December 17, 2017
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Comments for: Got faith? Maine the least-religious state in the nation

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  • Anonymous

    “What’s alarming about those numbers is that more than 300 years after the country was founded by people seeking religious freedom……..”
     
    This is not a correct statement.  The Massachusetts Bay Colony was founded by those seeking religious freedom.  The United States was founded by those seeking political freedom.  Many of them (Washington, Jefferson) had no church affiliation either.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t lump Washington in with Jefferson. Our first president was indeed affiliated with a church and deeply religious.

      • Anonymous

        What church was Washington affiliated with?  Washington often referred to “providence”, but was not “deeply religious” in any modern sense of the word.

      • Anonymous

         While Washington was nominally an Episc0palian (and was buried with Episcopalian rites), his writings indicate that, like Jefferson, he leaned toward Deist beliefs–rarely referencing “Christ” or “God” but referring to “Providence” or a “Grand Architect”–both Deist and Freemason terms (and many Freemasons of the era were Deists).

    • Anonymous

       Also, the Puritans and Pilgrims wanted freedom to practice THEIR faith–they proved quite intolerant of other creeds (exiling Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson and persecuting Quakers, among others).

    • Anonymous

      Try reading the Federalist and Anti-Federalist papers.
      The overwhelming theme is of a government unable to dictate the religious practices of its citizens. Despite the many things the Founders feared- they continually cited their belief that freedom of religion is the ultimate sign of political liberty. And actually, George Washington was a member of MANY churches throughout his life. While President, Thomas Jefferson referred to himself as a Christian in numerous letters, often expressing his admiration for the teachings of Jesus Christ. These were some of the most complex men in history- you can’t speak of them in such black and white terms.

      • Anonymous

        having no church affiliation does not mean they were not Christian.

        • Anonymous

          The story that we are commenting on is talking about church affiliation.

        • Anonymous

          Ah, but many of today’s conservative Christians say you have to belong to their church to “belong”.

          • Anonymous

            Not Their Church.

      • Anonymous

        I have read the Federalist Papers; I had to, numerous times.  The black and white statement that I referenced in my original post was incorrect.  While religious freedom was certainly on the minds of the founders, it was not remotely close to their sole focus.  I stand by my original thoughts.  I agree that these were complex men, but they were not religious in the same way that modern politicians claim to be.  Jefferson did say he admired Christ’s teachings.  He also questioned Christ’s divinity on many occasions.

        • Anonymous

          Interesting there is so much Christianity in the writings, and the schools then

      • Anonymous

        Thomas Jefferson was very vocal about his views on Christianity, in fact he rewrote the New Testament to remove all claims of Christ’s divinity,  and published it as “The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth”. 

        “The returning good sense of our country threatens abortion to their hopes, & they [the clergy] believe that any portion of power confided to me, will be exerted in opposition to their schemes. And they believe rightly; for I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man. But this is all they have to fear from me: & enough too in their opinion, & this is the cause of their printing lying pamphlets against me. . .” Thomas Jefferson to Dr. Benjamin Rush, Sept. 23, 1800 

        • Anonymous

           Terrific post.

        • Anonymous

          Where does it say anything about Christ and Christianity?

        • Anonymous

          While the vast majority of the founders were theists and engaged in legislation promoting the propagation of religion via schools and the publishing of the Scriptures, ol’ TJ was no friend to Christ. 

          No surprise from someone who was a serial sexual harrasser.

      • Anonymous

         Actually Jefferson wrote of Christ’s teachings without  reference to him as god.

    • Anonymous

      The Bay Colony was founded by intolerant people in search of the “freedom” to establish their own form of religious and social dominance. 

    • Anonymous

      You are right. Too many seem have a Disneyesque or early Hollywood view of that crew. The Separatists who founded Plimouth Plantation, the “Saints,” were generally seeking religious freedom, though some were along for other reasons. The community hadn’t been established long, though, before their adherence to religious liberty was limited to the liberty to practice what was approved, which, in their case was early Calvinist congregationalism. The Mass Bay outfit was seeking to remake the world, in a way. Hard-bitten Calvinists for the most part, they had run out of patience trying to purify (hence the name Puritans) with the popery and rank corruption they saw in the Church of England. Rather than take the  course of  martyrs, like the earliest Christians,  they took advantage of a corporate offer to fund the enterprise and headed to Massachusetts Bay where they sought to rebuild society according to their lights and their own imperial impulses. Religious liberty, per se, wasn’t on their list of priorities.
      In a way they weren’t very far from the true believers among us today who talk the talk of religious liberty while trying to ram their moral code down everyone else’s throat. In fact, their first imperial conquest, other than the decimation of the local native population was to dominate and eventually absorb Plimouth Plantation. And, yes, they evicted Hutchinson and Williams for their heresies, and when it suited them, sold Quakers into slavery. Quite the crowd, our stout-hearted Yankee forebears. For a  good picture based on recent scholarship, check  out  Nathaniel Philbrick’s book, “Mayflower.” It often hurts ancestor worshippers in the DAR and the Mayflower Society and other genealogical cults to know that the early immigrants were generally no more nor less human then ourselves. They were a mixed bag for sure, one that had a some constructive ideas about community and a good many destructive ones – among the worst being their belief that the whole world ought be like them. Le plus ca change, le plus c’est la meme chose!

      • Anonymous

         AWESOME post!Much applause!

    • Anonymous

      And then the Mass Bay Colony denied religious freedom to others.  That’s why Roger Williams founded Rhode Island.

      • Yes, Roger Williams held bizarre beliefs, among them that the natives should be treated as human beings, befriended and traded with honestly, rather than exploited.  He believed that each person should be free to worship in their own way, so long as they did no harm to others.  Small wonder that the Calvinists kicked him out.

        • Anonymous

           Great article in a recent Smithsonian and a new bio of Williams.Worth looking up.

        • Anonymous

           Yes and then the Brown’s of Providence became slave traders and RI became  the  most anti Catholic state in the country, not allowing immigrants who had no property to vote and generally perpetrating heinous labor practices in the Yankee- owned mills.

  • Anonymous

    What is even more troubling than non-religion is the wave of anti-religion sentiments expressed by many.

    • Anonymous

       Organized religion is it’s own, worst enemy, shunning all but those, whom they deem perfect.

      • Anonymous

        Religion has always been offered by the oppressor (read GOP in todays world) as a salve on the wounds of those who suffer the inhumanity of cultural and economic slavery.  It is the carrot on the stick, the vision of desert after eating dirt, the promise of a bonus “if you do well enough”, the dream of equality to those who must turn the other cheek to survive, the concept of salvation for those who suffer man’s inhumanity to man.”

        •  What’s wrong with hoping the world will change from its evil ways by not using violence to curtail violence? You can bet your socks that Jesus never told us that we should go out and kill people, so anyone who does so in the name of Jesus is a liar, and not a Christian.

          • Anonymous

            I have never understood how christians could go to war.

          • Anonymous

            And he told humanity to stop oppressing other human beings and to stop being the judge and jury of their fellow human beings, but many Christians want to oppress others and they spend more time judging others than loving them.

          • Anonymous

             Like Rick Perry(243 executions and proud of it)

          • Yes.

    • Anonymous

       When holier-than-thou individuals preach creeds of bigotry and intolerance, then they will draw such fire from those opposed to such sentiments. Add to that the hypocrisy rampant in many sects (e.g., vehement anti-gay rhetoric), and the anti-religious attitudes are easily sourced to the behaviors of the faithful who espouse intolerant views.

    • Anonymous

      Self-victimization is the problem.

    •  You don’t suppose that might be because of religions detrimental effect on society throughout history? Where ever Christianity went, death, grief, and pain followed. Not to mention how it stunts the growth of society.

      http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-juhrw3LJ5RY/Tg8pj8QQSLI/AAAAAAAAACI/1xNuM6EMv70/s1600/any-questions-religion-science-history-knowledge-christianit-demotivational-poster-1253813662.png

      • Anonymous

        Is it just co-incidence? Recently there was an article in Huffington Post listing Maine as the most PEACEFUL state in the the 50!

        • Yeah, that might have to do with the fact that the total population of the entire state of Maine, could fit into just about any major US city and still have room for more people. You cram everyone in the state into the size of something like Bangor or Portland, and then you’ll see an increase in crime.

          Religiosity isn’t a measure of peacefulness in the least. Jesus said we should turn the other cheek and not judge each other. If people aren’t doing what Jesus told us to do, they’re not Christian no matter how hard they try.

          • pbmann

            The more religious a society, the more violent and aggressive the society.

      • Anonymous

        and don’t forget their detrimental influence now…

      • What about Mao, Pol-Pot, Stalin, Kim Jong-Il, Che Guevara and Fidel Castro, FARC guerrilla massacre of entire Christian villages, and persecution of Christians the world over still going on to this day? http://www.persecution.com/ – Be informed.

        But this isn’t a contest to see who’s done the most blood letting. Jesus told us not to kill people, even at risk to our own lives. We’re sent out as sheep among the wolves, and any “Christian” who preaches otherwise, isn’t a Christian. It is as simple as that. You can argue until you’re blue in the face, but if it isn’t what Jesus said we should do, it is wrong.

    • Anonymous

      Gee, I Wonder why that is?I sayFreedom from religion.

    • Anonymous

      Unfortunately many of us have had toxic experiences with religion and no longer want any part in it.  Organized religion has been the cause of millions of deaths world wide.

  • Guest

    I don’t believe for a minute that less than 30% of Maine’s population are religious. Nor that the Catholic church dominates. Polls obviously are not accurate . 

    • Anonymous

      I don’t believe that either. How can they come up with such figures when not all Mainers have been polled?

      • Anonymous

        This is an explanation of how polling works.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opinion_poll
        I haven’t bothered to look at how they selected their sample, but that would be one thing to look at if you think it’s not accurate.   Also, like concernsme said, the poll is looking only at whether people belong to a particular denomination/group, not whether they’re religious.

    • Anonymous

      I think it means that less than 30% belong to a denomination or attend church. One can be a Christian, but be against the hypocrisy or organized religion.

      • Anonymous

        Well my Bible aslo says “Do not forsake the assembling together”

      • Anonymous

        Per the first part of the article, the data applies to belonging to a denomination.

      • Anonymous

        And one can not believe in Jesus and still believe deeply in God or The Creator. There are more and more spiritual people rather than religious people.

  • Anonymous

    A recent study shows that 59 percent of teenagers who grow up as church-going Christians abandon their faith in adulthood. One of the major reasons cited is the Church’s position on political issues like gay rights.

    So these short-term battles like arguing whether a catholic university should be allowed to offer sub-standard insurance policies might be great for riling people up now, ultimately it’s just alienating the religion in the long run. It starts looking more like hatefulness and when that’s what’s on display, no one will come in for the positive messages the church should be highlighting instead.

  • Anonymous

    “Salvation in the 21rst century is being a good human being” ?? Seriously?? If that’s what you’re
    counting on as your salvation…good luck.

    • Anonymous

       I was taught, being a good person, loving and caring for others, as I would care for myself.
      If that’s not enough, then I don’t want, what those like you have to offer.

    • Anonymous

      Salvation?  From what? 

    • Anonymous

      HRH how are you? Where have you been?

  • Lord Whiteman

     When my puritan ancestors landed on Plymouth rock they where looking to set up a  religious Utopian commune for themselves. They had no  

     Sad to say but they considered religious tolerance, “a liberty to tell lies in the name of  God” .. Cotton Mather.

  • Anonymous

    Thank God

  • Anonymous

    Being seen as “religious” is not the answer, nor is attending an organized service.  One’s relationship to  God through His Son Jesus Christ is the answer.  John 3:16 still holds true.

    •  John 3:16, like the rest of the bible, is a philosophy, not a truth.

      http://media.fakeposters.com/results/2009/07/28/51ewqacdcv.jpg

      • Anonymous

        …said Dane unequivocally in the most absolute terms.  Tell me, what is truth?  Who defines it? 

        I mean, besides you.

        •  Truth is when Galileo said the Sun not the Earth is the center of our universe, philosophy arrested Galileo for saying it.

          • Anonymous

            So you’re resorting to the straw man argument, I see.  Chapter and verse on where the Bible, not the Catholic church, states that the Earth is the center of the universe, please.

            Interestingly, the sun is the center of the universe?   If you said, “solar system,” I’d agree with you.  But, universe?  

            Thanks for being the arbiter of “truth” on the comment board.  Lol. 

    • Anonymous

      True, but Do not forsake the assembling together.

      • Anonymous

        The world is our church. We all assemble every day.

