Comments for: Approving Bangor school budget is a no-brainer

Posted May 29, 2012, at 3:47 p.m.

The Bangor School Department’s proposed 2013 budget is not controversial. It puts forward no new costly programs and makes personnel cuts mainly through attrition. In the end, the overall proposed budget of $41,238,725 is 0.34 percent less than last year’s budget, but Bangor residents’ contribution would be about 1.9 percent …

Guidelines for posting on bangordailynews.com

The Bangor Daily News encourages comments about stories, but you must follow our terms of service.

  1. Keep it civil and stay on topic
  2. No vulgarity, racial slurs, name-calling or personal attacks.
  3. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked.
The primary rule here is pretty simple: Treat others with the same respect you'd want for yourself. Here are some guidelines (see more):

  • Bangor has excellent schools, we need to keep it that way.

    • Anonymous

       At least that’s what it says on all their publications. LOL

  • Anonymous

    People have about as much interest in this story as US history. It otta pass…nobody cares.

    • Anonymous

       I care.

  • Anonymous

    We have a popularly school board that approves the budget.  We also have a popularly elected city council that has oversight of the school budget.  We need to pass the budget by voter referendum –another half baked idea out of Augusta.  Turn out to vote, we do have excellent schools and by Augusta mandate we need to approve the budget as well. 

    • It must be nice to have such pretty Kool-Aid in the fridge.

      Maine voters, like other Americans, have the right to cast their ballots as they please, sans mandates from Augusta or city hall.

      • Anonymous

         What happens if you have a referendum and no one participates.  Who wins? We are slow getting there.  May be Kool-Aid not tea.

  • Guest

    They should cut the school budget by 10 millon dollars period.. Everyone has been cutting their household and living expenses, so should the schools.
    To many pensions at to high a price and the Bangor Schools overpay their tenured teachers… They need to take bids from a private company to run the school..
    Good luck with your budget this year. 1.9 percent increase is an increase.  the math system the schools or government uses is bogus…
    To those who think we are not paying attention, this year there will be more than 500 people voting on the budget.. last year you never notified people of the vote. this year we will

    • Anonymous

       I don’t know about Bangor’s pay scale but I can tell you that the State’s school teachers pay more than those paying into Social Security and their employers do not match it dollar for dollar as those in Social Security and the pensions average about $14,000 or less.  

      • Anonymous

        Median Teacher pay in Bangor

        2007 $52,038
        2008 $53,860
        2009 $55,610

        Thank God for maineopengov.org so we don’t have to rely on such bad information concerning public spending.

        If the teacher making median pay in 2009 started working at 25, worked as a teacher until 60, and then retired they would receive $37,685.16 per year adjusted for inflation for the rest of their lives plus the retiree health insurance benefit.  Quite a bit more than the $$14,000 you quoted.  Of course the teacher who retires isn’t making median pay, is he?  He’s making the top scale and would receive even more. 

        Either you’re one of those teachers whose only math course in college was “Math 100 – Numbers and how to write them” or you’re a union hack trying to keep the tired old myth of the overworked and underpaid teacher alive.

        • Anonymous

          I can tell you that my husband’s pension is only about $12,000 after 18 years working as a Maine educator.   I can also tell you that I’ve worked over 15 years in Maine as a teacher and I make significantly less that what you’ve quoted here.   Many teachers in Maine have come into teaching as a second career and don’t have 35 years in the retirement system.  We also lose what we paid into the Social Security system.  I’ve paid for my husband’s health insurance since he has retired, even now that he’s medicare eligible. 

          You must be one of those who like to vilify all public workers and distort the facts to make it seem like we are all retiring and living in luxury. 

          @oldmainer: This site isn’t letting me respond to your comment below, so I am editing this to respond. Stop getting everything off the web–news flash–everything you read on the Internet is not true.

          Don’t be so quick to judge me without knowing the facts. The facts I stated are true. My husband retired 11 years ago, not recently. We had to choose between lifetime survivor benefits of $8,000, $12,000 with a survivor benefit of 1/2 that amount and $16,000 with benefits ending at death. I may be slightly off but it’s approximate. Not that you deserve an explanation, but we chose the middle ground as our children were 4 and 6 years old at the time. My husband is currently 74 years old. I wish there had been a $30,000 minimum back then because we’d both be higher on the scale. I’m not sure why you are so down on teachers. I work hard. It took me 10 years to work my way through college and another 10 years before I earned my masters degree. My children see how hard I work to serve my students and to stay current in my profession. I love what I do, but the current climate of attacking teachers and public workers is taking its toll. My teenage children would never consider entering this profession because of the time, energy and commitment it takes with little compensation. (Don’t even start on the benefits–I paid over $9,000 out-of-pocket for my insurance and medical expenses last year with no major medical issues and the school district plans on reducing this benefit.) My children can put in the same amount of effort and earn more money and respect in another profession. My oldest son thinks I should move to his state because with my skills and education, I could earn at least twice as much as I earn now. You’re entitled to your opinion, but please don’t profess to know all the facts.

          • Anonymous

            Everything I posted was true.  You can look it up on the interwebs.

            If your husband’s pension is only $12,000 after 18 years then that means his average salary for the final three years of work was $33,333.  Given that by law the minimum STARTING salary for a teacher in Maine is $30,000 and teachers get mandated cost of living increases every year and step increases for longevity that seems unlikely. 

            More of those pesky facts. 

  • Anonymous

    RIP Ralph Greenleaf

  • Anonymous

    If you can blow $10,000.00 on busing for preseason softball travel on games that dont even count, you can cut your budget! Ask Mr. Vanedestine, its all true.

    • Anonymous

      They always want to cut the budget and not touch sports. Sports should be funded by the community at a level the community can afford. Sports programs are not public education. Read the other piece about how 4th graders can’t read for heaven’s sake, and then use your brains!

Similar Articles