November 18, 2017
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Comments for: Pet vaccines as important as those for humans, vets say; compliance rates in Maine dangerously low

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  • Guest

    How many people get their dogs vaccinated but don’t register them, thereby skewing the data they extrapolated?  Count me as one of those.

  • Guest

    ….

    • Guest

      I would agree that it is a smart and responsible thing to do to get pets vaccinated, but registration is a joke.  My dogs don’t run loose, and if one of them got loose, they can be easily identified.

      • Guest

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  • Anonymous

    New headline from the not too far distant future:

    Pet micro-chipping as important as those for humans, vets say; compliance rates in Maine dangerously low

    Have you had your implantable micro-chip?

    Will my implantable micro-chip have my inoculation records on it too so I’ll know which vaccines I still need boosters for?

  • Anonymous

    the vets have priced their services out of the market.. simple enough

  • Anonymous

     After the final puppy DHPPC vaccination, I only keep my dogs current on Rabies.  Over vaccinating does not boost immunity but it can have detrimental effect on dogs a risk I’m not willing to take.  In the very near future, Rabies will probably be an every 5 or 7 year vaccine.

  • Anonymous

    The flaw is in the ability to find the pet owners who do not license their animals. If it is required by town law(?), and no one licenses their animals in the first place, how does a town determine that a owner hasn’t licensed their animal in the first place? I have always licensed my dogs, and forgot one year, only to have the officer show up on my doorstep..and so he should have. But if that dog had never been licensed in the first place, he would never know that the fee was due. The licensing serves multiple purposes…to me the most important is an alert to the town when one household has multiple animals, thereby suggesting other purposes behind multiple dog ownership (illegal actions, animal hoarding, wrongful breeding, the need for a kennel license). The license is a very important step in protecting the well being of the animal, as well. They are listed as “existing” and it is a small but needed step to their protection.

    • Guest

      It’s none of the town’s business if I have multiple animals (which I do).  If this “suggests” anything to anybody, that’s their problem.  If I were to register my dogs, it would add nothing to their quality of life.  My wife and I are empty nesters and our world practically revolves around our dogs.  They get walked three times a day, go swimming almost as much, have their own couches (although they are usually found curled up together), and we leave the TV on Animal Planet for them if we have to go off for a few hours.  They are in perfect emotional and physical health.  So, tell me how registering my dogs will improve anything, other than helping to fund our town’s vacant animal control officer position.

      • Guest

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        • Guest

          I love my dogs, and because I do, I have them vaccinated for their sake, for my sake, and for everybody else’s sake that lives in my neighborhood.  It makes sense.  But, I don’t register them.  Tell me how registering MY dogs “ensures” that anybody else will have their pets vaccinated.

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