December 15, 2017
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Comments for: Passamaquoddy push for restoration of alewife spawning grounds

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  • The tribe is our friend in more ways than one. They are great people and our invironmental partner that has a healthy balance between profit and nature. We should listen and learn.

  • Anonymous

    Here we go again.  If everyone would spend more time trying to find a job instead of who i can sue now, the world would be better off.

  • Anonymous

    Tom, Unless there is a Forest City on both sides of the border isn’t Forest City in Maine?

    • Anonymous

      Forest City is in Maine, just above where I live!!

  • Anonymous

    Forget about the “Great Spirit” and keep the alewife blocked off. They are counter productive to the great bass fishery that Maine guides depend on and also eat the same feed that smelts eat that are good for landlocked salmon, another resource. No alewife!

    • Anonymous

      Alewives are an integral part of marine and freshwater food chains.
      Both adult and juvenile alewives are small and are therefore eaten by
      many other species of native, introduced,
      commercially and recreationally important
      fish. In freshwater, alewives are food for
      large- and smallmouth bass, brown trout
      and other
      salmonids. In
      the estuaries
      and the
      ocean, striped bass, cod and haddock
      feed on alewives, and the recovery of
      these economically valuable fish depends
      in part, on restored populations of
      alewives. In addition, lobstermen depend
      on alewives; they are the traditional
      spring bait for lobsters.

  • Anonymous

    If white man cared for our natural resources as much as the Passamaquoddies
    do, there would be no need for any restoration projects in our State. I write
    as the 1989 Passamaquoddy Fish & Wildlife consultant and in 2000, a
    Legislative advocate and supporter of the St. Croix Waterway Commission for the
    restoration of alewives on the St. Croix River. The alewife run this year is
    the second largest since alewives were permitted to go beyond the dam. Bravo to
    the Passamaquoddies – and I am a white man.

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