October 21, 2017
High School Sports Latest News | Poll Questions | Haunted Maine | Bangor City Council | Orion Krause

Comments for: Sanford votes to drop ‘Redskins’ as high school team nickname

Guidelines for posting on bangordailynews.com

The Bangor Daily News and the Bangor Publishing Co. encourage comments about stories, but you must follow our terms of service.

  1. Keep it civil and stay on topic
  2. No vulgarity, racial slurs, name-calling or personal attacks.
  3. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked.
The primary rule here is pretty simple: Treat others with the same respect you'd want for yourself. Here are some guidelines (see more):

  • Anonymous

    Charmins win again…

  • Anonymous

    This is sad what is happening to our Country. No need to change the name!!

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, so sad when citizens want to put away terms equated with death and blood. Sad that we as a society are becoming more and more respectful of other cultures and races. It was better when whites were in charge and minorities had no say and knew their place.

      • Anonymous

        “Redskins” had nothing to do with scalping. Unless, of course, you equate American Indians with “death and blood,” for some reason.

        • Anonymous

          There are several definitions listed for Redskins. The one that sticks with most Natives is that there was a bounty for Passamaquoddy and Penobscot bloody scalps. It is often equated to blood. It is not a term of endearment but is derogatory. 

          Indian headresses have been worn in the past by team mascots, our sacred drums mocked by school bands, faces of cartoon Natives on sweatshirts, etc. Why not just change it to the Sanford Whiteskins? Makes more sense.

          • Anonymous

            See http://anthropology.si.edu/goddard/redskin.pdf

            It’s not any more mocking than a cartoonish viking or minuteman, or Irish man.

          • Anonymous

            Sorry, but the majority of Natives in Maine find the word absolutely offensive and many associate it with the bounty that was on Passamaquoddy and Penobscot heads. You can quote writing all you want, the people alive in this present day do not find the term positive but view it as a racial slur.

            Native Spirituality is tied into the dancing, singing and traditional clothing. To replicate any of these things at a high school basketball game is blasphemous. It would be no different calling the team the Sanford N*ggers or the Sanford Chinks or the Sanford Honkies.

    • Anonymous

      You really think it is sad that something used as a derogatory, racist putdown – which has its root in a bounty paid for random, race-based killings – you really think it is sad that a government entity (school) is no longer using this term?  Really?

      • Anonymous

        Scalping and bounties had nothing at all to do with “redskin.” It was a term the American Indians called themselves. It became the nickname for the Boston Redskins in honor of their American Indian coach, who had no problem with it.

        Are we now going to consider “Minutemen” racist and derogatory? “Celtics”? “Rangers”? “Padres”? “Yankees”?

        • Anonymous

          There are several definitions listed for Redskins. The one that sticks with most Natives is that there was a bounty for Passamaquoddy and Penobscot bloody scalps. It is often equated to blood. It is not a term of endearment but is derogatory. 

          • Anonymous

            And they would be wrong to think that. See http://anthropology.si.edu/goddard/redskin.pdf

          • Anonymous

            Sorry, but the majority of Natives in Maine find the word absolutely offensive and many associate it with the bounty that was on Passamaquoddy and Penobscot heads. You can quote writing all you want, the people alive in this present day do not find the term positive but view it as a racial slur.

            Native Spirituality is tied into the dancing, singing and traditional clothing. To replicate any of these things at a high school basketball game is blasphemous.

            It would be no different calling the team the Sanford N*ggers or the Sanford Chinks, Sanford Holy Rollers or the Sanford Honkies.

          • Anonymous

            It is completely irrelevant that you or other American Indians “associate” the term with bounties. The reality is the term had (and has) nothing to do with a bounty of any kind. The term came from American Indians themselves and was not derogatory.

          • Anonymous

            Read your link again. It is written by a non Native and nearly everyone quoted in this piece is white. It claims that Natives called themselves red man and used the term white man, but they themselves did not start calling themselves redskin, but in fact all of the quotes in the article are from whites with the exception of a couple of speeches by chiefs that were translated by whites.

            The quotes referring to redskins by the whites in this article were not kind words but derogatory. The quotes in the article are degrading when referring to the “red skinned” natives, it is not and never was a term of endearment, but a racist term.

