • Anonymous

        Thank you, CG. You may have inadvertently hit upon something positive about having advanced osteoporosis-haha.

      • Anonymous

        Just got some more info:http://mainedeathcare.com/alternatives.htm#promession
        Apparently, there are a few methods that will result in ash. One is called “promession” and involves acid and vibration. That almost begs me to include the Beach Boys’ “Good Vibrations” song. What a way to go!

        • Anonymous

           Ask Kieth Richards. 

    • Anonymous

      My dad is in a glass container right here in my room with me.And he will be until I am compelled to do otherwise.

  • Anonymous

    My family has 11 plots in one area, cremation allows us to bury more ashes then bodies in there,  and we are among other Catholics… (-;

    • Anonymous

      The Catholic Church requires that “ashes” not be left unburied for long.   I don’t know the time limit though.  

      • Jst4Today

        I didn’t know that.  For so long the Church didn’t even allow cremation.  Why do they have a time limit do you suppose?

        • Anonymous

          I have no idea,  but it was information printed in the Harvest magazine or whatever it’s called, that comes in the mail from the church.  

  • Am I the only one learning a lot from this article and comments. I did not know about the body not being ashes and being bone parts.

    It appears a person needs to have the documents in place for what to do if you get sick, a will, and I would say a document of some sort stating “this is what I want done with my remains.” I had planned on and need to redo my documents and this articles and the postings have been a big help what I need to say and state.

  • Anonymous

    How did the mayor know that this man was a “gentleman.”  Gentleman and lady are both political terms…Say man…Say woman…As Mother Jones used to say “God made women and the Rockerfellers made the ladies..”
     I love in court when the attorney asks, “Is the gentleman that killed the ten members of you family in the court today?”
     And the witness answers, “That gentleman over there..”
      Do gentlemen kill people?

  • Anonymous

    My now 89 year old mother has buried at least 3 relatives cremains in family plots.  One great aunt was enraged and reburied my great uncle somewhere else.  My favorite one was my uncle who was buried under the flower pot.  Everyone thought my sister and I were sobbing at the graveside service, but we were trying to hold back our laughter as we knew Uncle Eddie was under the flower pot.  I suspect these burials happens more often than people realize.

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