December 17, 2017
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Comments for: Great Works dam starts to come down Monday as part of effort to revive the Penobscot

OLD TOWN, Maine — When the demolition of the Great Works dam starts Monday, it will be the first visible step in a 13-year effort to open nearly 1,000 miles of habitat to 11 species of sea-run fish that haven’t had open, easy access to sections of the… Read More
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  • Anonymous


    Before humans began altering the river, between 75,000 and 100,000 Atlantic salmon traveled past Bangor on their annual runs, according to the restoration trust’s deputy director, George Aponte Clarke.”   Love to see the research behind this fiction; since it seems to ignore the returns of salmon to rivers that have dams and fish-ways, i.e. Conn. and those in New Brunswick.

    It also ignores the cyclical variations of alewive runs—–now five ft. deep at the Brunswick viewing window; which are affected not by dams–remember there were big runs up until the 70’s  even though the dams were largely in place by the early 1800’s. 

    No reason whatsoever to take out dams…fishways can accommodate migratory species; unless you like raging rivers washing out everything downstream. the Andro dams not only produce power but throttle down what was once a raging river. 

    The only people who want the dams removed are the 1% who have the time and money to fish and want a trophy to show for it. Screw them.  If we can’t fish and eat our catch; what’s the point? 

    • Anonymous

      That’s some truly ‘organic’ matter you wrote gardener.  You seem to ignore that there is a upper section to this river that was once teaming with these fish and important to native heritage.  You may be seeing alewives down in Brunswick, but the issue is that they aren’t up river in any real numbers and won’t be until they stop bumping their heads on concrete.  But hey you clearly know more than the experts who have spent decades studying and understanding how rivers and fish work; you once saw fish through a viewing window.

      Your last line is my favorite. Why should anything exist that you personally don’t benefit from? Great logic.

      • Anonymous

        I was thinking the same thing. Id like to see the river restored as much as possible and Id probably never fish it. So I guess Im not a 1%.
        As far as dams go, what I support is the idea rebuilding some of these dams so they are more fish friendly as well as more efficient. They would provide some jobs while being refitted, and afterwards would produce electric power from right here in Maine while being about as eco-friendly as possible.

      • Guest

        Experts can write pro or con on any issue. It all depends who is paying them.  Rivers are to be utilized.. utopia does not and will not ever exist… Cheap electric rate has created great jobs in Madison for the Tomato industry.  Dams run mills. Native Heritage my butt. How many of the Natives live off the land 100%????  None,  they to like electricity.. The natives of old town have a ton of land in Holeb township that most have never been to and they have to pay their wardens to watch land nobody will ever go to.

        • Anonymous

          Yep, clearly the all powerful alewife lobby out spent the hydro power industry to pay off scientists to do favorable studies over multiple decades, had those studies peer reviewed by other scientists over several more decades then slipped this bogus science past reams of elected officals and state and federal agencies. It’s so obvious I don’t know how I missed it. Those alewives are tricky.

          What’s your beef with Native Americans? That was a fairly off topic and not terribly insightful rant.

          • Anonymous

            All the alewife’s are for is lobster bait.

          • Anonymous

            That’s not entirely true and I don’t believe that creating a place to harvest them upstream is one of their goals.  Many species of piscivorous fish feed on alewives, shad, herring, etc…  If there are more alewives doesn’t stand to reason to think that it may help with other sport and commercial fish species that feed on them. 

          • Anonymous

            Since the new state law barring from taking out dams on certain lakes, this will minimize there breeding grounds. No it is not about harvesting upstream but for them to multiply then harvest. It is a poor plan

          • Anonymous

            Yes because there is so much harvest of alewives on the penobscot currently, I’m sure that is exactly what they wanted.

          • Guest

            No issue with the natives.. The story plays the natives like liberals use kids in their ads, were doing it for the children. so I responded

    • Anonymous

      Point is to drive up power cost by taking dams out one at a time. Getting alewives for lobster bait., I have not seen any proof alwives have been all the way up the Penobscot. This is a farce from ecologist. Hard to believe Trout unlimited is falling for their plan. Maine has some of the most pristine Trout fishing in the State.