  • Anonymous

    Uh, Rev. Lewis…let’s not co-opt the settling of America, please. It was only partly about religious freedom. If you consider the Mayflower as the beginning, you will note that the passengers  included a significant minority of businessmen whose purpose was to establish commercial opportunities here, and couldn’t have cared less about religion…and they played a major role in the survival and success of the colony. 

    Anyway, this statistic for Maine is one I am proud of.

  • Anonymous

    There will be more people going to Hell in the name of religion than not.The Scriptures are very clear.Jesus talked and warned more people of Hell than He talked about Heaven.I definitely believe it about Maine though for sure.Sad but true.

    • Anonymous

      So, there is a ‘hell’ ?

      • Anonymous

        It exists all too often here on earth.

  • Anonymous

    Finally!!!  Maine is FIRST at something POSITIVE!!!

    THANK YOU FSM!!!

    -Atheist

    • Anonymous

      That is a matter of opinion.

      • Anonymous

        Just like belief in Jesus as god is a matter of opinion.

      • Anonymous

        And I am entitled to mine, just as you are entitled to yours.

    • Anonymous

      Ramen.

    • Anonymous

      Superb post.Religion is the drag on civilization and progress!Visit FFRF.org for more info.
      “As Maine goes,so goes the nation”Let’s hope so.Break the grip of the meddling churches,TAX THEM HEAVILY and keep them out of politics and away from our kids.

      • Anonymous

        You want to tax conscience, that is, deeply held beliefs. What you are suggesting is government control of people’s minds and activities and freedom to assemble. Be careful of what you wish for.  If this should ever happen the content of all messages will be controlled as well.

        • Anonymous

          Just what is so wonderful about “deeply held beliefs”?  I’m sure you think that your “deeply held beliefs” make you devout, while the “deeply held beliefs” of suicide bombers make them fanatical. “Deeply held beliefs” generally seem to provide a fig-leaf for bigotry and intolerance.  “Deeply held beliefs” usually consist of an unquestioning adherence to medieval values and ignorance.

        • Anonymous

           Nice try.WRONG.If I pay $$ to a business,I can choose to spend my $$ there or not depending on what their political leanings are.Churches have gotten a free ride for centuries,yet still go where they don’t belong in reproductive choice and everything else.

        • Anonymous

          Poster’s words are code for “we want the christian base to go away, so our permissive lifestyle can move in the direction we want without scrutiny”.

          • Guest

             Ever notice how the all powerful, all knowing God has trouble handling money, always seems to need money…………..

          • Anonymous

            Sounds like the government!!

          • Anonymous

             Except the government provides me with usable services.

          • Anonymous

             Look up Chuck Grassley’s feeble questioning of big $$ preachers.That got squashed in a  hurry.These con men deserve to be in jail and all their assets confiscated.

    • I’m not “religious”, but I still believe in the God of the bible. I don’t go to church, but that hasn’t stopped me from loving and trusting God.

      These ministers that are so concerned about people who are “affiliated” with a church are just looking at numbers, not people’s hearts. Maybe there are more people who aren’t affiliated with any church, but believe just the same? Raw data can some times be deceiving.

      • Anonymous

        why in particular the ‘God of  the bible’  …. just curious

        • Simply put, in binary terms, either God exists or he doesn’t. I choose
          to believe that God exists on a daily basis. It’s a struggle at times, but I keep believing because– Jesus is the only person, who (if we are to believe the bible as spiritual truth) said that we don’t have to do good things to enter heaven, but believe only and we are saved.

          Many religions, even ones that are falsely associated with Christianity such as ancient Egyptian paganism (a’la “Zeitgeist” movement/film) teach us that when we die we are judged by our good and bad deeds, and then reincarnated accordingly. An immortal soul.

          Christianity teaches us that we have a *mortal* soul, one that is liable to die. Evil thoughts eventually lead to evil actions. We are judged by our intent, not necessarily by the actions themselves, though such evil actions do weigh heavily upon us as the sin piles up. Though we think we do good deeds, many a war was started over good intentions. I mean, if you ask Stalin or Hitler if they think they were doing a good thing, they’d tell you YES.

          That’s scary, but it is why Jesus told us that we are saved by our faith and not by works. I mean, we make a big joke about John 3:16, it’s even in pop culture references… But what does John 3:16 really mean?

          “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

          Exactly what it says it means, and it is beautiful.

          • Anonymous

            And Zen Buddhism believes that we are all one.   I like that.

          • The great thing about free will, is you can do whatever you want, even if it isn’t what God intended you to do.

            The great thing about forgiveness is, if you find out that you are wrong, Jesus already paid your debt. You don’t have to do anything to “earn” your way into heaven, except admit that you can’t get into heaven by yourself.

            But I respect your choice, even if I believe it to be a choice in error. I don’t mind discussing differences in the belief systems, but I will never tell you that you’re going to go to hell for that… I am not the judge of that, and I have no idea what God’s plan for you is.

          • Anonymous

            I haven’t made a choice but I do not believe that anyone in this life can know God’s plan, or even if a plan exists. I know that you believe that you do know and that is your faith.  I respect that.  We are,  at least most of us, sinners of one sort or another at one time or another.  I accept that and do not feel that my errors will deny me entrance to an afterlife, whatever that may or may not be.  I always try to do better, to become more aware and to accept my own and others’ human frailties .

          • Oh well…if there is a God/Goddess, He, She, It is  pretty sadistic and ain’t no friend of mine or others. I have heard every lame ” Bible believing” explanation for this crap world we live in so spare me the rehearsed message from  Josh  McDowal or John McArthur, or Jim Dobson.

          • Uhhh, I honestly have no idea what you’re talking about. Please don’t assume anything about me….

          • Anonymous

            I assume that, considering you started off with “I’m not religious” and then went on to outline a personal faith that coincides almost exactly with mainstream Christianity, you’re either a bit confused about what the word “religious” means, or else you’re cleverly using the rhetorical device of asserting the existence of something that you had previously denied.

          • Religiosity/Religion is a set of rules to live by. Jesus isn’t a religion, he’s a way of life.

            ***
            In reply to DocPenfro below:

            Islam is a cancer. It operates the same way the Mafia does. It’s a cult.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIJf4jsqWLs
            (~4 min video of woman speaking about Islam on some TV show. You can almost bet a Fatwa has been issued against this poor woman for speaking out against Islam).

          • Anonymous

            Islam is generally regarded as a ‘way of life’ by its adherents.  Are you telling me that you don’t regard Islam as a religion, either?

          • you will be spared.. but it won’t be to your liking.. you have absolutely nothing to lose by searching out Christ in your life… it’s a no brainer even for you.. try it.. read up on accepting Christ.. do it just so that you have a better argument why you don’t believe in this crap… cause right now your argument is lame … there is no meat in it no real ” matter” in it.. so learn to argue your point with facts;; that takes some study… google… accepting Christ as your savior ..and learn.. you will be surprised how little pain there is to it

          • Anonymous

             “you will be spared.. but it won’t be to your liking..”

            Well. This is YOUR belief. There are those that do not agree and that makes us no more wrong than you are right.

          • Jesus died because he was gaining followers, or what we would call “political” power today. Those who were already in power weren’t really in the mood to share it, so they took care of the problem. It was easy to rewrite the story to one of him dying for our sins 400 years after his death. They just used a little literary license.

          • Anonymous

            And you know this because…?  Jesus died 1) because He presented a kingdom that was spiritual in nature and it wasn’t received by the religious leaders of the day.  They wanted to throw off the shackles of Rome, not participate in a revival; 2) because it was God’s plan to redeem humanity to Himself. 

          •  And you know this because….? The bible tells you so? You mean that book that was written 400 years after the events? Prior to the “official” bible, Christians did not celebrate Jesus as an immortal, he was a man. It took a rewrite of the facts to turn him into a god.

          • Anonymous

            Got your facts wrong, Dane.  Not surprising, when you dogmatically state that the sun is the center of the universe.  Church councils only officially recognized the canon of Scripture, written centuries before, around AD 397.  OT books were recognized as Scripture by secular writers such as Josephus during the 1st century AD. NT books were mentioned by late 1st century and early 2nd century church fathers in correspondence. 

          • Anonymous

             And it was all rewritten by men to disparage women’s contributions..Look up the Lost Gospels or the Original Order Bible.Fascinating.

          •  Yea, poor Mary Magdalene got called a “street walker” (not sure the word filter will let me use the ‘who–‘ version) for a few thousand years because she dared to have an opinion on the subject.

          • Anonymous

            You have absolutely no idea what you’re talking about.  Women and their contributions are featured prominently in Scripture.

          •  Matthew was definitely written in the “eyewitness period”…

          • buddhism is not a religion

          • Anonymous

            “Jesus is the only person, who (if we are to believe the bible as spiritual truth) said that we don’t have to do good things to enter heaven, but believe only and we are saved.”

            Not true.

            “Not all people who sound religious are really godly. They may refer to me as ‘Lord,’ but they still won’t enter the Kingdom of Heaven. The decisive issue is whether they will obey my Father in heaven. On judgment day, many will tell me, ‘Lord, we prophesied in your name and cast out demons in your name.’ But I will reply, ‘I never knew you. Go away; the things you did were unauthorized.” (Matthew 7:21-23)

            “A good person produces good words from a good heart, and an evil person produces evil words from an evil heart. And I tell you this, that you must give an account on judgment day of every idle word you speak. The words you say now reflect your fate then; either you will be justified by them or you will be condemned.” (Matthew 12:34-37)

            “For I, the Son of Man, will come in the glory of my father with his angels and will judge all people according to their deeds.” (Matthew 16:27)

            (New Living Translation)

          • Oh let’s not get into the “holier-than-thou” junk, it only creates divisions. Lest we argue, let me say what I mean when I say “believe only and be saved” —

            That if we believe, we literally try to do everything pleasing to God, which includes following His commandments. Love of God is the first and greatest commandment, according to Jesus, and upon that one thing hangs the rest of the laws.

            So to “believe” is to know and love God, not just the parts you want to believe. Those who have been forgiven, have their evil deeds erased from the books. Though our sins be as bright as crimson, they are made as white as snow.

            The only people who are judged to go into the lake of fire are they who didn’t repent, who knowingly worked against God. With judgment also comes rewards, and all who are a part of the body of Christ have the same reward: Heaven.

          • Anonymous

            Ah, the old works vs. faith arguement.  Salvation is a gift, whether or not we choose to accept it.  A gift, you can’t work or pay for it.  However, we should show grtatitude by living a Christ-like life, with true agape love for all, for he intended for us to acheive heaven on earth.

          • Washington County

             The word believe means Trust (trust in Christ)

          • Anonymous

             I think you meant “liable” not “libel”GREAT posts though-

          •  Thank you, and yes you are right. Corrected for clarity.

          • Anonymous

             NP.Have a great day!

          • Washington County

             Very true. Saved by faith

      • Anonymous

        I totally agree with you. I too believe in God, I put my trust in God but I don’t attend a church. Why? Well… I’ve attended and even was a member of several different denominations – Catholic, Methodist, Presbyterian, Wesleyan Presbyterian, Baptist and I think that’s all.  I love God but I don’t love the hypocrisy I see in so many churches.  One such hypocrisy is this… 

        The Southern Baptists believe that being gay is THE carnal sin – the only sin that God can’t forgive.  God can forgive prostitution, child abusers, murderers, thieves but not gay people.  I’m not gay and am not giving any opinion about gay or straight people.  This is purely an example of something that doesn’t make sense to me.  

        I spoke candidly with more than one Southern Baptist in the 7 years that I lived in Florida, dead smack in the middle of the Bible Belt.  I asked several of them individually if they would reject their own child if their child was gay.  Believe it or not about 95% of the people I spoke to about this solidly believed that God was telling them not to associate with Gay people even if it meant turning your back on your child forever and condemning them as the ultimate sinner.  

        I could never do that because that is one thing I disagree with… I don’t believe that it is a sin (maybe abnormal – but not a sin) and even if I believed it were a sin I don’t believe God is telling anyone to judge anyone else or to shun anyone.  Instead it is my believe that God wants us all to be accepting of one another’s differences.  He isn’t asking us to find forgiveness in our hearts for a pedophile and to reject all contact forever with gay people – even if that gay person is your own parent, child or life-long friend.  It just seems to me that it isn’t Godmaking these judgments against people but rather the preacher teaching the congregation to be less accepting of other people who do not belong to their church, who do not share the same beliefs. Personally I don’t think God intended for any of us to do His job. 

        But, that said, I am not at all opposed to attending a church that does not practice these hypocricies and in fact I think it’s excellent to introduce children to religion early – to give them exposure to faith and God because one day they will need to decide for themselves how they feel about religion and spirituality.   

