October 19, 2017
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Comments for: Hancock County animal shelter rescues puppies from Guam

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  • Anonymous

    We are importing from Guam ?? The math doesn’t work. The $500 plus adoption fee would cover the adoption fees of at least two dogs already in Maine shelters.  Does this make an impact on the over population on Guam?  No.  Poor use of limited resources. 

    • Anonymous

      With any luck the next time this shelter is doing a fundraiser and crying hard times, the locals will remember this story and how their money is being spent.

  • As a former animal rescuer I’m disgusted at what you are doing! How
    do you justify taking in animals from another country when right here in Maine
    we or so over populated with puppies, kittens, dogs , cats and an assortment of
    other small animals. Last month the Bangor daily had an article on the Bangor
    animal shelter having a special day to get rid of the over population of animals
    at a discount.

    I also see that you are charging a fee of $500.00 for these
    puppies. Maine is one of the most depressed areas as far as economics. Do you
    really think anyone here has the money to pay vet bills that may come up in the
    future for these dogs. The come with No pedigree, no history of genetic
    ailments that these dogs might have. Not to mention what kind of parasites or
    illness did they bring into our country.

    This is the most irresponsible thing you can do is to condone this
    practice.

    So while your all patting yourselves on the back for the good deed that
    you think you are doing, remember that somewhere in the county their are dogs
    chained up in back yards with out protection, food , water or love.

    Not to mention you are encouraging that country to continue to treat
    their animals any way that they like and we will come in and save the day!

    I’m really upset at this and hope to hear from you as to why you did this!

    Pat Small

    • Anonymous

      Guam is a United States territory Pat, not “another country”.

      If you are this upset why not call the Hancock shelter and speak with their director?

    • Anonymous

      -The adoption event at the Bangor Humane Society ‘sold out’
      – There are already 6 applications in for the dogs.

      Continue to be upset, by all means, but…why not? Puppies are in high demand, especially mutts. $500 is small change to folks buying pure bred pitts left and right.

    • Anonymous

      I have to agree with Pat,we need to take care of the welfare of animals here in Maine. Every complaint coming in needs to be checked from dogs and cats to farm animals.

    • Old Bear

      Atleast they are doing something good and its not costing us taxpayers any Maine Care or EBT cards. 

      • Anonymous

        Is that all you ever think about?

        • Old Bear

          Yes, Thank You for reading.

    • Anonymous

      I guess “disgusted” is not the adjective I was expecting to see to describe the feeling one would get from a story about people trying to save the lives of animals.

      From what I saw of the story on this on WABI last night, they said the long term goal is to introduce a spay/neuter program in Guam.

      I don’t think our country treats animals particularly well (especially given the “disgusting” weak laws around animal abuse, etc). I do agree that “charity starts at home,” but if there is an organization working on saving animals from anywhere, I can’t be disgusted by them.

      There are plenty of children in the US who need adopting yet people go to China, Africa, Haiti etc for them. Why do we give a dime to any other country when we have homeless people here, infrastructure in need of repair, some schools needing work/replacement. The point is, they are doing something to help. How can I feel anything but appreciation for that?

      Saving the lives of animals would NEVER make me feel disgusted, regardless of where they came from.  I don’t think this shelter had to euthanize 4 dogs to make room for these 4 puppies.

      •  they already have spay/neuter programs in Guam. wouldn’t the money invested in transporting 12 dogs 8 thousand miles have been better invested in a lump sum donation to that program, and therefore reduced the unwanted pet population even m ore in Guam?

        did anyone ask the donors to the shelter if they wanted their funds used to pay massive airlift expenses associated with this project?

        this article also states that the Guam shelter has received no support- this is untrue. a quick search into other relocation efforts shows they received a great deal of assistance airlifting out dozens of greyhounds when a local track closed (thanks to political pressure and the aw on unintended consequences).

        unless and until the receiving shelter is euthanizing ZERO animals, they have no right to misappropriate donations meant for Main’s animals in this way as a favor to a friend.

        the sheer waste of resources that could have been used to rehome local dogs sickens me

    • Anonymous

      Well said!  You’re obviously not alone in your thinking.

