More NH mosquitoes found to carry West Nile

This undated photo provided by the Northwest Mosquito Abatement District  shows a Culex pipiens, left, the primary mosquito that can transmit West Nile virus to humans, birds and other animals. It is produced from stagnant water. The bite of this mosquito is very gentle and usually unnoticed by people. At right is an Aedes vexans, primarily a nuisance mosquito produced from freshwater. It is a very aggressive biting mosquito but not an important transmitter of disease.
Northwestern Mosquito Abatement District | AP
This undated photo provided by the Northwest Mosquito Abatement District shows a Culex pipiens, left, the primary mosquito that can transmit West Nile virus to humans, birds and other animals. It is produced from stagnant water. The bite of this mosquito is very gentle and usually unnoticed by people. At right is an Aedes vexans, primarily a nuisance mosquito produced from freshwater. It is a very aggressive biting mosquito but not an important transmitter of disease.
Posted Aug. 08, 2012, at 5:53 p.m.

CONCORD, N.H. — New Hampshire health officials say 18 batches of mosquitoes taken from Manchester, Nashua and Salem have tested positive for the West Nile virus.

This is in addition to the eight batches that the city of Manchester already announced this season. The findings have caused the Department of Health and Human Services to raise the risk level for the virus and ones related to it in these cities.

“While this is our first announcement of West Nile virus in New Hampshire this season, we have been hearing of positive test results from some of our neighboring states already,” said Dr. Sharon Alroy-Preis, state epidemiologist.

The virus is transmitted from the bite of an infected mosquito. It was first identified in New Hampshire in August 2000. Last year, nine mosquito batches tested positive for the virus in the state.

Health officials remind people to use mosquito repellant, wear long sleeves and pants at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active, and remove standing water from around the house so mosquitoes do not have a place to breed.

The public health lab has tested 1,621 mosquito batches, two animals and 10 people so far this season.

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