September 26, 2017
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Comments for: Aroostook livestock growers express need for USDA facility in The County

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  • Anonymous

    Bottom line, not enough business to support a slaughter house. Been many small ones around, chances are if they could grow bigger, they would have. 

    • Anonymous

      Bottom line is – USDA is screwing around with our food supply. 

    • Anonymous

      His 11-year-old business has increased by continuously providing fair prices and services such as free delivery, adding that his custom cutting shop currently processes about 55 animals a week. Mr. Haines has had a thriving business, its the Maynard’s that have a problem with traveling animals for inspection. Potato farmers do not have to travel produce to have it inspected why would beef farmers have to. No reason not to have an inspection station in Aroostook county for the small animal farmer. Would save money for all in the long run. I wouldn’t mind paying less for organic meat. And it definitely taste better.

      • Anonymous

         The tastes better is in you’re head. But seriously…..hire a USDA inspector to visit local slaughter houses.  Mr Haines needs  this. Vs a 1.2 million dollar plant that will eventually loose money, but not before it ruins the local slaughter houses and run them out of business. Mr. Haines is successful, support it with a 50/60,000 dollar a yr employee, vs a 1.2 million dollar plant.

  • so why not put them on a train?

  • Anonymous

    All the USDA would do is provide an inspector, at no cost to the facility, to observe the slaughter and cutting process, as long as the standards were met the facility could operate as is saw fit, even using organic processes.  I am not standing up for the agency by any means, but their involvement in a facility such as this is minimal.  

  • Anonymous

    Sounds like a good idea, and Haines and the Maynards seem to have done their homework. You can make money as a smaller farmer or processor and benefit the County by thinking outside the box a little. One small change such as being able to get the USDA stamp locally can have a huge multiplier effect on a local or regional economy.

  • Anonymous

    Just another in the long line of regulations that make it difficult to prosper in rural Maine.

    Rural cleansing continues……….

    • Anonymous

      You suppose we get rid of regulation’s?  Yeah that has gone great in our past. I would love to eat contaminated meat with god know’s what in it.

      • Anonymous

         I’ve been on organic farms. Beef and milks cows. On avg some of the more dirty places as farms go. No joke.

  • Anonymous

    Aroostook  County needs diversification like this for using abandoned farmland. Driving through Woodland you see these beautiful Scottish Highlands and a horse farm and other examples of farm diversification. Stan and Gail Maynard are smart hardworking people. They treat their cattle humanely giving them tons of room to graze naturally and healthfully – not on feedlots.  “sounds like a plan!” Good luck to these folks.Hope  the USDA and whatever resources are out there get behind this.

  • Anonymous

    grass feed beef…. hmmmm sounds yummy, but the general consumer will complain becuase it will be to tough to eat

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