    • Guam is part of the United States, it is a territory. And may soon become a state. 

      • Anonymous

        Territories of the United States
        Territory/Year Acquired
        Midway Islands / 1867
        Puerto Rico / 1898
        American Samoa / 1899
        Virgin Islands / 1927
        Guam / 1950

    • Anonymous

      A few counterpoints:

      Maine shelters are often in need of animals, especially puppies that are in such high demand. The Bangor Humane Society literally ran out of adoptable animals at the big promotion you mentioned. Maine is picking up the slack for other areas where there is a surplus of animals. We ought to be applauding these shelters, not condemning them.

      On the cost: If you can’t afford an adoption fee for an animal, then you have no business owning one. I get so incensed when I hear of people looking for a pet, then say they “can’t afford to pay much.” Pets require food, shelter, and vet care. It all costs money. Either you have it or you don’t, and if you don’t, then don’t get a pet. Animals deserve better than to be in a home where the family is not willing to invest in their proper care.

      I hear of just as many health problems with purebred animals as with shelter pets. The genetic problems, in fact, are more common to purebreds because of the inbreeding that is often done to produce offspring with certain characteristics. These dogs will get tested and vaccinated for all the regular diseases, which is more than you get from a lot of the self-proclaimed “breeders” out there.

      Don’t believe me on the second and third points? Take a look at Uncle Henry’s. Each week there are dozens of ads — from people looking for a pet but “can’t pay much” to the people offering Labs for sale for hundreds each but no papers or shots. It’s disgusting.

      • Anonymous

        Too bad many of your points are outright wrong.  Properly bred purebreds from responsible breeders are significantly LESS likely to carry genetic problems such as hip displaysia, heart problems, blindness, patellar luxation, elbow displaysia, and von Willebrand’s to name a few, because RESPONSIBLE breeders test their dogs for all that BEFORE breeding them.  No one knows the history of a mutt, and certainly no one cared enough to test the parents for all the diseases their mix of breeds could be prone to.  Of course, the poorly bred purebreds you probably are familiar with had irresponsible breeders who don’t test either.

        Almost thirty years in sheltering and rescue as well as being a retired vet tech and professional groomer proves beyond a doubt that MONEY does NOT make a home suitable for pet ownership.  Dedication and responsibility does.  I’ve seen people with little money tend better to their pets, seeking veterinary care as needed, feeding the best food they can afford, learning how to better care for their pets and cherishing them as family members.  I have also seen very well to do owners who want to know if their groomer/vet tech neighbor can shave off the coat of their maggot-infested, neglected dog for cheaper than the vet would do it, like maybe for free. (hint, hint)  Oh, and maybe you have some cheap way to treat the systemic infection caused by the maggot infestation, or maybe even some leftover antibiotics?

        Again, I reiterate, taking on the ‘problems’ for another area does NOT incite change and education on responsible ownership.  All it does is make it painless to keep being irresponsible.  If spay/neuter education worked in your neck of the woods, (and if you need to import puppies, it HAS) spend your resources educating in areas that haven’t had adequate education in responsible ownership.

        • Anonymous

          Unfortunately, even “RESPONSIBLE breeders” are driven by the almighty dollar. I know several breeders with “good” reputations that are putting out average to below average litters.

          Your second paragraph is spot on.

          • Anonymous

            Then they are NOT responsible breeders.  I wrote this, and I stand 100% behind it.  
            http://songbrook.weebly.com/finding-a-responsible-breeder.html

            A responsible breeder will:1) be breeding to the breed’s standard..no teacup, micro, mini, imperial,king, or other goofy term for runts or oversized dogs.  No intentional”rare”, meaning unaccepted by the breed standard, colors either.2) will be actively showing or working the parents.3) will have genetic health testing done, such as OFA or PennHip, CERF,VonWillebrand’s, etc.4) will give you the results of that testing in writing5) insists on spay/neuter for pet pups.6) has a contract citing the spay/neuter clause and also offering to takeback the pup at any time for any reason for the rest of its life.7) is open, honest, and available to the new owner, and can talk about theirbreed for hours.8) does a home check before placing a pup, and will turn down homes thatmight not be suitable for a pup of their breed.9) does not put money above the well-being of their animals.If the breeder you are considering doesn’t fit these guidelines, find abetter breeder.  You are more likely to get a mentally and physicallyhealthy pup from a responsible breeder.