        I also have no problem understanding and accepting that some people do not believe in God. I’ve attended churches that would totally reject a non-believer… but I personally believe that goes against the teachings of God.

        • Anonymous

          I just have one comment: While God is loving and is indeed the source of all love, sin is essentially a rejection of Him. Thus if He says prostitution is sinful, you must reject prostitution. Just because He is love does not mean one can go on sinning (therefore rejecting Him) and expect to be in the receiving end of His life-giving grace. I also suggest you read the New Testament again about unnatural relations, etc. I believe the teaching is quite clear about homosexuality. By this of course, I am referring to the practice, not the orientation.

          • Anonymous

            Actually I have read the New Testament more than once.  I am not at all a stranger to the church.  I spent almost a decade living in a Catholic Orphanage.  Here, life IS about church. As for sin… to reject prostitution does NOT mean to condemn the prostitute.  On the contrary – God teaches us to forgive and invite all people into His house (the church).  Just as to reject homosexuality is NOT to condemn the homosexual.  God did not ask us to condemn anyone or judge anyone on his behalf.  He is certainly capable of judging all of us and whether we admit it or not, we all are sinners.  Neither God nor the Bible suggests that we should compare sins and decide which ones are unforgivable and yet, particularly with the Baptist faith, I have repeatedly heard Baptists say that God expects them to reject and condemn homosexuals.   

            Another point I’d like to make is that the Bible was written and re-written by man.  Much of man’s injected beliefs and prejudices are evident within the pages of the Bible. 

            Having been an orphan and having started my life living pretty much living inside a church I later lived in the homes of people who were staunchly Methodist, Presbyterian, Wesleyan Methodist and then I married a Baptist. I also spent one full night when I was about 17 years old listening to a Jehovah Witness who was a friend of the woman I was babysitting for.  

            I feel blessed to have had the unique opportunity to see how each denomination interprets the bible and I can tell you – they do not interpret all the same, not even close.  I also know that God doesn’t care where or when I worship him… I don’t have to worship on Sunday in a church. I can worship and spread the word of God in my daily life regardless of which day of the week it is and regardless of where I am.  Now that may seem to be a sin in the eyes of some church-goers who truly believe those who fail to sit in the pews of a church of their own denomination on Sunday morning will not make it into heaven. I smile when ever I hear that and simply respond… then I am a sinner. The truth is I’m secretly hoping that one day they will come to understand that faith is not at all about a building or one day a week and I can still make it to heaven if I worship God in my daily life.  I’m glad I’ve had the opportunity to experience several different religious denominations – each has the same basic goal even if they don’t know it!

          • Anonymous

            Judging from your comment I assume you don’t disagree with my prior comment.

          • Anonymous

            No, I don’t disagree at all.  

        • Anonymous

           I too have lived in FL and couldn’t wait to get out of there.Those people are truly scary.
          The lack of education coupled with wild eyed fanaticism is not to be believed.I wish I still had the news clipping about the death of a snake handler.There were KIDS right next to him!

        • Anonymous

          You are right on.  I do attend church regularly, and, yes, there are hypocrites there. However, hypocrites can be found everywhere you go.  For me, the appeal in attending church is to associate with people who share my beliefs. Many churches also provide  some of the best opportunities to get involved in charitable outreaches to the community.  As far as sin & sinners go, we are supposed to hate the SIN, not the sinner.  I figure it is not my duty to punish anyone who sins, that will be taken care of by God.

          • Anonymous

            Absolutely April – we are supposed to hate the sin and not the sinner but all too often this is not understood.  Church-goers are far more likely than those who don’t attend church regularly to condemn the sinner and flash their “I’m right because I sit in a pew every week and you don’t” badge of proof that they are somehow more accepted by God.  

            Don’t get me wrong, I have absolutely nothing against church goers who are truly there for the right reasons.  Those who truly understand that it’s not about attending service on Sunday, but instead it’s about doing your best to follow God’s guidance every day of your life.  

            As for hypocrites everywhere – You bet there are!!  But while political hypocrites bother me, and financial hypocrites bother me, for whatever reason religious hypocrites bother me most.  It really gets under my skin when I hear church goers preaching to others about how they should live their lives, shunning them and suggesting that others do the same or chastising others for differences in beliefs. It really bugs me when these people use their perceived “direct line to God” as a shield of proof that they are somehow superior to others as a result of attending church on Sunday.  It is THAT type of hypocritical behavior really rubs me wrong.  I don’t like it when church goers use God and/or their attendance at church for the purpose of self promotion.  

            Maybe it’s my early upbringings that make this type of hypocrite stand out most to me… I’m not sure.  And while I don’t enjoy any type of hypocritical behavior – religious hypocritical behaviors rub me so wrong that they can actually keep me away from a church.  And for the record, it’s not only the people in the congregation that I’m speaking about… I’m including preachers, priests, nuns, deacons and other so-called representatives of God who preach the word of God while violating vulnerable members of their congregation. 

      • Anonymous

        You can’t fully believe in the bible and live out its teachings, and not be part of a church or a community of faithful followers of Jesus Christ. What you are doing essentially is separating yourself from the Christian community of faith. Certainly that’s not what Christians of the early church did. Rather, they sacrificed and even gave up their lives so they could remain united to the community with Jesus as the head. Look at what the early believers did: Acts 2, 42.

        • Anonymous

           Bull. I don’t need a man between me and god. Church is just a social club.

          • Anonymous

             The men are EXACTLY what gets in the way.They’ve subjugated women and children as well as unbelievers in the most horrible ways imaginable.We’ve got some 80 year old mumbling in Rome because Katherine wouldn’t pay him any attention in CCD class in 1926.

        • I can be a Christian while outside of church and with my neighbors, too.

    • Anonymous

      The story says that 40% of Mainers pray daily. That stat doesn’t seem to jive with the rest of the article so could that possibly be untrue, or is it likely a typo? Perhaps the number could be derived by including those who might pray to, say, a lizard and not necessarily a deity. I’m amazed by the 40% number.

      • Anonymous

         The study itself could be flawed.Those who answer to “no religion”are the fastest growing subset.Those who are making fortunes off this scam are terrified that people will wake up.

      • Anonymous

        Not necessarily.  The number of people who pray daily can well exceed the number of those belong to a religious denomination.  They’ve given up on organized religion or don’t participate for a number of reasons.

        • Anonymous

           That’s certainly true.Depending on how things were phrased(push polling)someone might say they pray/attend services even if they don’t just to “fit in”especially in a public setting.Atheists are a huge and fast growing group,yet are usually marginalized or scorned.49% of Americans would vote for a qualified atheist Presidential candidate.Now we need one.

    • Anonymous

      It’s strange you should celebrate the lack of real hope, which is what atheism is about. I know this because I walked down that path for many years. For those of you who think it’s the easiest path, you’re deeply mistaken because it offers no lasting hope. It is a path of loneliness that only offers temporary pleasure and relief. As someone once told me, I once looked for happiness but found none. Later I sought Jesus Christ and found true happiness.

      • B Q

        Thanks for the heavy dose of condescension. It’s attitudes like this that drive people away from religion (or, at the very least, have certainly kept me far, far away from it).

      • Anonymous

        Personally I think being an atheist is the hardest path, not the easiest one. Believing in yourself and your fellow human beings takes more strength than behaving in a certain manner because a book or priest told you to. Personal accountability takes on a whole new level of meaning when there is no promise of heaven or a threat of hell. The finality of death takes a bit more courage when you know there is no afterlife or reincarnation.

        On a social level, things are just as difficult, at least in this country. A black president was a huge step, but I think we’ll see a woman president and many other minorities in that position long before we see an atheist president (at least an admitted one). Despite the nature of this article, most of this country is still deeply religious and has a profound impact on the lives of everyone, whether they are religious or not. My atheism is something that I rarely share with others that I do not know really well as it will usually get you labeled in a negative manner.

        • Anonymous

          But what hope does atheism offer in this life if not beyond the grave? I’ve walked both paths. Before I had faith I had no center in my life. Rather I had many conflicting centers besides my bumbling self. No, I don’t depend on a priest or clergyman to determine what I need to believe. My faith in a loving God is far greater than my fear of eternal damnation.

          Incidentally, how do you know there is no afterlife, or is this just an assumption? Does not the possibility of its existence not ever cross your mind? You just told me atheism is a difficult path, and I agree. But I must ask (rhetorically), why are you concerned for things of the earth (i.e., a black as president, the need for a woman and atheist president, etc.) if you are so certain that your life will cease some day? After all, if you die and cease to exist in any way, as you seem to say, then what happens on earth should not really matter to you, am I not right?

          • Anonymous

             Personally, I was very religious for 20 years. I’m much happier now with no religion in my life than I ever was before. I live my life thinking that if there’s an afterlife, that’s fantastic, but if not, there’s nothing I can do about it. I’m not an atheist by any means. I just don’t care about religion (or anti-religion), the afterlife, ghosts, or anything like that. It’s freeing, and I don’t feel like I’ll be punished for trying to live a good life without praising God every day. In fact, I like that I’m doing good deeds for the sole reason of doing good deeds, and not to try to earn my way to a better condo in Heaven.

            I have nothing against believers, such as yourself, as long as you don’t try to push beliefs on me. That’s where too much of the conflict between believers and non-believers happens.

          • Anonymous

            You are not right. Just because I may be dead and gone does not mean that my actions had no meaning. I have loved ones, children, for whom I want to make a better future. I choose to live my life as a good person because it improves the lives of the people around me, or the country I live in. I would rather live my life as if every minute were the last one, with no hereafter, than to be worrying whether or not I’m passing some sort of test to get through the Pearly Gates. 

            In other words, I would rather live my life as a good person knowing that it made the world a better place, than to be a good person so that I could have a wonderful afterlife (if one did exist…which I don’t think it does).

      • “I was dead for millions of years before I was born and it never inconvenienced me a bit.”
        ― Mark Twain

      • Anonymous

         lack of hope? Not at all.
        “The only position that leaves me with no cognitive dissonance is
        atheism. It is not a creed. Death is certain, replacing both the
        siren-song of Paradise and the dread of Hell. Life on this earth, with
        all its mystery and beauty and pain, is then to be lived far more

        intensely: we stumble and get up, we are sad, confident, insecure, feel
        loneliness and joy and love. There is nothing more; but I want nothing
        more.”

        -Christopher Hitchens

        I manage to love life just fine, even without an unjustified belief that it is eternal.

      • Anonymous

        I find faith in Thor, he is as real as Jesus but he is also an Avenger.  Jesus was never a superhero, so lame!  

    • Anonymous

      Less religion and we have a state getting more screwed up as we speak. I am not seeing this “positive” thing.

    • Anonymous

       Hey, careful. FSM  knows your thoughts and actions….

    • I,ll pray for you

    • Anonymous

      Because I am not religious does not mean I do not believe in God…I believe but I also do not believe in giving to some church where the people preaching are wearing gold jewelry…driving expensive cars and claiming if they don’t get a million dollars they are going to die.

      I practice my beliefs in private…not as in a organized religion

  • Guest

    Sounds like we are the smartest state in the nation by the sounds of it…not willing to be led around by the church.

  • i’m glad we dont have that many right right evangelical nut jobs in maine

    • Anonymous

       But they are certainly overrepresented in the Leg.Throw the bums out!

    • Anonymous

      One is too many.

  • Conley Raye

     I am Spiritual ( seeks understanding ) not religious (seeks rewards)

    • Anonymous

      Hmm.  Seeking “rewards’ is not ncessarily a definition of religious.

      • Anonymous

        They are seeking an eternal reward or fear an eternal punishment, where spiritual people don’t focus on the next world but instead focus on the present moment and live their lives accordingly.

  • Anonymous

    Let’s see if I have this right:  Most rural population, oldest median age population, least religious state in the nation, and fastest growing addiction rate to oxycontin…

    • Anonymous

      lol, like a lack of religion progresses the aging process?

      • Anonymous

        And promotes addiction?  LOL

    • Anonymous

       And usually the older people are MORE religious with less drug use.Go figure.

  • Anonymous

    “As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion…” John Adams (Treaty of Peace and Friendship between the United States of America and the Bey and Subjects of Tripoli of Barbary)

    • I love how liberals quote the king of whack jobs, owner of slaves, and adulterer; every time they want to snub religion.

      • Anonymous

        Adams signed it, Wayne. Don’t forget to denigrate that founder. Or the entire body of the Senate, who voted for it.

        • Adams signed Jefferson’s right to own slaves and have sex with them?

      •  You do realize that the entire reason you get to make a moronic comment like that, and not get punished in some way shape or form, is because of “whack jobs” like Jefferson, right?

