Comments for: Sanford nursing home finds maggots on resident

Posted Aug. 09, 2012, at 8:43 a.m.

SANFORD | Maine Department of Health and Human Services officials plan to visit a Sanford nursing home after maggots were found on a resident. A spokesman for the agency says the Newton Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing informed the department about the incident and the steps being taken to …

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  • Anonymous

    Wow.

  • Anonymous

    Gross and unacceptable.

  • Anonymous

    Did they lay off all housekeeping!? Gosh, the place sounds filthy if there were maggots found on the patient!! I’ll make sure not to put any of my loved ones in that place.  EWWW W WW!!

    • House keepers examine patients now?  

      • Anonymous

        no but they clean the bedrooms and the such

        • Anonymous

          Pass the buck to the least able to defend themselves. Or as is quite common, ‘Crap flows downhill’.

  • Anonymous

    They left a bed ridden patient alone for almost 12 HOURS??? 

    • Anonymous

      No, they didn’t leave the patient alone for 12 hours.  The wound check is done every 12 hours

      • Anonymous

        Or so they said.

      • Anonymous

        Logical if working 12 hour shifts.

  • Anonymous

    It doesn’t make sense that the resident hadn’t been checked in 12 hours,indeed if this was a boarding home I would understand. But the real problem is that flies lay eggs in decaying flesh,it takes a day for the eggs to hatch into maggots. So that’s 24 hours but how long was the wound with the decaying flesh unnoticed? Granted if the maggots were allowed to stay the wound would have been cleaned by the maggots. Although  maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is a natural treatment I think neglect was present in this case.

  • Anonymous

     Hundreds of dollars a day……and you get maggots. Bet the food is great too.

  • There are a couple of different issues here.

    It only takes one fly to leave eggs to hatch on a wound. So housekeeping might not be an issue. The more disturbing thing is that flies generally lay their eggs on “rotting”/necrotizing flesh. (at least the kind of flies found in NE.) That a resident had a rotting wound that was open and not checked on for over 12 hours is more than disturbing.

    BTW, we should remember that Christopher Reeves died from complications from a pressure wound. It doesn’t take long for systemic infection to set in and kill. In the case of this person at this nursing home, however gross we may see the situation, it could be that the maggots actually provided some medical benefit by eating the diseased tissue. Thereby preventing further infection. I don’t think that will help the home out in court though.

    Ok, you can go back to your breakfast now.

    • Anonymous

      They actually clean wounds quite well and in some cultures it is common to use them.

  • Anonymous

    Shut them down!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Anonymous

    Same thing happened in Portland last year, so you can see this kind of care can be seen even in the “best” of  facilities. LOL

  • Anonymous

    The wound and probably the maggots were most likely there before the patient arrived. The fact that this went unnoticed for over 12 hours is alarming to say the least.

  • Pamela 058

    Not good at all..same thing happened in Portland a few years back at one of the nursing homes..this is not the first time this has happened in nursing homes.

  • anonme 527

    …and the LePage administration wants to cut Medicaid…

  • Anonymous

    “the resident was checked less than 12 HOURS before?”   Any nursing home I worked in the patients were checked at least six times in an eight hour shift, probably more like eight times in a shift…..12 hours is a long time for any patient to go without personal care especially if they are incontinent and/or bedridden…..I am betting this was found in a bedsore which is dead tissue caused by prolonged pressure on an area of skin, ie: hip, coccyx, buttock, shoulder…..bedsores are usually the result of lack of care…..not turning a bedridden patient every two hours or leaving them sitting too long in a geri-chair  causing  the circulation to be impinged by pressure and the flesh dies….twelve hours is a long time to wait for care….sitting in their own body fluids to boot I bet…..this place sounds like a hellhole….time to shut the doors……

  • Guest

    —–

  • Anonymous

    “…found on the resident during a regular check.” Really? Regular? I don’t think so…

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