          • Anonymous

            I don’t disagree with you song, I am just pointing out that some breeders that people consider to be “responsible” and ethical become just the opposite when the dollars take over. It’s called greed and breeders will go to great lengths to hide that greed from their customers. As I said, I know two that the general public consider to be “responsible” and ethical but no longer turn out the litters they once did and it is because of the $$$ they make.

        • Anonymous

          Songbrook, we may agree more than you think.

          What do you think the ratio is of irresponsible breeders to responsible ones? I don’t even dare to guess but I presume it’s pretty substantial. These “purebred” puppies in Uncle Henry’s are not tested, treated, or vaccinated. Then don’t get me started on puppy mills that supply “purebred” puppies to pet stores.

          Shelter dogs are tested, treated, and vaccinated, regardless of their lineage. And there are plenty of mutts out there that are healthy and happy. Surely they are not good enough for the 1 percent, but for the other 99 percent of us, they’re perfect.

          I never meant to imply that you have to be wealthy to own a pet. But you do have to be willing to devote a certain amount of resources to their care and feeding. People who are not able or willing to pay the fee for a shelter animal are not likely to put a whole lot into vet care either. Past perfromance is the best indicator of future performance.

          OTOH, those of limited means who do provide their pets with proper care and feeding deserve kudos. That is a lot of dedication and sacrifice. I know, because I do it every day.

          • Anonymous

            Show me one shelter that OFA’s, CERF’s, or VetGen’s the dogs there, or admit shelters do NOT test their dogs.  Not one shelter in the US does testing for genetic diseases such as the ones I mentioned.  I said, ”
            Properly bred purebreds from responsible breeders are significantly LESS likely to carry genetic problems such as hip displaysia, heart problems, blindness, patellar luxation, elbow displaysia, and von Willebrand’s to name a few, because RESPONSIBLE breeders test their dogs for all that BEFORE breeding them.”  A simple vet exam can NOT pinpoint carriers or future affecteds.  

            As far as responsible vs. irresponsible breeders, if people stop making it profitable to the people who care ONLY about profit, the irresponsible breeders would be gone.  I know most responsible breeders will spend hours, days and weeks at a time teaching a newcomer who really wants to learn how to breed responsibly.  But when people can get money for letting Muffy and Ruffy ‘go at it’ just because they’re a fluffy, fashionable breed, there’s no incentive for people to BE responsible breeders.

          • Anonymous

            You know who really deserves the blame? The owners. That’s right.

            They’re the ones who rush off to buy a puppy, expecting a perfect dog that they’ve put zero research or thought into beforehand. They search in Uncle Henry’s or in a newspaper ad, and their only selection criterion is price–and usually the cheaper the better.

            These owners are the ones who think such dogs came from a “breeder,” and will proudly tell you so, despite its “papers” from bogus registries like the APR, FIC, APR, and so on. These owners are also the first ones to loudly blame their whole entire breed as being unhealthy when something inevitably goes wrong with Fido, despite the fact that their poor dog is the product of an ignorant backyard producer (or worse).

            They’re the ones who don’t socialize, properly train, or work with their puppies. They don’t crate-train. They don’t utilize their vets as important partners in their pet’s health, mental, and social well-being.

            They don’t spay or neuter. They let their dogs run loose, destroy things, and bark.

            And THEY are the ones who show up at the pounds in droves, bearing the dog itself, its new litter, or all of them, saying, “the kids lost interest,” “I don’t have the time,” “I have allergies,” or they’re “getting a divorce.”