        • No, it’s because of people like my son who fight for YOUR right to have the right to NOT believe in God.

          •  No, I’m pretty sure the right to free speech was given by the founders long before your son was born. Also, if your son is currently fighting, he is not defending any rights of mine as there is no threat to the Constitution at the moment.

          • Then move the hell out of this country.  Maybe someone with a towel on his head will fight for your consitution over there.  Or maybe some Russian soldier will fight for your right to say stupid crap like you just did.  It is sick, twisted, disrespectful wackos like you that have destroyed this countyry since the hippies were allowed to take over.

          • What an angry little man.

          • There is no current threat to the Constitution, therefore there is no need to fight to protect it. Vietnam is the same thing, many brave people fought and died in that war, but even after we lost, the Constitution stood. Why? Because the war was not an attack on the Constitution. Donning a uniform and going to a war does not automatically mean you are defending the Constitution.

          • Anonymous

             Wow!  There are a LOT of threats to the Constitution these days, starting with the NDAA  of 2012 then moving on to a population that doesn’t even know the Constitution and is willing to let the government and corporate interests run roughshod over it.

            That said, I think you are saying that there are no military threats, external to this country, to the Constitution and on that, I agree.

          •  Yes, totally agree, the biggest threats to the Constitution in my lifetime have come from within, The Patriot Act and such.

          • Preston Nethercutt

            Wayno, what an angry, arrogant, self righteous statement.  If you think you are defending Christianity or honoring the military service of your son and others, you are sadly mistaken. You have sullied both with your toxic rant. 

          • Anonymous

            Talk about stupid crap. Are you even reading what you are writing?

          • Anonymous

            Such a shame that you cling to the same bronze age beliefs as the people holding the  “Thank God For Dead Soldiers” signs at military funerals. I bet your son would be proud.

          •  Logic isn’t a part of his arsenal.

      • Anonymous

        Ok, how about from a Republican against slavery?

        “My earlier views at the unsoundness of the Christian scheme of salvation and the human origin of the scriptures, have become clearer and stronger with advancing years and I see no reason for thinking I shall ever change them.”[Abraham Lincoln, letter to Judge J.S. Wakefield, after the death of his son Willie]

        • Hmmm, and this is also the guy who was in the White House when the US Mint started putting “IN God We Trust” on coins.

          • Anonymous

            Two things. First;
             ” In 1873, Congress passed the Coinage Act, granting that the Secretary of the Treasury “may cause the motto IN GOD WE TRUST to be inscribed on such coins as shall admit of such motto.”
             Lincoln was shot In April 1865.

            Second;
            “A law passed by the 84th Congress (P.L. 84-140) and approved by the President on July 30, 1956, the President approved a Joint Resolution of the 84th Congress, declaring IN GOD WE TRUST the national motto of the United States. IN GOD WE TRUST was first used on paper money in 1957,”

            I think Lincoln was gone by the time “In God We Trust”  was adopted….  True it appeared on and off for almost 80 years on some coins, but Lincoln had nothing to do with it. 

          • “Another Act of Congress passed on March 3, 1865. It allowed the Mint Director, with the Secretary’s approval, to place the motto on all gold and silver coins that “shall admit the inscription thereon.”  Lincoln was killed in April

          • Anonymous

            The words “In God We Trust” first appeared on the US 2 cent piece in 1864 as a result of an act of Congress on April 22, 1864. It was as a result of many requests from Northerners who wanted a statement of religion during the Civil War. Obviously God hated the South since the North won. LOL

          • Anonymous

            One can believe in God and have no part in Christianity. Many people believe in God but do not believe in Christ or Christianity. Christians aren’t the only people who believe in God.

      • Anonymous

        But I do love a good TJ quote…
        I do not find in orthodox Christianity one redeeming feature.” [Thomas Jefferson]

        • Of course he wouldn’t.  He was a guy who owned slaves and slept with them behind his wife’s back. 

          • He was very much in love with his wife and faithful. He promised her, while she lay dying from complications due to child birth, he would never remarry. He was devastated by her death and mourned her death for years afterward. It wasn’t until some time after that that he began a relationship with Sally Hemmings. There was never any talk or proof that he had a relationship with any other slave. While they were together, he treated Sally with great respect. I love how people feign knowledge they don’t really possess.

    • Anonymous

      jd, this is a good one, but it’s not Jefferson. It was written by a diplomat, read on the floor of the US Senate and passed unanimously.  Then signed by John Adams.  So take that, Wayne.  Is Adams a whack job too?

      • Anonymous

        You are correct. I should have read a little deeper… 

        “Now be it known, That I John Adams, President of the United States of America, having seen and considered the said Treaty do, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, accept, ratify, and confirm the same, and every clause and article thereof.”

      • Anonymous

        He did sign it just the same.

  • Anonymous

    “When a religion is good, I conceive it will support itself; and when it does not support itself, and God does not care to support it, so that its professors are obliged to call for the help of the civil power, ’tis a sign, I apprehend, of its being a bad one.”
    Ben Franklin-Poor Richard’s Almanac- 1754

  • With a state full of left-wing liberals, what do we expect.  Many folks in this state are more worried about their rights, their opinions being all that counts, not having anyone to answer to, and being able to stir the pot, than having any faith in something.  And they say conservatives are control freaks.

    • Anonymous

       I worry about the right of those who unlike myself have to still fight for their rights.As a white male heterosexual I’ve never had a right taken from me but my gay sisters and brothers(and nearly all of my sisters)suffer discrimination often with the well funded support of mainline churches.And gays have never hurt me but Christian conservatives certainly do each and every day.

      • And what fight is that?  The right to marry?  That right is for a man and a woman, I don’t care WHAT religion you want to pick.  Muslim, Buddhism, Christian, Judiasm, etc., etc., all view male/female as marriage.  If it wasn’t for a male and a female, you, your brothers, your sisters, and their partners would not be here fighting for their “rights.”  And those churches you claim to have “hurt” you every day are just standing up for what they believe in, and that’s belief is, “marriage between a man and a woman.” 

        • Anonymous

          Since when do churches dictate what is law in our country?

          • Anonymous

            exactly

          • WOW!  Are you kidding me??!!  In God We Trust on our money.  “Under God” in the pledge.  Our President repealing part of his joke known as Obamacare after the Catholic Church stood up for what is right.  The constant fight to prvent same-sex marriage.  Should I keep going?

          • You’re a prime example of religious ignorance. People are born gay and their sexuality is controlled by their chromosomes and they should be able to be who they are and enjoy the same rights everyone else possess. Who the hell are you to decide the rights of others. You want this country to make decisions based on mythology, you’re a real genius. You should try getting a real education, but I doubt you have the capacity.

        • Anonymous

          You know Wayno, the more I read of your posts, the more I realize you must have been indoctrinated at a very young age. 
          “If you could reason with religious people, there would be no religious people” -Hugh Laurie (House M.D.)

          • Well said!

          •  “Isn’t it interesting… religious behavior is so close to being crazy, we can’t tell them apart” – Hugh Laurie (House, M.D.)

          • See above

          • House-the show that just got canceled.  Christianity-been around for over 2000 years.

          • Anonymous

            As it appears that you were as well, jd.  No better greenhouse for indoctrination than the secular humanist environment of government education. 

            Interesting that you postulate that reason and religion are at odds with each other, when reason is the by-product of intelligence and secularism demands a naturalistic explanation to origins and human development.    Trouble is, naturalism has no way to explain the origin and use of reason, thought, intellect, emotion and will other than that they’re random chemical reactions over which you have no control. 

            So…help me with that reason thingy.  Problem is, your response will be merely the by-product of more chemical reactions…and who’s to say that your chemical processes are more valid than anyone else’s?

          • Anonymous

            “Trouble is, naturalism has no way to explain the origin and use of reason, thought, intellect, emotion …”
            And religion does?

          • Anonymous

            Yup!  Created in the image of an intelligent, rational Creator who gave us the ability to think, reason, express emotion and possess a free will.

            Free will is impossible in the evolutionary model.  Mankind would be subject to the impersonal chemical processes and reactions that would dictate our every move.

        • Anonymous

          Some cultures that you write about allow for multiple wives. And long before the Bible preached about one man and one wife, there were plural marriages. So if male/female is the only criteria, how about several males and one female? How about several females and one male? And yes, there are societies who recognize marriage between males. For you to limit the choice to one between only religious groups says that you only recognize religious marriage. Good for you, but like the old saying goes, who died and left you king?

          Also, you don’t know anything about Hinduism or Buddhism. It shows when you write that they only approve of male/female marriage. Hinduism is not monolithic. It has no pope, no governing councils, etc. Some hindu organizations perform same sex marriages, most don’t.

          So far as Buddhism, again, there are no governors, but Buddhism counsels that sex is something to overcome, that any sex for pleasure is temptation that should be avoided, and that any use of the hands for sex is not good.

          I’m guessing that you would choose to withdraw your post that everybody in the world except for a few gay-agenda Americans are against same sex marriage. Quit worrying what the neighbors are doing in the bedroom. It’ll drive you to use your hands for somethings even the Buddhists say is naughty.

        • Anonymous

          Procreation is not the only reason to get married (even though the RCs and many conservatives seem to think so).

          • So you believe in single parenthood?  The main cause for children going on to commit crime.

          • You are the leading distributor of crapola.

          • Preston Nethercutt

            Wayno-you just can’t help yourself , can you? In an earlier reply to one of your rants I said you were angry, arrogant, and self righteous. I now must add that there is a glaringly obvious comparison between your  intellect and and any random box of rocks. Hang it up Bub.

        • Anonymous

          Last I knew religious dogma was  not to be interjected into politics since not everyone is religious. And great that you mentioned the definition of marriage as honored in several religions, but as the poll says, a large number of our citizens do not follow the dogma and doctrine of any religion.

          Why should religious values and definitions be forced on people who do not belong to any of these religions?

          • A large number of citizens in a state that is slowly becoming the joke of the country with all of it’s liberal carnage.

          • Anonymous

            The only one causing us to look like a joke is Paul LePage. He is the one continually in the national news. We are being laughed at and its not because of liberals. It is because of this man who is a conservative Republican.

      • Anonymous

        Well said.  If you don’t like gay marriage, don’t get one. 

    • Guest

      ….

      • Anonymous

        But they aren’t worried in the least about future heating bills, Gadael.  Where they’re heading, it’ll be plenty warm.

        • Guest

          —-

      • This state hasn’t been run this good in decades.  Oh yea, liberals have been in control for decades

    •  Not believing in god because there is not a shred of any legitimate proof or that it doesn’t even begin to make any logical sense, makes you a left-wing liberal only concerned with your own selfish  desires. WOW! I call it being an educated intellectual that doesn’t except anything out of faith because I require facts and proof. And because I don’t wear a cowbell around my neck and allow myself to be led around like cattle because I’m too stupid to think for myself and question everything makes me a bad guy. I guess ignorance is bliss.

      • Want proof?  Every spring the grass turns green and the trees grow leaves.  Every night there are stars in the sky.  The sun comes up, and the moon follows.  Science changes all the time.  25 years ago we didn’t have DNA to prove crimes.  100 years ago we had no penecillian for infections.  And yet scientists believe in “facts” as you do.

        • That’s not proof that there is a superior being, take a science class and you would fail miserably with that mentality. If you have a theory or an opinion, you have to be able to plug it into a scientific method of testing and prove it with legitimate facts. You believe the grass turns green because of god, but you can’t prove it. You spout facts with nothing to back them up.

        • Anonymous

          So the proof is because you say so, it is true. You have no proof.

    • Anonymous

      Seems to me lately that Maine is too full of ultracanservatives, vocal at least.

  • Anonymous

    Time the religious folks took a few geology and archeaology courses and you might realize that this recent 2000 year old scheme of myths to control your minds with fear is the slickest scheme ever invented by modern day man. You also might come to realize that your accidental place of birth is what caused you to believe in your particular brand of religion.And if you read a little about the History of Civilization (a mere 7000 years old) you might come to know that the Greeks, the most educated culture at the time, insisted that there were a dozen gods when most men of scientific intelligence know today that there is no such thing as a god except in the minds of those who think their brains are capable of grasping and comprehending all that is. And please, I don’t need any rebuttal from a myth believer who wishes and wants to believe that there are such places as heaven and hell where angels and devils abound.