    • Anonymous

      NO one has or HAD any right to impede the flow of our rivers. LePage is wrong on this and so are you.

      • Anonymous

        OH and windmills is the way to go, or electric cars. Sorry to say that Hyrdo is the best way

  • Anonymous

    Another great idea from the ‘intellectually superior’ liberals who are forcing the country into collapse by way of utility rates that will necessarily skyrocket. 
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An-l4fm7ckU 

    • Anonymous

      Yeah that great liberal icon George W. Bush whose administration funded a large portion of this project. Give us break with the partisan hackery.

  • Anonymous

    “the Great Works dam removal will be the first ‘real action’ in what has become one of the largest fishery restoration projects in the history of the nation and a global model for similar restoration projects”

    what an absolute embarassment to this once great nation….

  • Anonymous

    At least the Canadians are interested in generating electricity.   

  • Anonymous

    We should be upgrading all hydro dams to produce the maximum possible electricity instead of the “pie in the sky” wind energy that only survives because of massive subsidies.  The dams produce electricity  24/7/365 and you can’t say that for wind!

    • Anonymous

      Ive been saying that on the upgrade for well over 2 years now

    • Patten_Pete

      Totally agree.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, and Northern Pike are even more tenacious

  • Anonymous

    2.78 and 1.95MW does not seem like much power. These dams were overdue for an upgrade. The remaining fishways need to more resemble the natural river and not like something designed by an accountant instead of a biologist. It will be interesting to see how this works. The old corporate thinking of “conquering nature” was ill conceived and the Army Corps of Engineers could have saved billions of tax dollars by not rushing headlong into the dam building frenzy of years ago. When the dams are removed, the workers could start dismantling the wind turbines. Think of the jobs!!

  • Patten_Pete

    NRCM = New Religion Conning Mainers

  • Anonymous

    Score another win for the radical enviromentalists. Hydropower is about as clean an energy resource as you can find, but the Luddites who want to support the candle-making and buggy-whip industry keep tearing it down. Senseless!

    • Anonymous

      Hydropower ruins rivers and makes them polluted from all the stagnant water. Id rather see nuclear and oil fired power plants.

      • Anonymous

        You woul rather pollute the air, I am sure you like windmills too.

  • Anonymous

    I have never seen a shortage of salmon on the east or west branch of the penobscot !  I catch them all the time !

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, landlocked salmon. Big deal.

  • LePage doesn’t like salmon, and shad? Phooey to them. As far as hydro power, my calculat0r says they have increased power by  226%. That’s more than double.

  • Anonymous

    ONe nuclear plant can generate more electricity than all of these dams and every wind mill in the state. I generally agree with LePage but I think he is wrong on this one.

    The potential fish stocks in our rivers have far more value than the electricity generated. If you think there isn’t value in lobster bait then think about this state without the lobster industry.

    • Anonymous

      And I am sure your liberal friends would go for a nuclear power plant. Just wait til the Northern Pike get a taste of salmon and alwives. Look at the problem the St. John Valley and Northern Maine have with another species of pike. This has a lot to do with not wanting to destroy trout fishing.

      • Anonymous

        I am sorry I don’t understand your post.  Are you saying the dams will protect the trout from pike and muskies?  

        As for my liberal friends they are not all for wind mills or dams and they are going to need electricity to plug in their electric gocarts.  Compromises will have to be made on their part and nukes are the best and least damaging alternative.

        • Anonymous

          The Howland dam will unless people like those who put Northern Pike in Pushaw do it again.
          The Howland dam is a major obstruction for them. Once PRRT gets their way, they will have free passage all the way up to the Jo Mary lake of chain and further up. Thankfully the state is preventing them to getting into Sebois and the Piscataquis area.

  • Anonymous

    Give the river a chance.
    Recall LePage.

  • Guest

    Groups like the Trust, the Conservation Law Foundation, RESTORE and Quimby are all for knocking down all the dams, and cleansing Northern Maine of its residents.

    They need to realize that if they attempt that here in Millinocket; we are ready, able and more than willing to fight a long battle. 

    So Bring It On ________

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