            THEY are the true party at fault: the ones who drive off, leaving a scared, anxious, confused and often unhealthy dog behind. THEY are the ones who failed the dogs–and the good people trying to pick up the pieces in countless rescues, shelters and clinics.

      • Anonymous

        Re: the tired old (and wrong!!) saw that purebreds are somehow unhealthier than mutts:

         http://www.naiaonline.org/articles/article/the-clinical-truths-about-pure-breeds-mixed-breeds-and-designer-breeds

        Again, the facts–as opposed to emotion or opinions–tell the tale.

    • Anonymous

      Yes, Guam is a territory of the USA, and the fees ($500, I think) is due to inoculations and transport of these unfortunate animals to the US and into Maine – to name one state this is happening in.  Let’s consider the animals for a minute.  First and foremost, Maine needs to care for its own animals as people are pointing out.  But does not the entire USA state’s care for people from other countries, too?  Do not the people of these states pay high tax dollars to give these people shelter, education, job preferences, heating and home supplies, transportation, medical and dental expenses?  Nothing changes.  But at least people can get off their behinds and do something for themselves if they want to, but the poor little animals are totally helpless.  I feel sorry they too, are getting caught up in politics and all.

  • jimbobhol

    Importing dogs so you can rescue them? 

  • Bob

    I hate to say this but we have hungry children right here in this state. What is the cost to bring these animals in? Many people neglect thier pets here. Charity must start at home. We we can take care of are own then we will be in a better position to help others.

    • Anonymous

      THANK YOU!!!  My thoughts exactly!

    • Anonymous

      The costs are being paid with the adoption fee.

  • Guest

    Picking up dog poop is one thing, but when they relieve themselves in the house, that is something different. You can have them…

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, who wants animals who exhibit true, unconditional love to their people….and please don’t tell me that is what kids are for.

      • Guest

        I have no idea what you just said or why you said it. I house trained a few dogs in my day, I was saying in English if you want a dog that urinates everywhere, you can have the dog.

        • Anonymous

          And I suppose your puppies were housebroken immediately? It takes a little time and effort to housebreak even the smartest of dogs.

        • Anonymous

          For heaven’s sake, they’re PUPPIES!! All puppies pee in the wrong places before they are housebroken. These are obviously not yet housebroken but probably will be soon.

          I suppose you never soiled a diaper in your life, right? And on the off chance you did, surely it did not stink!

  • Anonymous

    We don’t have enough abused and battered animals in the USA so we have to go to Guam to get more?  Not to mention homeless and hungry CHILDREN here in the USA.  It’s a wonderful cause and I’m happy that these puppies will get a second chance at life, but come on!  WHERE are the priorities?

    • Anonymous

      tjones4 makes some excellent points above and some are very appropriate for your post too.

      “There are plenty of children in the US who need adopting yet people go to China, Africa, Haiti etc for them. Why do we give a dime to any other country when we have homeless people here, infrastructure in need of repair, some schools needing work/replacement. The point is, they are doing something to help. How can I feel anything but appreciation for that?”

      Rather insightful don’t you think?

      • Anonymous

        Very insightful indeed and I do have an appreciation for everyone having their different charities.  I’d far rather see someone helping out like this than to see those who complain and do nothing to help the causes they feel strongly about.  That being said, I guess my charities are just much different.  And that’s okay.  I just can’t seem to wrap my head around people trying to solve world problem before solving problems in their own back yard.  But hey, that’s me.

    • Guam is in the USA
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guam 

      I guess the money spent to adopt these dogs would have been better spent on EDUCATION

      • Anonymous

        It is a TERRITORY in the USA.  With all your brilliance, go ahead and read about how differently they are governed.  Last I knew, they were a very limited self-governing island whose residents could not even vote in our Presidential election.  They could serve in the military but needed to be a US citizen first.  I admit to paying little attention to what’s going on in Guam these days and it has been years since I received my high school “education”, but I think perhaps you might want to read a bit more into it before you talk about the education of others 

        • Anonymous

          Maybe if we bring enough dogs from Guam we could keep it from capsizing, Rep Hank Johnson {D GA) 3-25-2010.