    • Anonymous

      Bill, then you should of not written. Many gods, only one true God. Believing is not grasping, I do believe so that dispels “wants to”. The myth is believing you came from an ape, though that theory keeps changing/

      • Anonymous

        One thing that doesn’t change is DNA. We can see it, we can slice and dice it, and over 90% of our DNA is identical to that of the Great Apes. How does creationism explain the fact that we know that DNA governs our appearance, our physical traits, and even some of our emotions. If each animal was created individually, why do we share so much of the DNA with all other mammals? I thought mapping genes would send the creationist argument back to the cave it came from, instead we still have people who espouse creationism without explaining DNA. Can you explain DNA similarity to me Brucefl56?

        • Anonymous

          Acoutian, please know that Brucefl56 has no interest in science/dna, etc. He is perfectly content with the knowledge of an Australopithecine – a product of African genesis from which he and the rest of us primates likely evolved from. Can you believe that in this day and age of knowledge that people still believe that something they call god (Santa Claus) merely waved his wand and created all that is in 6 days. WOW. Even todays four-year-olds are not THAT dumb.

          • Anonymous

            I have great admiration for science, but science isn’t always right.  I am sure you two believe taking a baby out of the womb except for the head, and doing what they do is not murder.

        • Anonymous

          With Faith, one does not need to explain.

          •  Hence the expression, “ignorance is bliss”

          • Anonymous

            As I said, I do not have to be intolerable.

        • Anonymous

          Thanks for lobbing that softball straight down the middle, Acountian.   Just as any builder/designer/painter/architect becomes known for a signature style – you can look at the work and say, “That must be a _____” – because of the similarities in the work. 

          Likewise, created beings are bound to have similarities, including DNA.  Why?  Because we all share a common Creator/Designer. 

          You asked bruce to explain DNA, sooooo….while we’re on the topic of DNA, please help me understand, how did the information for DNA get programmed – i.e. how did it evolve?  Human DNA is essentially the programmed code, containing infinitesimally more information than any computer, that makes us who we are in large part. 

          We assume that a computer was programmed by an intelligent being; yet, you assume that the human body and even the simplest single-celled organism, both of which are vastly more complex than a computer, evolved by chance and natural selection.  Is that rational?  Why?

          • Jordan Bryant

            If it is to be stated that anything in existence must be created, then who created the creator? Google “infinite regress.” Your argument is grossly insufficient.

      • Anonymous

        And just exactly who is the “one true god?”

        • I’m going to go with Thor, he seems pretty nice, and he has that cool hammer and all…

          • Anonymous

            LOL

          • Anonymous

            Easy to ridicule ones belief’s isn’t it.

          • Actually Thor is a god, therefore in the running for the “one true god.” Just like Zues, Vishnu, Thor’s father Odin who is actually called “The All Father” so his title alone gives him a leg up on the competition, and there are a ton of other gods to chose from as well. All with the same amount of evidence of their existence as your god.

        • Anonymous

          “I AM, JEHOVAH”

          • I AM IRONMAN

          • Anonymous

            There is no “one true God.” If you can provide physical scientific evidence I will take your sentence seriously. Quoting from an historical fiction book written thousands of years ago is not evidence or proof. 

  • Guest

    My parents decided that I am a Catholic. I’m quite sure that I would not have joined on my own. They do some very good work, but not enough to counter beliefs that are just not mine.

  • waynorth1

    Raised Catholic….though I have close friends that give 10% weekly, I refused after the molestation issue became so rampant.  Trying to be a good person doesn’t need a weekly service to get to heaven.  I’ll figure it out during the conversation in purgatory.  I’m either in or out!  

    • Anonymous

      Suggest you try another denomination.  I know several lapsed Cathoics who have found a new religious home.

      • waynorth1

        Subject: [bdn] Re: Got faith? Maine the least-religious state in the nation

      • waynorth1

        The 17-year-old is drumming to Rush as I type this…..gonna go out and start a fire and think about it. God, I’m turning into a hippie! Nothing wrong with that………. Subject: [bdn] Re: Got faith? Maine the least-religious state in the nation

  • Anonymous

    If the Tea Party and radical politics; either side;  continues to invade the sanctity of the church these numbers will continue to shrink.

    • Guest

      Amen

  • mrspeel2

    ““This information, sadly enough, is no surprise and is disheartening to anyone who is convinced of the importance of authentic and regular religious practice.””

    What’s disheartening is the Catholic Bishops’ vile vitriol against the Girls Scouts of America! What they are trying to do to an organization that has striven to help girls and young women become bright, articulate and compassionate is disgusting. Combine that with the pedophilia that has run rampant within the Catholic Diocese all over the country during the last few decades, it’s no wonder people are losing faith.

    If those actions by religious leaders are what they deem  “authentic and regular religious practice” then I say, by rebuffing religion, Maine is probably a lot smarter than the rest of the country.

    • Anonymous

      The Girl Scouts, like the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (the umbrella org. of american nuns) are both subversive organizations with suspicious motives. A good moral check by the male heirarchy of the Catholic Church can only do them good. I mean, who knows more about nuns and girl scouts than a bunch of 60 year old mostly white males who were never married, never had kids, and let a sex scandal fester for decades. And as the on-going trial in Philadelphia shows, they are still trying to deny the obvious!

      • Anonymous

        LOL

  • Anonymous

    Makes me wonder why it’s so difficult to get Same Sex Marriage passed in this state, since the opposition seems to be so religion-driven.

    • Anonymous

      I think it is because they are the people who vote.

      • Anonymous

        True that.  Maybe this will serve as a bit of a wake-up call for SSM supporters…don’t sit home and hope for the best on election day.

  • Anonymous

    One more GREAT reason to live in Maine!!! Sub-headline could read “Maine the SANEST state in the nation!”  Hooray!!!

    • Guest

      ;;;;

    • You’d think that, but then look at our elected Governor…

  • Another happy Mainer!

  • Anonymous

     Maine the least-religious state in the nation.
     Hooray!

  • Anonymous

     At least marijuana has medical benefits.Jabbering to the nonexistent never did a thing.

    • Anonymous

      Must be a Ron Paul supporter lol

      • Anonymous

        Weak.I despise Paul and do not use marijuana either.Thankfully he quit so we don’t have to listen to his nuts anymore.

  • Guest

    ….

  • Anonymous

    You say there is no God,well I belive in God and ever lasting life. If your right than I’ve lost nothing, but if I’m right you have lost everything.

    •  So what about all those lives that Christians took during periods like the Crusades and Inquisition?

    • Anonymous

      why is that ?

    • Guest

      Thank you

  • It is positive as it shows Maine people are free thinkers, and don’t take to bronze age ideals and indoctrination. I have neither the time nor space here to catch you up completely, so ill just hit the highlights of Christianity being wrong: The Earth is not only round, it is not the center of the universe. The Earth is much, much older than 6,000 years old, and man did not always rule it, there were these things called Dinosaurs. Not every species of animal in the world lived within walking distance of Noah’s house. Human’s weren’t blinked into existence, we are the end result of different species of homo erectus, and neatherthal. P.S. If you still want to believe that Adam and Eve were the first, you might want to think about changing their picture a bit. Genetically speaking, no child can be darker than its darkest parent, thus Adam and/or Eve were black.

    • Anonymous

      Saying religion is indoctrination is a farce. You say free thinkers? If you think you are from a monkey that is our belief

      •  So you deny Christians send young children to Sunday school to take in as truth the unproven theory of your religion?

        • Anonymous

           They’re lucky they escape with their lives.Between the lies,sex abuse and beatings they would’ve been better off under Fagin.

          • Anonymous

            You mean like regular school?

          • Anonymous

            I trust my kids to regular school with no problems.I’d NEVER let the evil ones get their filthy hands near them as has happened worldwide in Catholis schools.

        • Anonymous

          Faith, the substance of things hoped for , the Evidence of things not yet seen.

          •  So… indoctrination, requiring belief where there is not evidence for and plenty of evidence against. Look around you this Sunday, look at the kids. Notice how many of them are only too plainly wearing a look of “I don’t want to be here.” By their parents making them go to church because they believe, they are attempting to indoctrinate their children. Religion gets a pass, when Hitler did the same thing with his Hitler Youth program, their was no question is was indoctrination, and Hitler built that program based on the way Christianity “educated” its youth.

          • Anonymous

            They do not want to be in regular school either do they. Interesting analogy, just let kids do what they want.

          •  Funny thing about school is, Math, Basic Science, U.S. History, and such are all proven real things. Don’t send your child to school, it won’t hurt anyone, but to compare Sunday school to an actual education is asinine.

      • Anonymous

        Nobody accepts the notion that humans evolved from “monkeys”.  So much for your not-so-free indoctrinated thinking.

      • Guest

        ….

      • Anonymous

        No one has ever claimed humans descended from monkeys, except those too ignorant to understand the evidence of evolution and who look for simple answers.

        • Anonymous

          They think they know more than Darwin who spent five years circling the earth taking unbelievable notes and then spending years to analyze the data that he had collected. They would rather believe this made up stories than look at the science. 

        • Anonymous

          ok then apes. Hmm ;yes there were a lot of Ethopian Jewish People :)

          •  How about the fact our immune system comes from Neaderthal? Sorry, we weren’t blinked into existence we are the result of an evolutionary process. Sorry did I offend? Should I have said we weren’t nose wiggled into existence? Well how ever your story book says it happened, be it Jeanie or Bewitched style, it doesn’t hold water.

          • Anonymous

            Why would you offend me, you can say what you please. I just disagree with you. I do not need to be intolerable of you.

    • Anonymous

      I just want to correct you on one point: No child can be darker than the darkest parent. That is bs.

      Jon, African-American, marries blond Swede, Helga. Child looks like Helga. Helga’s child marries Thor, another blond swede. Their child, Ingmar, has dark skin, green eyes. The genetic code hold many secrets still, and a child can be any hue that any of its ancestors had.

      Religion can be a shield or a crutch. Some people use it as a cudgel. If the fundamentalist is Moslem, we call him Taliban. If he is Christian, we give him legitimacy and say he is Evangelical. Both are out to deny women’s rights, both say we can only do what they say is right, both condemn those who don’t believe like them to H3ll. Isn’t it time we call them American Taliban?

      • You are right, I meant parent as in where the gene source comes from. If you think that Adam and Eve were the first people, both, or one of them had to be black. Your example is true too, assuming John didn’t have any darker ancestors though, no descendent of John’s will be darker than John. Unless a descendent has a child with a person who is darker…

        • Anonymous

          All life is derived from populations, not pairs of individuals.  And it’s becoming very obvious that humans originated in Africa and migrated out.  Oh, and the Hebrew meaning of “Adam” is man as in humankind.

        • Anonymous

          did you ever hear of a mutation……a genetic process that produces an offspring with none of the qualities of a parent?

          A black person with blue eyes, totally blows the darkest skin reference you propose.   As brown eyes are dominant, and one parent is black, according to your hypothesis, no blue eyed offspring can occur.  Yet, one in 100,000 black offspring has blue eyes.

          Be careful when you delve into genetics, mother nature doesn’t like you to predispose her will.

      • Anonymous

        Adam, Eve and Jesus were all black.

    • Anonymous

      Only thing wrong with your post is labeling all Christians with these dogmatic, literalist proclamations.  The majority of Christians are not Biblical literalists.

    • Anonymous

      Parents have children believe in Santa clause and the tooth fairy. Yet they think it’s OK to believe a man in the sky is constantly watching. Crazy.

      • Washington County

         No more than believing you evolved from nothing

        • Anonymous

          The explaination that the universe evolved from “nothing” or what physists would refer to as nothing, is a far simpler explaination than the explaination that a supernatural being created it all as a god would be far more complex idea to explain. Plus there is zero evidence that  a god has created anything but mountains of evidence to suggest that all animals evolved and that the earth is approx. 4.5 billion years old. Read the book “Why Evolution is True” by Jerry Coyne for some information on the topic.

          • Washington County

            I believe most of this mountain of evidence for Evolution is speculation at best. Believing in a living GOD is faith of the unseen. One thing Is his protection of county of Jewish nation at such great odds of people who want to destroy her. I will leave you with this.
            If I am right I have heaven to gain, If I am wrong I have nothing to lose. If you are right than you have nothing to gain, but if Your wrong you have everything to lose…. Probably to simple to believe. The progressive can’t stand to believe in a GOD. Why not.

          • Anonymous

             Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company. -Mark Twain
            Same reason why I still live in Maine rather than Florida.  

        • Anonymous

          If you paid attention in science class you would know that nothing is a whole lot of something.  

    • Melora

       Most theologians assume the book of Genesis and the story of creation is just that.. a story to explain in simplified terms, not the actual way it happened.  It makes sense that God would relate such a magnified event into simple terms so even a child would get the meaning behind the story.

      • Anonymous

        Problem is, man does not think as a child. So not so believing.

