Lee Academy to partner with Health Access Network to open satellite clinic

Posted July 01, 2012, at 6:56 p.m.
Physicians Assistant Kevin Olsen examines Lynne Stratton of Enfield at the new, $5.4 million Health Access Network office building in Lincoln in July 2009 as her husband, Corey, looks on. Health Access Network will open a satellite medical clinic at Lee Academy by winter to serve students and the surrounding communities, Headmaster Bruce Lindberg said Sunday.
Physicians Assistant Kevin Olsen examines Lynne Stratton of Enfield at the new, $5.4 million Health Access Network office building in Lincoln in July 2009 as her husband, Corey, looks on. Health Access Network will open a satellite medical clinic at Lee Academy by winter to serve students and the surrounding communities, Headmaster Bruce Lindberg said Sunday. Buy Photo
Patients leave the lobby of the new, $5.4 million Health Access Network office building in Lincoln in July 2009. Health Access Network will open a satellite medical clinic at Lee Academy by winter to serve students and the surrounding communities, Headmaster Bruce Lindberg said Sunday.
Patients leave the lobby of the new, $5.4 million Health Access Network office building in Lincoln in July 2009. Health Access Network will open a satellite medical clinic at Lee Academy by winter to serve students and the surrounding communities, Headmaster Bruce Lindberg said Sunday. Buy Photo
Students at Lee Academy walk across campus in September 2009.
Students at Lee Academy walk across campus in September 2009.

LEE, Maine — Health Access Network will open a satellite medical clinic at Lee Academy by winter to serve students and the surrounding communities, Headmaster Bruce Lindberg said Sunday.

Funded with at least a portion of a $787,500 federal Department of Health and Human Services grant, Health Access Network will remodel the Pottle House, a white apartment building centering the campus, Lindberg said.

A physician’s assistant, mental health therapist, hygienist and school receptionist will staff the building, Lindberg said. Residents from Lee, Winn, Springfield — anyone who uses the Health Access offices in Lincoln — can be treated there, Lindberg said.

“They have to be operational in 120 days,” Lindberg said.

“We have used it [Pottle House] for teacher housing and various things over the years,” Lindberg said. “Currently one of our secretaries lives there and the associate headmaster and his wife.”

“Essentially, Health Access is going to replicate that house with modern construction and the building is still ours,” he added.

Health Access and Lee officials have been discussing the clinic idea for about two years, Lindberg said. Officials from Health Access could not be reached for comment Sunday.

The clinic seems like a good deal for residents, Health Access and the community, Lindberg said.

“For Lee Academy, just access is the biggest thing,” Lindberg said, “rather than [having to drive students] to and from Lincoln, which takes an hour, and waiting in a lobby, which takes an hour. That’s taking two, 2 1/2 hours and now they’re walking across the street.”

Residents get the same benefits, Lindberg said.

A federally funded community health center located on West Broadway in Lincoln which, according to the most recent estimates available Sunday, handles 13,000 patients or 50,000 visits annually, Health Access Network has satellite sites in towns around Lincoln, including Enfield.

Lee Academy is a private academy that contracts with the state to provide a high school education for students in and around Lee. This year, it has 270 students, including 115 foreign tuition students, of whom 70 are from the Far East, Lindberg said.

It has been one of Maine’s leaders in the recruitment of students from China and Southeast Asia.

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