            The tribes listed in the article does not include the Maine tribes, but it mentions Natives from several other areas. The reality is that in Maine there was a bounty on Passamaquoddy and Penobscot heads. This included women and children.

            Redskin is a racial slur. It is no different than the word n*gger, and I can guarantee that not many would support a school calling themselves the Sanford N*ggers.

          • Anonymous

            So because a white man wrote the paper, the paper cannot possibly be accurate?

            There is no evidence, other than the conjecture surrounding the origin of “redskin,” that “redskin” had anything to do with scalping, either by whites or American Indians. The conjecture is just that — a layman’s attempt to provide a simple explanation for the term without actually looking at the facts.

            The facts reveal a complex history for the term, both in origin and in use — neither of which came from a derogatory intent, or even acceptance when the term was first used.

  • Anonymous

    Fail.

    • Anonymous

      Pass!!!

  • Anonymous

    Why don’t we just “do away” with mascots all together so no one is offended?

    • pbmann

      Mascots don’t offend, certain names and stereotypes do.

  • Anonymous

    Soon, there will be no recognition of any American Indian heritage because it might hurt a couple of people who believe that “names” ridicule a nation.  I wish French Canadians would pick up the beat and encourage use of names like “Canuck”, etc.  I would be an honor!  This name thing over the past years is becoming crazy.

    • Anonymous

      It all depends on how grown-up one chooses to be, I suppose. Mascots are nothing more than manifestations of petty tribalism.

      • Guest

        You took the words right out of my mouth, especailly the petty tribalism part.

      • Anonymous

        It’s organized sports.  Is there something more tribal?

        • RoostookGuy

          Or more petty ?

    • Anonymous

      If it’s good for one name why not all?
      Let’s re-name Passadumkeag, Mattamiscontis, Mattawamkeag, and any other name that we continued to use. That will avoid any future problems.
      Why is there no problem with Orono? It’s named after Chief Joseph Orono.

      • pbmann

        Those names respect the culture and history of the region, calling your team the “Redskins” does neither.

        • Anonymous

          You might want to look into how the Washington Redskins came to be. You will be surprised.

          • pbmann

            The Redskins started in Boston as the Braves in the 1930s. After the Boston Braves baseball team moved away from Boston, the football Braves decided to change their name. They wanted to keep a similar name. So they looked at the remaining baseball team in town (Boston Red Sox) and thought about incorporating part of the Red Sox name into the new name for the football team. And keeping the Indian theme, the football team changed their name to the Redskins.

            http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_did_the_Washington_Redskins_get_their_name

            As for how the term “redskin” came about their are several different theories.  One of theose theories was it was a name given to the scalp of an Native American for the bounty. Forty pounds for a male scalp, twenty pounds for a female scalp or a male under 12.

            http://www.aics.org/mascot/redskins.html

      • Anonymous

        Good examples of how names can be respectful. Using a name associated with bloody scalps or racist slurs are not respectful. 

        Would you be OK if Christianity was at the center of this debate? If Christ was the team mascot and someone dress up like him or a priest and come out onto the floor? And if the team was called the “Christers or the Evangelicals? 

        • Anonymous

          I would be perfectly fine with that.
          They can also have nuns for cheerleaders for all I care.

          • Anonymous

            Yes, but what would the Christians say? They wouldn’t stand for it.

          • Anonymous

            “Monks,” “Friars,” and “Padres” don’t seem to draw much criticism.

          • Anonymous

            TrueNative, how do you think that these children originally come up with what they want to call their sports teams? Do you think that they try to come up with something weak like a mouse or a rabbit? Of course not. They choose something that they feel is strong and that they respect, to call themselves. The idea that the Indians are offended would make one think that the children decided that they would call themselves losers and weak, instead of something that they respect.
            I think that this shows that the intent was not derogatory, but respect. Considering today’s Indians, it is probably a very good idea to change the name anyway.

          • Anonymous

            When we know better we should do better. The children who supposedly named the team didn’t know any better back then. Racial slurs and name calling was common practice. White was the dominate race back then and minorities had little say. Times have changed.