    • Anonymous

      I agree with you on free thinking in Maine. I am not a sheep I don’t follow religion, but I do worship the earth,she is my religion. There are many Pagans here in Maine. It was the self-proclaimed 
       Christians that drove the Pagans into hiding. The
      Christians were brutal,if you didn’t imbrace their religion, they killed you. They are still the most judgemental people I know.  

      •  At least the Earth is a real living breathing thing. You have more proof for your worship then those that worship the Invisible Sky Wizard.

        • Anonymous

          It’s hard to rag on pagans when they are technically right about the sun being a god.  By definition our sun is a god.  It helped create us with the help of past supernovas, it feeds us, gives us light, and the best thing of all it doesn’t ask us for it’s devotion.  Yet we still fear it the point we cannot look directly at it for it will burn our retinas.  Visible gods > invisible gods.

    • Anonymous

      Curious – how can people be free thinkers if we’re all part of an impersonal evolutionary process?  If “from goo to you” evolution is true, that means our “thoughts” are nothing but random byproducts of chemical reactions within the body, rendering will, emotion and logic meaningless and fleeting illusions. 

      The evolutionary process precludes rational thought. 

      • Anonymous

        I have to confess, that doesn’t make any sense at all. Just because our brains randomly evolved the ability to have rational thought doesn’t mean that rational thought doesn’t exist. It’s a nice theological platitude, but it doesn’t prove anything.

        • Anonymous

          It doesn’t make sense to you because you’ve probably never been challenged to examine the origin of intelligence and reason.  Nothing religious at all about the statements I made; in fact, they are consistent with evolutionary thought. 

          You’re the one making the illogical leap from an impersonal, naturalistic development, void of intelligence to the point where all of a sudden, something/someone on the evolutionary ladder became capable of reason. 

          Tell me, when did this happen?  Which one of the transitional beings developed it?  How did it happen and why?

          Please explain.  Thanks!

          • Anonymous

            I like how you assume to know what I have been challenged to examine, or not examine, as it were. As for your statements, I apologize. I mistook your argument against evolution as one for a religious higher power. My bad! Not sure how I made that mistake…

            In regards to my “leap,” I am not sure where I made one? I never claimed that a light switch was flipped and then all of a sudden a person as we know just started composing poetry or questioning the meaning of life. I think it was you who made that assumption. Fossil records and genetic studies indicate a period of roughly 50 to 80 million years or so where what would become our species gradually changed. The 6000 years or so of recorded history is chump change compared to that. I think the more likely metaphor regarding the development of human intelligence would be a fog slowly lifting . The change happened so gradually that it probably would be impossible to tell.

            But, this is all irrelevant as long as you want to trivialize and simplify the theory of evolution, vs. actually arguing with logic or “facts.” You know, of course, that there is no way to know which transitional being specifically had that first glimmer of rational thought, but it is a nice tactic. If I can’t answer that, then my argument must be false, no? That is, unless you have a time machine handy that can whisk us back a few million years? 

          • Anonymous

            The leap is the leap of faith that all evolutionists must make in order to belive that a purely impersonal, mechanistic process could produce anything or anyone with intelligence, reason, emotion and volition.   Can you tell me how this works? 

            You accuse me of trivializing and simplifying the theory of evolution – it’s interesting that pointing out a glaring inconsistency and painting the picture of a major weakness in the theory in black and white terms is considered negative. 

            Reasonable people might question their faith in which they’ve been indoctrinated.  Are you reasonable?

          • Anonymous

            There you go again, making assumptions about someone you don’t know anything about. I do like how when faced with someone making logical arguments, your response is to impugn their character vs. bringing any real content to the discussion. I think so far you have painted me as indoctrinated, unreasonable, illogical, and someone who has ”
            probably never been challenged to examine the origin of intelligence and reason.”  Did I miss anything?

            As to your argument, I did not realize we were debating reasonable doubt? My questioning, or possible lack thereof, of what I believe to be true has nothing to do with the actual theory of evolution. As for the “glaring inconsistency” and “weakness” you pointed out, those would be your categorizations, not mine. However, I am impressed that you are so curious about the specifics of neuroscience and the development of human intellect. Might I suggest that you further your research here? http://www.amazon.com/The-Dragons-Eden-Speculations-Intelligence/dp/0345346297/ref=pd_sim_sbs_b_1

            Personally, given the mountain of evidence for evolution, I am not going to nitpick the fact that we have not totally figured out the answers to all possible questions in the universe. Given the alternatives, it seems to be the best, most logical answer that we have, even if it contradicts the tenets of most major religions. So…are -you- reasonable?

    • Anonymous

       And it took the church 500 years to apologize for the Earth centric theories.That’s not all the apologizing they need to do by a long shot.

  • Anonymous

    People are beginning to realize that God doesn’t pay the bills!

    • Anonymous

      Whaaaat?  Then why do the right wing evangelical/fundamentals tithe 10%?  You mean He’s not “paying it forward?”  LOL

    • Jake_OO7

      But he does win football games, but only for one team at a time.

  • Anonymous

    Malone said. “In our diocese there are many initiatives, particularly with teens and young adults, designed to help them embrace our faith.”  Say WHAA?  How’s that working for you?

  • Anonymous

    Couldn’t you have found a better picture than Muslims praying. You forget some came through here on 9/11. I am not saying all are bad, just poor taste.

    •  The Muslims would say the same about a picture of the pope, you forget they may be the descended from those who survived the Crusades. Christians and Muslims have a long violent history, and no side is more right than the other. How about a picture of a Protestant? Oh wait that might offend a Catholic who survived the Catholic/Protestant wars in Ireland… When you have as much death on your hands as religion does, no matter what you put for a picture it will offend someone.

      • Anonymous

        I am not the judge, but bowing down to man. They say Allah?, but seems they are more concerned about Mohummed.

        • Someone they can actually prove existed? Maybe they’re slightly more realistic in their beliefs? How sill y for them to focus on the tangibles vs. the improbables of their religion.

          • Anonymous

            They believe Jesus was real.

          • Even I believe that Jesus was likely a real person who tried to do good and had stories told of him. I also believe that his feats were likely greatly exaggerated like so many stories humans tell over and over. But, rise from the dead? Either he was not dead or this didn’t happen. Born of immaculate conception? Uh huh… With just a few pieces of today’s technology in existence and we could put this whole thing to rest. One paternity test and an EKG. I’m sure you could revel me with other stories that JC supposedly did that were not humanly possible, I just don’t have time to read fiction.

          • Anonymous

            You said it “humanly possible”

    • Anonymous

       comments like that, are why people are staying out of churches, and religion in general.

      • Anonymous

        I love muslims as well as others, though there belief’s are wrong. (Yes, that is my opinon) If you believe in God (Christian) & the Bible, staying away is opposite of what It says. The problem is we tend to look at the man, and not God.

        • Honest question and I get that it is your opinion: With absolutely no evidence to support your Christian dogma, how can you say a Muslim’s belief is wrong? They have exactly as much proof as you do that they are right and you are wrong.

          • Anonymous

            Not opinion, it is called “Faith”

          • Anonymous

            I was an adulterer who for some reason (okay I had just drunk a quart of Milwaukee’s Best) asked for a sign from Jesus’ mom when I was living in a hut in Florida. When the image reportedly of the Virgin Mary appeared on the window of a building at the intersection of US 19 and Drew St. in Clearwater (which I had once heard on the radio was one of the deadliest intersections in the nation), I thought the religious  people who came to lay flowers and hold vigils were nut jobs.

            Then someone smashed the windows and I became really angry and wanted to feed whoever it was into a woodchipper, ’cause I felt possesive of it.

            That is, until the religious “nuts” started telling reporters
            that they were praying for whoever did it and when the police found the kid, the church that had bought the building had a representative go to court and ask that the charges be dropped.

            http://www.sptimes.com/2004/03/02/Tampabay/For_Mary_s_faithful__.shtml

  • Anonymous

    There’s a definate absense of Catholic, Episcopal and Lutheran Churches in this state. I noticed when I moved to Maine years ago. Another thing I’ve noticed is the effects it has on ur society. In areas where there’s a stronger Church presence there’s also Church assistances for those in need. Maybe the state would be in better shape financially if the needy had more Church resources to turn to in times of need. I don’t agree with a lot of things dictated from the Vatican, but that’s my choice and I personally turn to God on my own terms. That doesn’t help keep tax rates down though.

    Anyone has the right to not agree with the Vatican. I often do, myself. Realize though the good it is known to do for those in need, and how it helps lessen the burder for those who aren’t in need. There’s no denying that as a fact.

    • Anonymous

      There is a relative lack of mainline protestant Churches in Maine, I’m not so sure about Catholic (although seem to be hard hit, closing a lot of churches).  The spread out population has a lot to do with the low precentiage of denominational membership.

  • Anonymous

    I think being part of Massachusetts really messed Maine up.

    • Anonymous

      According to the State of Maine constitution Massachusettes still owns a large percentage of Maine, it is found in the second half of the constitution which noone ever reads.

      • Anonymous

        Yea, the Liberal Democrats and most of Southern Maine lol

        • Yeah, the people that actually pay to keep Maine running. Without those liberal southern Mainer’s there’d be no Maine. In fact we’d be wise to give anything North of Bangor to Canada and save some money.

          • Anonymous

            We keep trying to give you back to Massachusets, but I guess they do not want you either

  • Anonymous

    Religion is becoming extinct because the Church lives in the dinosaur age.
    Woman are second class citizens.
    Gay people are considered “deficient”.
    Obedience is the rule without question.
    Women are denied their right to decide for their own body about contraception or abortion if needed.

    The Church is a Monarchy, a king who rules and expects obedience from subjects.

    The teachings of Jesus are about compassion and tolerance, and above all Charity which is love.

    Does anyone wonder why people shun organized religion?

    Let us pray to the Lord for illumination.

    • Anonymous

      Your list is not representative of all organized relgion(s).  It is, however, way too prevalent.

  • Anonymous

    Could have fooled me….I live in a town full of Bible thumpers….which I wouldn’t mind if they were all truly as Christian as they proclaim…but they just hide their evil behind their religion….they will all have to answer in the end….”As you sow you shall reap….”

    • Anonymous

       Pray on Sunday,prey on Monday and through the week.

  • Guest

    Most of the atheist I know could probably use a lil religion because they all seem to be lacking the moral fiber that religion instills.

    • Guest

      Very well put

      • Anonymous

        Nope.

    •  you mean moral fiber like ignorance, intolerance, and attempting to dictate to others based on a belief they don’t share? Nah, I think I’ll pass on that religious moral fiber thanks.

      • Guest

        ” ignorance, intolerance, and attempting to dictate to others based on a belief they don’t share” Sounds a lot like the liberal church bashing types that want us “not” to believe in God…

        • Not at all, believe all you want, just do not attempt to deny people things based upon your religious beliefs. Don’t deny those who could live longer, healthier lives because of stem cell research, based on your religious beliefs. Don’t deny a homosexual couple their happiness because your religious beliefs tell you not to let them marry. Keep your religion in the church and out of the lives of those who do not believe as you do. The best part about stem cells research and gay marriage is, if you don’t like it, you do not have to participate in it. It does not harm you in anyway, but can make others happy.

          • Guest

            I dont force anyone to do anything, much like no politician or union official will ever make me join a union, or pay for some corrupt governmental healthcare scam.

            Do what you want, but if government starts to force the church to do abortions in religious hospitals, or force gay weddings in churches, then the phrase devded we fall will come true.

          • Anonymous

            The “religious hospitals” by their very nature are not religious if they accept any patient and hire any medically qualified employee, regardless of religion. If they accept public money in any way, they are obligated to serve the general public. As such, they have no right to deny equal rights to those who do not bow to their religious beliefs. Churches by definition are there to teach and practice their religious beliefs (their primary function), and as such have the right to deny non believers equal treatment if doing so would violate their beliefs. The problem arises when a church affiliated charity, hospital, or other non church institution attempts to force non believers to conform to the church’s practices.

          • Guest

            The Church doesnt, they treat anyone that comes to them, regardless of faith or life style, but they will not perform abortions or conduct gay weddings.

          • Anonymous

            A church is not a hospital. A hospital is not a church. A food pantry is not a church. It is the Catholic church which is attempting to claim a hospital or food pantry is the same as a church.

          • Guest

            Actually there have been hospitals in churches, and churches in hospitals.

            Much like no corrupt politician or union thug can make me pay for insurance or dues, the Catholic Hospitals cannot be forced to performing abortions.
            Catholic charities donate food, clothes and home heating oil to the needy, no matter their religion or who they sleep with.

