Comments for: Govs’ health care questions crucial to moving on Obamacare

Posted July 18, 2012, at 4:32 p.m.

Overhauling the United States health care system will be complicated and take time. It will rightfully involve feedback and questions from the states and assistance and flexibility from the federal government. But having questions about the law should not deter states from cooperating with the implementation of the Affordable Care …

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  • beangood

    When the federal government opens the floodgates for healthcare dollars there is no possible or other way to afford a 100% roll out. 

    We’ve seen this already with the federal stimulus funds. When fast track programs granted hundreds of millions of dollars for private investment, through public partnership funds and now, the results are all mediocre at best. To the absurd point of the fiscal-cliff, where taxes are raised just as government services are cut.

    To suggest that every state should now expand the medicare program at the loss of other essential government services, is a challenge that needs a solution more than a recommendation.

    • Anonymous

       Um, there is no expansion of Medicare planned. Did you mean Medicaid? Mediocre results are whose fault? It is not the federal funds but the recipients that will determine results. At least that is how it appears to me.

  • Anonymous

    Better to let the federal government set up the program and have them pay the entire cost rather than have the states set it up never knowing when the Federal Government will dump the entire cost on the state.  They say they will after three years pass 10% onto the state if the state sets it up…. how much in following years?

    • Anonymous

      The time will come when it will get dumped on the states…unless there is a national health care system.

      Like I said with HillaryCare: demonstrate it works in DC.  Eventho the cards are stacked in the government’s favor in a federal district, show it works and the rest of the states will line up.

    • Anonymous

       Good question for which there is no answer. Can be no answer. Will be up to Congress. You know. Our elected representatives.

      •  another liberal heard from.

        • Anonymous

          Hear, hear!  Glad to hear it.

        • Anonymous

          So….. who is it up to in your world? And, who has the crystal ball to see into the future?

      • Anonymous

        The states are ill-able to handle the additional burden.  If they want it let the feds pay for it. The moment the states accept responsibility. Your taxes will go up.

        • Anonymous

           The feds (you and I) are paying for it for the first how many years and 90% after that. States will have no such burden unless someone pulls the plug as you suggested in an earlier post to which I replied no way to know. But we cannot be help hostage to those kinds of predictions. Our taxes have to go up at some point. There is no other way out of this mess created by spiraling health care costs that added to the deficit and two costly ‘wars’ and risky Wall Street behavior. Those that say no to tax increases are just digging the hole deeper. Locally my taxes went up in part to pay for increases in materials for local road repairs. I think spending tax money on infrastructure and health care is a good investment. About time.

          • Anonymous

             The history of social programs particularly medicaid is of feds sitting up states to take the fall.  Its easily predictable.   If the Feds set it up they maintain responsibility. If Maine sets it up we are in a “you built it, you own it” situation.

    • Anonymous

       Shortly after AHC is in full swing we will all come to our senses and realise how wrong the congress was not to commit to single payer health plan.  That is the only way to control the increasing cost of health care. The free market system is flawed when Doctors, Hospitals,Drug companies and any one involved can make huge profits and deliver some of the worst results for the cost we have to bear.

    • Anonymous

      You are confusing the state’s option of participating in Medicaid expansion (MaineCare here) with the state’s option of opening up subsidized health insurance exchanges.  If a  state turns down the former, no Medicaid expansion will occur in that state; if the state turns down the latter, the federal government will step in.
        As the federal tax rates are at a lower level than at any time since WW II, you are clearly worried too much about increases in taxes.  We had a far more prosperous economy under the higher rates Clinton enacted in 1993.   

  • Anonymous

    Funding for the Medicaid portion of the ACA should be more reliable as those states who refuse to take part will lose funding for it then creates more funding for those states who opt into the program.  The last time I checked the State of Maine gets something like $1.47 returned from the federal government for every $1.00 it sends to them.  If you start cutting federal money to the states you are cutting jobs.  If you start cutting jobs the local tax returns will decline.  This would lead to an increase in local fees and taxes including property taxes.  It is dumb to refuse an increase in federal money.  

    • Anonymous

      The problem is what happens when the feds no longer send the increased amount of money? Then states are responsible for a huge sum of money at a time when very few states are operating in the black ink.

      • Anonymous

         The first three years are covered 100% . The next years 90%.  Who knows what the economic situation will be in five years from now?  Who knows how much change in the health care situation will be five years from now? Sunshine is a rather optimistic name for a pessimist. 

  • Anonymous

    My sentiments exactly.

  • Anonymous

    Gov. LePage is exactly correct in his approach. We must resist implementation of this behemoth boondoggle in every possible way, and pray that Obama is shown the curb in November so we can get to work to Repeal and Replace with sensible affordable effective reforms. Keep up the good work, Governor.

    http://www.mittromney.com/news/press/2012/06/we-must-repeal-and-replace-obamacare-0

    As for you, BDN: Is there a radical leftist cause you don’t support? Man, do I ever miss my once moderate hometown newspaper.

    • Anonymous

      Better keep praying.  Just remember  prayers are not always answered, at least not in the way that you want.

      It would be far better to do something constructive with Medicade than foot drag and depend on blind hope that you’ll get off the hook.

    • Anonymous

      I think the radical here is you :S

  • Anonymous

    Remember – politics before people.

  • Anonymous

    I find it odd that most other first world countries (and many countries who are not first world countries) apparently can figure out how and manage to provide their citizens with health care…but in this country health care is like string theory…..and no Governor LePage I’m not talking about floss.   

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