            Children may have named the team but they have spoken once again and have said that it is a racial slur and should not be used. They would more than likely feel proud that Maine Natives are speaking up against an offensive term and offensive mockery at sporting events. 

            The majority of Natives in Maine find the word absolutely offensive and many associate it with the bounty that was on Passamaquoddy and Penobscot heads. The Native people alive in this present day do not find the term positive but view it as a racial slur.

            Native Spirituality is tied into the dancing, singing and traditional clothing. To replicate any of these things at a high school basketball game is blasphemous.

            It would be no different calling the team the Sanford N*ggers or the Sanford Chinks, Sanford Holy Rollers or the Sanford Honkies.

    • Anonymous

      It’s called being respectful and acknowledging that some of the things in the past that have been said and done should still not be embraced today. Listening to what an oppressed group has to say about the genocide that nearly wiped out an entire race of people on this continent is an honorable thing. 

      No team would be allowed to be called the Sanford N*ggers. Redskins is no different than that word. When we know better, we should do better. 

  • Anonymous

    This again.. Its just a  nickname for a high school mascot.  I live in and area where the mascot names are OWLS, BEAVERS, HORNETS, PIONEERS, BEARS, VIKINGS, ETC.. Are they all supposed to be offended because a school used them as a mascot name? Come on People.

    • Anonymous

      I highly doubt any Vespidae would call issue with the name. They don’t talk much. However, Native Americans call issue with the name ‘redskins’ because it has it’s roots in 18th century manifest destiny era of racism. An era which saw their ancestors driven from their lands. Their way of life was taken from them through blind hatred and a lack of understanding from the USA citizenry. 

    • Anonymous

      Four of the six names you have used are animals. Why is a race of people used as a mascot when the majority of teams have animals as mascots? 

      Reminds me of “animal” crackers back in the sixties. Animal crackers had all animals with the exception of the Indian heads that were included in the box, equating Native Americans as being animals.

  • Superuser23

    New Headline: “Sanford board votes to drop Redskins name, voting for change to Chickens next week”

    • Anonymous

      It takes great strength to speak up against those who want to continue to embrace racist terms. I’d say they are courageous and certainly not chickens. 

      • Superuser23

        I am pretty sure the name had no intention of any racist meanings, but because they don’t have the strength to speak up about their feelings after many years, maybe it is not chickens but perhaps cowards. This is what’s wrong with the country, standing up and speaking for and defending your harmless actions

  • Anonymous

    Until Indian Island changes their name, Old Town High should still be the Indians.

  • Rgiff

    Custers last words were “I dont know what got into those Indians, but they were alright at the dance last nite.”

  • Anonymous

    call um white skins,we can take a little name calling and not cry about it.

    • RoostookGuy

      How about behaving like adults and not calling each other any names for a change ?

    • Anonymous

      Great idea. Why not call them the Sanford Whiteskins? Or the Sanford Blackskins or Sanford Yellowskins.

  • Guest

    High School kids are so into computer  tech today; let’s use names such as  , the servers,the  i Pads, the  hompagers,the  routers,the  mobile devicers, the  texters, etc. The names are endless and the names should offend no one outside of silicon valley.

  • My problem with this isn’t that the names are being changed, it’s the idea that people think that by changing these names, all the racism and prejudices will just disappear. They won’t. There will always be people that are racist and prejudiced no matter what your school mascot is. Why don’t we just rip up the majority of our textbooks too so our kids will have even less of an idea that these things happened and soon we can officially change the name of Thanksgiving Day to Turkey-Football Day.

    As far as the flipside goes, again, do not have a problem with the name being changed. It’s just being done in reverse. Dan Snyder (owner of the NFL’s Washington Redskins) should have been the first person to do this, and instead it’s the exact opposite. The Redskins should have changed their names and THEN everyone down the chain follows suit. So the most recognizable organization using a defamatory name doesn’t change their name but a couple high schools in Maine do and that’s a win? Please. Not even a blip on the radar screen.

    No matter what you call your team or your school, there will always be racists and prejudiced people. If those wanting these changes so desperately wish they be changed, start at the root of the problem, not the vines and branches.

You may also like