    • Anonymous

      “It ain’t necessarily so …”  Gershwin.

    • Yeah like molesting alter buys?

  • Tedlick Badkey

    This is one of the reasons I moved and now call Maine home!

    Great news!!!

  • Guest

    I question these statistics, because anyone that has traveled our great country knows that religion is very much alive in many states, especially in Maine.

    While there is a dwindling attendance in a lot of churches, due to a number of reasons, some valid, the core of most churches are just as strong as they ever have been.

    Quite a number of those that profess they attend, that really dont, are referred to by regular church parishioners as Chreesters,,, or the Christmas & Easter flock…

    Try and find the time to view the links below; who knows, they might just inspire someone to return to the church, or find God in his or her own way.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZBTyTWOZCM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3g47w6S_Io

    • Anonymous

      Kind of weird that they make you recite the “Pledge of Allegiance” when you’re a child, huh? Especially when Matthew 5:34 says not to swear any oaths at all. 

      Maybe the reason people aren’t attending church as much is because people grew tired of seeing  Luke 20:46 – 48 come true every day.

      http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/135/reagan.html

  • Anonymous

    Free thinkers and skeptics ought be the great filters of our democracy.  As for the true believers, it seems to me that the greater the fervor, the greater the difficulty in separating the prayers from the preyers. It’s the latter any one ought be watchful for, particularly when promises of redemption and heaven are tied to blind obedience and a sleep of reason.

    • Anonymous

      A realistic religion–and faith– promotes asking questions, probing the mystery.

  • Ben Hutchins

    Does that mean fewer people in Maine are religious, though, or simply that fewer people in Maine believe that their religion-or-lack-thereof is anyone else’s business?  I would tend to suspect that option B is at least as likely as option A for any given person surveyed.  I’m happy to tell anyone who asks that I’m a materialist (in the philosophical sense, not the acquisitional one), but there are plenty of people (religious and otherwise) in my circle who would just as soon tell a pollster to climb a tree as share that kind of personal detail with some random stranger taking a survey.

  • Anonymous

    Bad poll question, I didn’t vote.  What’s the definition of “religious”?  I belong to a mainline Protestant religious demonation, life-long.  If that makes me religious, I guess I check yes.  The question should been along the lines of the main theme:  do you belong to a religious denomination. 

    • Guest

      We didn’t allow Catholics to marry outside the church when I was growing up.. It was a good practice that still is in place today…. Divorce rate is lower amoung 2 people who practiced the same religion prior to marriage…
      P.S. Put the Pope in charge of the war and it will be over by next Tuesday.

      • Breaking News: Divorce is low in the same church that practically allows child rape. I’ve yet to meet a Catholic that actually followed their faith to the letter. Instead they’ve introduced the “free pass system” that allows them to break almost any rule as long as they later admit it and say a few passages! Sanity? I think not. 

      • Jake_OO7

        The Pope is a Nazi, he sure would know how to conduct a proper war.

  • Anonymous

    Relgious reformation did not end in the 16th Century.  It’s a continuing process, or should be.  By reforming themsleves, religious denominations can assist in the increase of religiousity.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t have time to read 151 comments BUT whats up w/ the Muslim  prayer pic? Does BDN think that’s some how correct? Please some one explain…..
    I’m sure this will be flagged.
    Gonzo

    • Anonymous

      The poll was about organized religion, which includes Moslems as well as Christians, Buddhists Hindus, etc.

  • Im getting all the religion I need outdoors up here in Maine,peace&quiet,beautiful,and all this beauty made by God…

  • Guest

    I’ve been to Church (Catholic) for over 50 years.

  • Anonymous

    Same as a pic of some christian praying: what’s up with that?

  • Anonymous

    Hallelujah!!!

  • Anonymous

    All I know is my church still packs them in. And it’s not just the elderly either. 

    • Anonymous

      one half hypocrites and one half  fools.

  • Anonymous

    Religion is for people afraid of going to hell.  Spirituality is for those that have been there.

    • Anonymous

      very good

  • Anonymous

    My mother was Catholic and she married a protestant in 1952.  She was very religious and Catholic pastors treated her like crap because she married outside her ‘faith’.  I spent 8 years in Catholic school, not my fondest memories.  

  • Anonymous
  • Alykins

    “What’s alarming about those numbers is that more than 300 years after
    the country was founded by people seeking religious freedom, the large
    numbers of nonaffiliated folks out here is just the norm,” the Rev.
    Steve Lewis, academic dean of Bangor Theological Seminary, said earlier this month.

    That’s not alarming! That’s a part of religious freedom. I don’t do organized religion, I don’t pray or go to church. I believe in what I believe in, not something someone else made up! And I don’t think there’s anything ‘normal’ about organized religion! 

  • Anonymous

    I have read most of the comments and they are the reason I am not “Religous”. “Religious” meaning I don’t attend church. I was reared by my Mother in the Methodist church. She was Lutheran, but there was no Lutheran church available so she chose the next best thing. All religions profess to follow the “WORD OF (their) GOD.  Actually all religions are based on the writings of MEN. MEN. Not one single religion can truthfully say that GOD gave them the words they profess to live by. The Christian BIBLE was written and edited by MEN, not GOD. Faith in GOD is ok. Faith in your beliefs is good.  However,  please don’t tell me your religion is based on the “WORD OF GOD. It is just not true. 

    • Anonymous

      The Bible claims Divine authorship.  You have authoritative proof to the contrary?  Do share!

      • Anonymous

        The planet Pluto is made of poly carbonates and feta cheese. Can you prove otherwise? No you cant. Isnt it ridiculous to ask you to prove it? Sorta.

        • Anonymous

          Isn’t it ridiculous that you state that Pluto is a planet when scientists have delisted it? 

          Incidentally, Pluto is made up of silicates and ice, according to the National Earth Science Teacher’s Association.

          •  Actually, it is currently listed as  a Dwarf Planet, but they have discovered a 4th moon orbiting Pluto, so there is talk of upgrading it back to a full fledged planet. That is one of the things that makes science better than religion, its ability to test its theories and admit when they are wrong. Unlike religion which adheres to dogma that contains no evidence and when met with proof against, puts their fingers in their ears and say, “LALALALALA I’m not listening!”

          • Anonymous

            Unfortunately, science is not as lily white as you presume.  When evolutionists are confronted by evidence to the contrary (especially evidence indicating an intelligent Creator, they still continue down their merry way much as you described above. 

            To wit, a few years back, I wrote an op-ed regarding the formation of the Himalayas.  Given the evolutionary timeframe when Everest began to form and the current rate of growth, it should be somewhere between 60-90 miles tall.  That’s at a uniform rate of growth – and we all know how evolution and uniformitarian principles walk hand in hand.

            Example 2 – evolutionary zealots just plain make stuff up – give ’em a jaw bone, a humerus and a couple of phylanges and presto, they’ve got a transitional 1/2 ape, 1/2 human in full color in museums and elementary science texts.

            Example 3 – the odds of the big bang occurring in and of itself are so infinitesimally small that they are way, way beyond the realm of probability…and yet, because you and others desperately want to avoid accountability to a Creator, it had to have happened. 

            Shall I continue?  Or do you have your fingers in your ears at this point?

      • And this is proof of why our country is so messed up. Do you believe in Santa too? How about the Easter Bunny? Both are far more a reality that your supposed “God”. With reasoning like yours we’re doomed to live in ignorance for centuries to come. “If you can’t prove my story isn’t true, it is?”  Great logic, we wonder why we are globally falling nearly every measurable manner, except debt. 

        •  They didn’t call the era when Christianity held absolute power the Dark Ages for nothing…

  • Anonymous

    Yay, Maine!!!

  • Anonymous

    Great post.Sometimes it’s almost too easy to disprove these clowns.It’s no challenge.I’m just happy that a couple of the ignorant troublemakers haven’t posted yet(one in particular)

  • jbmaine

    Now that LePage is Governor numbers of those praying will increase: we pray he disappears soon.

  • Anonymous

    Ask Matthew Shepard’s parents about how the church killed their son.Ask the parents and heterosexual loved ones who are proud members of GLAAD.Ask the families of those killed or injured in clinic bombings.I could keep going for a long time.You make it sound like all church members are these wonderful people with glowing halos.It just ain’t true.

    • Anonymous

      Just like the Islamic terrorists that killed 3,000+ people on 9/11, their are extreme members of ALL religions. I choose not to paint ALL members of any religion based on the actions of a few.

      • Anonymous

         That is absolutely true BUT those few,especially if they have plenty of $$ and influence,can do a staggering amount of damage.

        • Anonymous

          Looking throughout history more people have been killed in the name of the “one true religion” then any serious of wars.

          The Catholic Church practiced genocide against whole groups of people. Even descendents of the Pilgrims practiced genocide against the natives.

          • Anonymous

            I wish that wasn’t true but it is in spades.The CC is responsible for damage beyond calculation.

  • Anonymous

     One of the critically underreported stories is that many military atheists or believers in the less represented religions are getting right wing crap shoved down their throats when they don’t have access to other religious choices(or to none)There are stories of military women not receiving proper reproductive care due to a bluenose that got away with it.

  • Rev. Steve Lewis, this country was not founded on religious freedom.  It was founded on taxation without representation.  Our fore fathers revolted and won a war that gave us our freedom.  Religious freedom is an end result. The pilgrams left England to avoid the Anglican Church and the King.  Any person with an eighth grade education should know this.   It has taken years for catholics and muslums to be accepted in this country.  As always its about the money.  I consider my self a religious person if you ask.

  • The flying spaghetti monster made us and will make everything okay when we die…sounds like a reason to accept the lousy fate the elites gave us…the opiate.

  • Anonymous

    Crimes of violence every day everywhere; bullying, girl gangs, oxycontin epidemics….almost unheard of when I first moved to Maine 25 years ago when people were of faith.

    Liberal democrats got their way and weakened the church, even legalized witchcraft, i.e. WICCAN….you reap what you sow! 

    • Anonymous

       That’s a cute, overly-simplistic, completely false explanation for why we are where we are at now–kind of like religion!

      • Right on point.  Organized religion is nearly at the root of every war.

    • Anonymous

       Crimes of violence? Bullying? Have you read the bible? These things aren’t caused by a lack of faith. Look around with open eyes. People who are not “of faith” are moral too.

    • Anonymous

      I know witchcraft was illegal in Salem in 1690’s but when was it “legalized” in modern society?

    • Guest

      The Catholic church along with millions of Christians from various denominations are no match for the money, power, and influence Wiccans have in our government. Blame whoever thought up that ‘freedom of religion’ silliness. Who was it again? And which party screams most loudly in support of it now? As Pat ‘Haitian voodoo causes earthquakes’ Robertson says, ‘reap what you sow.’

    • Anonymous

      I particularly like when the finger pointing is done to someone outside of the group. I was once a church goer – we stopped going when our preacher passed away in a car accident. The church record keeper was given the position – despite not having ever gone to seminary school. He used every Sunday to preach about his hate for this group of people or that group of people – not the Bible. We stopped going and I have not returned to church. I don’t need to expose myself and my family to hate. There is plenty of it in the world and true Christians shouldn’t HATE anyone or anything. So, if you want to point fingers, point it at the “Christians” walking among us spewing hate, the “Christians” that have turned churches into business, and the “Christians” that wouldn’t give a nickel to a homeless person even if they had a million dollars.  
      It is just like people are always saying about the US. We help everyone else, but don’t take care of our own problems. Well, until religion gets their house in order, they should probably stop condemning other people. They can’t help anyone until they help themselves.

    • Anonymous

      The fact that you mention Wicca as something bad only shows you have absolutely no idea of which you speak.

  • sassyfrazz

    “Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.”
    Marcus Aurelius

  • Anonymous

    I dunno.  There are a LOT of community groups and community activities that have dried up and gone away over the years from the Grange to community suppers, and on and on.

    I’m not convinced that churches are dying in Maine simply because people here are moving away from religion so much as it’s people moving away from nearly all community-based affiliations and activities.

  • Anonymous

    Wow, I find this shocking. Almost everyone I know from here is an anti-government, pro-gun, Republican Christian. Except me.

  • Anonymous

    I pray every day, first for myself then for members of my family. Then I pray that after my taxes, insurance, utilites, car payment, gas prices, food and inflation I will have enough…just a little to enjoy the Spring, Summer and Fall. I know for a fact that I cannot afford Winter!

