Comments for: Machias professor makes lobster aquaculture breakthrough

Posted June 04, 2012, at 12:56 p.m.

GREAT WASS ISLAND | Though there is no shortage of lobsters in the Gulf of Maine, some scientists and lobster fishery officials have been trying to learn how to reproduce the crustaceans in captivity. As other commercial fisheries in Maine have dwindled or nearly vanished, the amount of lobster …

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  • Guest

    Good to know that there are still some bright people left in this state.

    • Anonymous

      And I bet he believes global warming is primarily human-caused, like 97% of scientists do.

      http://content.usatoday.com/communities/sciencefair/post/2011/11/public-learning-scientists-agree-on-climate-a-game-changer/1#.T8z1JVK3xn2

      • Anonymous

        The article says “97% of ‘active’ climate scientists. . .”  It does not say 97% of all scientists!  Recently a large number of scientists took NASA to task for publishing a paper blaming people for global warming.

        • Anonymous

          Yup, and I bet they were all big fans of Rush Limbaugh;)

          • Anonymous

            And Dick Cheney.

      • Guest

        Since I know you’re so concerned with global warming, especially the man-made type, I’ve got a suggestion as to how YOU personally can do your part to mitigate the situation.  Shut your computer off immediately and have Bangor Hydro come out and disconnect your service.  This would be a true and selfless example of the rubber meeting the road.  But, I could be guilty of assumption.  Maybe all of your electricity is generated with solar or wind, but even in this case, the components you are using may have been produced in an environmentally unfriendly manner.  What about the methane that is generated from the waste that you produce and the resulting increase in greenhouse gases.  Boy, no matter how you slice it, looks like you’re part of the problem.  Hell, you couldn’t even fall on your own sword without it having a negative environmental impact.  Man, it would have been best if you had never been born, but I sure would miss your highly accurate and thought provoking comments.

        • Anonymous

          Assuming your last sentence is the sarcastic part, not the other way around:

          ————–

          Your argument:  I contribute to environmental trouble, therefore my arguments are no good or not helpful.

          Counterarugment:  you are committing a classic fallacy, which even has a name (as you probably know):  ad hominem.  By attacking the person you are ignoring the importance of analyzing the argument.  Rush Limbaugh thrives off this form of poor reasoning, masterfully raising and orchestrating his audience’s anger into pure hate.

          Your other argument:  because I am part of the problem, I can’t be part of the solution.

          Counterargument:  People can do more good than harm (or try t0), even when they are committing harmful acts.  Therefore, you’re wrong.

          ————–

          Assuming your last sentence is the non-sarcastic part (admittedly unlikely):

          Well written!  I would put a question mark after “green house gases,” but otherwise splendiferous. I might also disambiguate your sarcasm a little. You are going to confuse people.

          • Guest

            Believe it or not, I have concerns about how we impact our environment.  You can’t tell me that we are not having some effect on our planet’s ability to cool itself.  That being said, nobody knows how much.  I also recognize that the planet goes through natural cycles of heating and cooling.

            People can comment however they like.  I just think it would be nice to stay on track in this case and commend Brian Beal’s work (since this is what the article is about), so I had to mess with you a little bit.  But, that’s just me.

          • Anonymous

             Your silver-tongued cameo was a relief from the norm, and, yes,

            Congratulations, Dr. Beal!

        • Anonymous

          You can believe in global warming or not, but the fact is energy is getting expensive and the only way to make it affordable is to be more efficient. You can be a critic of hybrids and alternative energy all you want, but they will make their way into the market and eventually dominate. If the U.S. were smart, we’d be leading the way and rebuilding our economy with other forms of energy. and we’re not. Other nations are making it work as we sit back and watch.  The only thing we are a leader in is starting wars.   
          If sunbeams were weapons of war, we would have had solar energy centuries ago.

  • Anonymous

    Congratulations to Brian and to all those who contributed to this success!  Your tireless efforts and dedicated research do not go unnoticed.   Keep up the good work.  I enjoyed immensely my one-summer contribution to DEI.

  • Homer Simpson had a pet lobster named Pinchy. He ate him.

  • Anonymous

    I guess saying that it’s worthwhile to invest in R&D would be a fruitless effort…..

    • Guest

      We don’t need no stinkin’ R&D:

      “Gov. Paul LePage has vetoed a $20 million bond for research and development.”

      • Anonymous

        Dripping with buttery sarcasm (I hope)

    • Guest

      All for R&D, but who do you have in mind when it comes to paying for it?

      • cherry blossom

        Rearing lobsters is not ground breaking.  It does (self)promote the hatchery and keep the grant money flowing.

        • Guest

          No problem with grant money as long as the grant money comes from private sources.

      • Anonymous

        A society that benefits from it!

        • Guest

          I say anybody who sees the value in it and would like to voluntarily fund it.

          • Anonymous

            Although I believe I understand where you’re coming from, I would point out that anybody who has their house recently burn down would find a fire department more appealing to fund.  A person whose home has been broken into or has suffered at the hands of criminals might find funding the police force more interesting. And anyone who has a family member in the education system would likely want to fund it to a higher degree than one not in the same situation.

            But honestly, have we arrived at the point that we have no social conscience?  Is there no sense of a greater community?  Are you so comfortable in your life that you have neither an obligation to, nor a reliance on the people that you and we cohabit this space with?

            If so, may the grace of any force….be with you and us!

            Sleep well~~

          • Guest

            I don’t think it’s a case of not having a social conscience, but rather one of requiring people to fund something that they, for whatever reason, don’t want to fund.  I know that can get a little more complicated when you’re talking about safety issues such as fire fighting or ambulance service.  In this particular case though, I don’t believe that lobster hatchery R&D should come from taxpayer funding.  I’m a full-time lobster fisherman if that carries any more weight, and one who benefits from this specific hatchery.

  • Anonymous

    just what we need someone playing with mother nature with hybrid lobsters . may kill the whole works off.

    • Tyke

      Well I suppose that might be an issue …

      … if he was growing hybrid lobsters.

      He’s not. They are perfectly normal lobsters.

    • Anonymous

       Clearly you have no idea what you’re talking about. There is nothing “hybrid” about the lobsters that Dr. Beal is growing. They are natural Maine lobsters with no modifications.

  • A minor correction to note in the article:  “…as a Fulbright scholar at the University of Ireland in Galway.”  There is NO place called:  “University of Ireland in Galway”  BUT there is a place called “University College Galway”  in Ireland.

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