Comments for: Panel: Screen troops for PTSD annually

Posted July 13, 2012, at 4:06 p.m.

WASHINGTON — The Institute of Medicine recommended Friday that soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan undergo annual screening for post-traumatic stress disorder and that federal agencies conduct more research to determine how well the various treatments for PTSD are working. Of the 2.6 million service members deployed to Iraq and …

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  • Jim LaPierre

    Future research will show that the figures above are grossly under reported. DOD has the responsibility to care for active duty. Stateside the VA is failing and will continue to fail. Government made problems do not get solved by government.  The problems will get worse – history tells us that very clearly. Kudos and well wishes to the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

  • Jason Hansman is both far more accurate, but also dangerously naieve, in his statement’s and the basis for them. While he is correct in his statement’s that a Service Member’s career is over (for all practical purpose’s) if they go seek help, he is also either ignoring, or deliberately refusing to, acknowlege the use of the PTSD label by a Service Member’s Unit Commmander as a weapon in instilling a perverse type of Unit disciplne or cohesion thru the threatening a Service Member’s career with a PTSD tag in their Personnel Jacket. In short, perverse discipline thru Command coercion and Unit blackmail. This type of perversion has already been seen in the Abu Graib investigation and aftermath and was documented by the Army’s Inspector General. We all saw where that went, didn’t we ?

    What’s needed here is a DOD-wide policy of requiring EVERYONE, combat role or not, to be seen at least twice a year for stress and that evaluation be based on a definitive diagnosis, not taking the Unit Commander’s ‘word’ that their unit member is suffering from stress when it’s the Unit Commander who is showing sign’s of failing leadership or Command. It also requires that these so-called Evaluator’s have some actual exposure to the stress’s that their patient’s go thru in order to have a objective basis for their evaluation’s. How many people have been labeled with PTSD when in fact the label was used as an excuse to ‘justify’ ‘blacklisting’ someone simply because the ‘power’s that be’ refused to actually work at, and listen to, the Service Member ? Refusing to listen to and work with the Command’s personnel, especially in a combat unit or combat area, is nothing less than outright arrogance and shows a ‘My way or the highway’ command thinking. That is, frankly, ‘bullscat’ and anyone that has served any time in the Service knows that 1st hand.  Folk’s this is one big, hairy, ticking time bomb and the result’s are not gonna be pretty. And when, and it’s just a matter of time, this PTSD issue shows up in a employment discrimination or wrongful termination suit the entire Country, and other’s like the Brit’s and the Canadian’s, this whole issue of PTSD is going to get a whole new look-see.  Isin’t it the smarter thing to do now to get ahead of ths before it comes back to haunt us ?

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