Comments for: What’s behind Maine’s business boomlet?

Posted May 11, 2012, at 5:45 p.m.

PORTLAND | A surge of viable economic activity in Maine may help push the state’s business climate in a more positive direction. Although some business analysts say this mirrors the national trend, others are more cautious. Deals of late that have caught notice involve millions of dollars and the …

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  • Anonymous

    Let’s give credit where it is due – Gov. LePage’s attempts to make Maine more business friendly seem to be paying off.

    • Anonymous

      More like LePage’s attmepts to take credit for developments not his.

  • Anonymous

    Oh gee no Penguin remarks from the libs

    • Anonymous

      Your one-liners are neither original nor erudite. Why don’t you attempt to give a thoughtful response to my remarks.  

      Quoting the first two paragraphs:
       
      “A surge of viable economic activity in Maine may help push the state’s business climate in a more positive direction.

      Although some business analysts say this mirrors the national trend, others are more cautious. Deals of late that have caught notice involve millions of dollars and the potential for expanding jobs.”
       
      In a thorough review of the article there is nothing in it that even remotely should be interpreted to give credit to Maine’s governmental policies. In fact, among many possible factors that were noted, more than once a national trend was cited. There is a great deal of speculation as to the stimuli for this business activity, but nothing definitive is identified, nor any reference or implication that Gov. LePage deserves any commendation. 
       
      Additionally, these are acquisitions and mergers of existing Maine businesses, not new enterprises that would definitively add jobs, increase the tax base, and create spin-off economic benefits. While there is hope that expansion may occur from acquisitions and mergers, the reverse is also a potential risk – consolidation of resources and downsizing. 
       
      Certainly, you and I are in agreement that economic growth is the desired result. However, the credit that you give to Gov. LePage is not merited.

    • Anonymous

      Oh even better a lib who thinks he/she is the smartest person in the room. On a serious note Your side will never give credit to Lepage for trying to get this state moving in the right direction

      • Anonymous

        I will give credit and respect when it is due, including to people with whom I disagree. Paul LePage has earned neither. 

        Your comment, “Oh even better a lib who thinks he/she is the smartest person in the room. “, is another example of an irrelevant response to my post. 

        I invited you to make your case for your perspective. So far, all you have done is use the term “lib” with typical sarcasm and insert I.Q.s into the equation. Skip the platitudes.

        You either have something of merit to say or you don’t. It’s that simple. The only thing that you have proven so far is that you have nothing to back up your position. Making inane comments and attempting to divert the topic are classic tactics of someone who can’t support their viewpoint.

        Re-read the article and my original post. If you can give specific examples of my review that conflict with, or misrepresent the story, do so. If you disagree, justify yourself logically. In short, fish or cut bait.

  • Anonymous

    Quoting the first two paragraphs:
     
    “A surge of viable economic activity in Maine may help push the state’s business climate in a more positive direction.

    Although some business analysts say this mirrors the national trend, others are more cautious. Deals of late that have caught notice involve millions of dollars and the potential for expanding jobs.”
     
    In a thorough review of the article there is nothing in it that even remotely should be interpreted to give credit to Maine’s governmental policies. In fact, among many possible factors that were noted, more than once a national trend was cited. There is a great deal of speculation as to the stimuli for this business activity, but nothing definitive is identified, nor any reference or implication that Gov. LePage deserves any commendation. 
     
    Additionally, these are acquisitions and mergers of existing Maine businesses, not new enterprises that would definitively add jobs, increase the tax base, and create spin-off economic benefits. While there is hope that expansion may occur from acquisitions and mergers, the reverse is also a potential risk – consolidation of resources and downsizing. 
     
    Certainly, you and I are in agreement that economic growth is the desired result. However, the credit that you give to Gov. LePage is not merited.

  • Anonymous

         The common denominator here for all of the businesses is that they’ve got the money! More game playing among the elites! They gots and we don’ts!

  • Anonymous

    What is this website? The explanations of doing business with them is terrible.

  • Anonymous

    This is actually bad news for Maine. These large companies are only buying the name and the customer base. They’ll probably close the physical locations to create “efficiency.”

  • Anonymous

    I was hoping this article, based upon the headline’ was going to discuss entrepreneurship.  Acquisitions, with ownership leaving the state.  How is that good for Maine?

  • Anonymous

    As for Downeast Energy it’s unlikely they can move facilities out of state so I am not sure there will be any significant facility changes..  The oil business has been a declining business in Maine and will continue to decline in the future.  I imagine they have other things in mind such as expansion of propane or natural gas in this state.  That sounds good to me. They may plan on     gasoline distribution as well.  A stronger more diversified company may be beneficial.
    Camden National buying branches from a not very popular out of state bank is probably a big positive. 
    I don’t have a clue about the booze business or this particular deal so it may be good or maybe not.  Any time a Mainer can acquire $605 million dollars without big government subsidies my inclination is to cheer.  There is a good chance some of that will be invested in Maine so at least at this point I don’t see a down side.
    Three companies have decided to invest in Maine businesses.  There is no evidence that I know of that would indicate that a more business friendly state government wasn’t a factor

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