  • Anonymous

    This is what we’ve brought here;
    The Quran:
    Quran(2:191-193) – “And slay them wherever ye find them, and drive them out of the places whence they drove you out, for persecution [of Muslims] is worse than slaughter [of non-believers]… but if they desist, then lo! Allah is forgiving and merciful.   And fight them until persecution is no more, and religion is for Allah.”  
    Quran(2:216) – “Fighting is prescribed for you, and ye dislike it. But it is possible that ye dislike a thing which is good for you, and that ye love a thing which is bad for you. But Allah knoweth, and ye know not.”   
    Quran(3:56) – “As to those who reject faith, I will punish them with terrible agony in this world and in the Hereafter, nor will they have anyone to help.” 
    Quran(3:151) – “Soon shall We cast terror into the hearts of the Unbelievers, for that they joined companions with Allah, for which He had sent no authority”. 
    Quran(4:76) – “Those who believe fight in the cause of Allah…” 
    Quran(4:89) – “They but wish that ye should reject Faith, as they do, and thus be on the same footing (as they): But take not friends from their ranks until they flee in the way of Allah (From what is forbidden). But if they turn renegades, seize them and slay them wherever ye find them; and (in any case) take no friends or helpers from their ranks.” 
    Quran(4:95) – “Not equal are those believers who sit (at home) and receive no hurt, and those who strive and fight in the cause of Allah with their goods and their persons. Allah hath granted a grade higher to those who strive and fight with their goods and persons than to those who sit (at home). Unto all (in Faith) Hath Allah promised good: But those who strive and fight Hath He distinguished above those who sit (at home) by a special reward,-”  
    Quran(5:33) – “The punishment of those who wage war against Allah and His messenger and strive to make mischief in the land is only this, that they should be murdered or crucified or their hands and their feet shouldbe cut off on opposite sides or they should be imprisoned; this shall be as a disgrace for them in this world, and in the hereafter they shall have a
    grievous chastisement” 
    Quran(8:12) – “I will cast terror into the hearts of those who disbelieve. Therefore strike off their heads and strike off every fingertip of them”  
    Quran (8:39) – “And fight with them until there is no more fitna (disorder, unbelief) and religion should be only for Allah” 
    Quran(9:14) – “Fight them, Allah will punish them by your hands and bring them to disgrace…” 
    Quran(17:16) – “And when We wish to destroy a town, We send Our commandment to the people of it who lead easy lives, but they transgress therein; thus the word proves true against it, so We destroy it with utter destruction.”

    • Guest

      Oh goodness, the Christian fundies have a fit when people post all the awful violent/incestuous/slavery-condoning/bestial crud that’s in the Bible. I hope they’re consistent and condemn what you’ve just done. Unless you’re one of them?

      • Anonymous

        One of them? Not likely. I have no religion. Why not show just a few verses of the Quran? There are hundreds more like this and many are worse. Of course, this probably shouldn’t concern anyone.

        • Anonymous

           Celer there are equally “bad” parts of the Bible too.

          • Anonymous

            I expected better from you jd2008jd. The obvious difference is that in this country we no longer crucify people or chop off heads and hands. We don’t teach “kill the infidels”. The Bible, for what it’s worth, is ancient history from a brutal time. This religion is still stoning people today. It’s still throwing acid in the faces of women. What you need, is to have visited Iraq as an example.
            Much of the palaces have been left in tact so that people can see what went on. Drained swimming pools stained with gallons of blood from executions. The man made lakes in the desert at Hussein’s sons palaces, with elaborate house boats on them, because Allah can’t see what goes on the water. That is where they would bring the 12-14 year old girls to rape, and then kill them, because then they are tainted and their parents would not want them back anyway.
            If you believe, as Obama has recently stated, that the war on terror is over, then you would be much more naive then your previous posts have led me to believe.      

          • Anonymous

            Odd would you say that there are some sects of Christian religion that still follow many of the laws found in the Bible that others do not?

             Isn’t it odd that it is OK to murder a healthcare provider that performs abortions?

            Isn’t it odd that the Christian right that wants to stop abortions also condones state sanction murder in the form of the death penalty?

            Isn’t it odd that the Christian religion that preaches peace, tolerance and understanding about others also in many case are the same ones that condemn people that are different from them?

            Isn’t it odd that the Bible was used to uphold racial segregation, slavery and prevent interracial marriages in this country?

            Isn’t it odd that the Westboro Baptist church (a self proclaimed Christian church) makes there way across the country and celebrates the death of our military members, Elizabeth Edwards (what did she do that was wrong Celer?), etc…?

            Isn’t it odd that the Bible and various churches and denominations used the Bible to practice and justify genocide of whole races of people?

            Celer before you start pointing fingers at other groups, people, religions, etc…remember to look in the mirror and see who your three other fingers are pointing at.

            And while President Obama may have said that the War of Terror was over, it was President Bush that said we were not at war with the Islamic religion. We never have been at war with Islam, we have been at war and continue to be at war with a group of fundamental religious zealots and when you paint the religion with one brush you just gave those fundamental religious zealots more ammunition to use against us…GOOD JOB Celer!

        • Guest

          It’s fine to point it out as long as you point out the more immediate threat of Christianity too. How genuinely concerned can one be to point fingers at a mouse while the lion roars in the background?

    • Guest

      ====

      • Guest

        Good choices!  My personal favorite…

        Ezekiel 23:19,20:  “Yet she became more and more promiscuous as she recalled the days of her youth, when she was a prostitute in Egypt. There she lusted after her lovers, whose genitals were like those of donkeys and whose emission was like that of horses.”

        …and yet Godly parents find it difficult to explain to their kids in a nonsexual manner that sometimes two men hold each others hands and fall in love. How in the red hot heck do these same folks explain the blatantly sexual material they’ve foisted upon their children?

      • Anonymous

        A brutal time in history for sure, if any of it is true. The difference is the verses from the Quran are still practiced today. I posted some rather tame verses to keep from being flagged.
        Maybe I’ve missed it in the news, but I haven’t seen any stories of Christians stoning people, chopping off heads or limbs, or their favorite “crucifying” anyone lately.

  • Yes, I am religious but I am decidedly NOT Christian. I do not belong to a church or nother organized religious group.  When thinking about faith issues, folks need to be aware that there is life out there outside of (a) buildings and (b) the Judeo-Christian paradigm.

  • Anonymous

    Alarming? Hardly. It is why I am proud to live here. There may or may not be a god(s), but we have made ours in our image. Mainers should be proud to avoid bowing down. And what in the world does belonging to a specific denomination have to do with being spiritual? Seems to me nationwide there are a lot more of these zealots who are trying to tell us how to run our lives than they used to be. The Catholic church gets more right wing and anachronistic every day. Women are treated ptifully and not as equals. But as for us, as in politics, Mainers are an independent lot, and I for one salute that. 

  • Talking clouds , nectar and virgins, milk and honey, loaves and fishes , walking on water
    pearly gates , golden arches……
    Sounds kind of nice.
    Is there a catch?
    God is coming , look busy.

  • Anonymous

    The wise man sits outside the church on Sunday to get a good look at who will try to screw him on Monday.

  • Sectar114

    Finally!!! …a poll that we do good in.

  • BJ Kitchin

    Lets see what the “creeper/comments” section of the BDN has to say about this article.  Should be uplifting. >.<

  • Anonymous

    If “organized religion” didn’t concentrate so much on gathering wealth and power, more people might find it admirable.  Feed the poor, care for the sick, preach loving thy neighbor as thyself . . . Jesus said a lot about those things.  He didn’t say anything about homosexuals or birth control or building huge temples.

  • Jake_OO7

    Imagine there’s no heaven
    It’s easy if you try
    No hell below us
    Above us only sky
    Imagine all the people
    Living for today… 

    Nothing to kill or die for
    And we are “Open for Business” too…

    • Anonymous

      I bet the author of those words could have made it big in the music business!

  • Eric Jackson

    The great part of being born in a country that values religious freedom is that we are afforded the opportunity to be free from religion.  It may be alarming to the Rev. but it is comforting to me. 

  • Guest

    So vastly tired of tabloid-style headlines.  Not having a religious affiliation has nothing to do with being either “religious”, nor whether or not individuals  have deep abiding faith.

    The excuse for this type of headline is usually that it has to be kept short.  Of course it has to attract attention.  To be tantalizing, the headline could easily have read:  “Flocks leaving traditional churches in droves.”

    • Anonymous

      Or, Catholic church loosing priests due to the shortage of alter boys

  • Anonymous

    There is no evidence for a god. It’s comforting for people to believe in a supernatural father who is watching over us and protecting us. But just because we would like to believe that, doesn’t mean that it’s true. Furthermore, people, the majority of the time, belong to thte religion their family and society they grew up in belong to. So peoples religious faith really has nothing more to do with “truth” than geography. I have no problem with people practicing their religion as they see fit, but when they attempt to govern others based on their own religious beliefs, attempt to hinder scientific progress, or try to get creation myths taught in school as a valid alternative to evolution, then I have an issue. Open your minds and educate yourselves people!

    • Anonymous

      sooo what you are saying is evolution is true because some bunch of scientists agree it is true, right?  What about the HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS of christians who say that God created it all? Hmmmm… now, who is the close minded one trying to teach myths?

      • Really? That’s your, logic? Is Santa Claus real, because at some point or another millions of children believe he is, who’s to say they’re wrong?

      • Guest

        The majority of the world believes in Allah. Must mean he’s real. Sorry about you and your god, better luck next time.

  • “In Maine, 10,684 Mormons were reported in the 2010 report, an increase of 3,565 members over 1990. Eight of every 1,000 people in Maine were Mormons in 2009. That makes the denomination one of the fastest growing in the state.”

    Does this have anything to do with Mormon church’s machinations to turn over the “gay marriage” law in Maine. They moved lots of people and money to CA to change things there. I find it an easy leap to them having done the same thing in Maine.

    In which case this would make them a political organization and they should be taxed accordingly.

  • Anonymous

    Three cheers for Maine!

  • Anonymous

    This country was founded on Christian beliefs and values. Until people started acting like heathens in the 60’s and 70’s this country was doing very good, crime was low, child abuse was low, school drop put rate was low, divorce was low, people actually grew up with morals and standards that are missing today. Children were raised by their parents not some TV show or babysitter or some government officials. There is not one single predominatly Christain nation where people starve to death. Not one. Not here not anywhere Christian because God takes care of his own. We as a nation have lost our moral standards and moved into near Satanistic values. All beleifs based on self gratification, self-centeredism and not caring about each other. The Bible teaches us to “love one another” not treat each other like life is some kind of race and you have to kill each other to win. If we don’t fix this then this country is doomed. Tell me God doesn’t exist when you are in Hell saying “It’s not hot, I’m not here, It’s not hot, I’m not here.”

    • No one starves in the US? Is this the only proof we need to show you there is no god? You say the bible teaches to love one another, but clearly not love every one, right? Maybe your version doesn’t call for demonizing non-believers or homosexuals, but many do. One must ponder why your god allowed the US to fall so far, if he’s the one who really takes care of you. 

  • Anonymous

    I find that people without religious belief tend to be less judgmental and more likely to MYOB.  We understand that doing good works have an immediate effect, that of helping our fellow man.  We do not have a need to do good out of fear of some fictitious eternal punishment nor in order to rack up points toward a heaven.  We do it because it’s the right thing to do.

  • ” less than 30 percent of the population belong to a religious denomination or independent Christian church” Right. What this article isn’t understanding is that Maine has a very large Pagan community. We might not be majority Catholic or Christian, but it does NOT mean we are without religion whatsoever. I’d be happy if they did a more thorough and open-ended study before announcing this.

  • What kills me is that so many Christians scoff at Scientology and/or the Mormon’s citing their recently made up religions, which seem to be taken up en masses, but don’t realize that the Bible has a similar beginning? These “new” religions merely prove that you can make stuff up and get great numbers to believe. It’s maddening to argue with people that so wholeheartedly accept things that cannot be remotely proven.

    So for you Christians I ask: Why is God killing children? Why does child abuse exist?  Did the Creator decide to retire and just watch? Yeah, yeah, just testing faith right? What a sick thought.

  • Anonymous

    Hmmmm – Democratic state, least religious.  Could there be a connection???

  • Anonymous

    The Headline should be…. Maine, Most logical State in the nation

  • RoostookGuy

    People in Maine aren’t any less religious; the churches in Maine have failed to interest people that see most organized religion for what it is.

    BS.

  • Anonymous

    The headline should say…..Maine, most logical State in the nation.

  • Anonymous

    I think that after 300 years of religious freedom Maine is the state that truly speaks to freedom!

  • Old Bear

    Just because people do not go to church does not mean they are not religious. They have a church services everyday on TV..

  • Anonymous

    Declining religiosity and closing churches! Excellent news!  The human race needs to get past superstitions and fairy tales like Christianity, Islam, etc…

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