        • legal brilliance; you do not need to be a U.S. citizen to serve in our military. So I think perhaps you might want to read a bit more into it before you talk about the education of others 

          • Anonymous

            Perhaps you don’t…Tell me though, can a person from Guam be a military OFFICER in the US? As I said, Guam studies isn’t at the top of my list (and also not at all what this topic is supposed to be about)

          • Anonymous

            “A person may become a United States citizen by birth or through naturalization. Generally, if you are born in the United States or born to U.S. citizens, you are born a U.S. citizen, unless you are born to a foreign
            diplomat. You are also considered a U.S. citizen at birth if you were born in Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Your birth certificate
            will be your proof of your U.S. citizenship.”

            Source – http://www.american-citizenship.org

            Guam is governed by a popularly elected governor and a unicameral 15-member legislature, whose members are known as senators. They have one non-voting member of the U.S. House of Representative and hold a straw poll for President. While they hold no “votes” in the Electoral College they do send delegates to both the Democrat and Republican National Convention.

          • Anonymous

            Yes, a person from Guam can serve as an officer in the military of the United States of America.

          • Anonymous

            Strangely enough, the government’s own website disagrees with you.  Regardless, not really a topic of great interest to me, I was more interest in the topic of the story and the point that there are so many starving children and abused animals right in our home towns that could be cared for first

        • Dear Women,  I do believe Guam none the less is still a recognized territory of the USA no matter how you slice or dice it.  I have even spent a bit of time there myself and ‘magine that I did not even need a passport to enter. 

          • Anonymous

            Yes, it is a territory. It is not recognized as one of the states. People residing there cannot vote in US elections (or at least last I knew they could not…as I said, I’m not up on my “Guam studies”…to be honest, they seem pretty irrelevant to my life. So I stick to my statement, although I find it refreshing that people are doing good, especially since we hear of nothing but crime in the news lately, my priorities are to take care of those residing in the states first and, also, to put children before animals. That being said, thankfully we all have our own charities so everyone gets attention.

  • Anonymous

    They are bringing dogs in from another country but had to ship the Warren’s dogs, Bella and Jake out of state to be adopted by strangers? Are you kidding me??? The Trenton SPCA is the next town over from Franklin; where the Warren’s live. Not that the SPCA is not doing wonderful things, however we need to take care of our own. I thought that is what we are paying our registration fees to the towns for.

    • Anonymous

      On the Warren’s dogs’ dilemma, you have to wonder whether the ACO who found them had some sort of sweetheart deal with the breed-specific rescue organization that took them and ultimately adopted them out. I just find it odd that so little effort was put toward finding the owner of those two obviusly well cared-for dogs. Such a sad state of affairs.

  • Anonymous

    Seriously??  We have overrun animal shelters  now and many are No Kill which makes not sense.  Shut down homeless shelters for people who truly are down and out on their luck? That’s okay to do…but we bring in animals from other states nad other countries to support?  Not wise.  Guam has a huge over population of dogs?  So does the US. 

    • Anonymous

      We don’t have an overpopulation problem. We do have a rampant shelter-mismanagement problem. Importing dogs, while it may feel good, is definitely not the answer, especially when exorbitant “adoption” fees are attached that could have been put to far better use here at home.

  • Anonymous

    When I was on Guam in the late 60’s early 70’s they were eating dogs. Guess they gave that up.

  • Anonymous

    Between 2003-2010 Maine’s laws against dog breeding became the second most regressive laws in the nation because of “Maine’s terrible dog over-population problem.”  Now we are importing puppies from the jungles of Guam for shelters to sell?  Something is very wrong with this picture.Many of Maine’s shelter directors supported the testimony of controversial national groups claiming Maine had a “terrible dog over-population problem” a few short years ago.  These shelters were importing puppies and dogs from outside of Maine at the same time they were claiming Maine had a “terrible dog over-population problem.” 
     
    In a special meeting held last November, Maine State Veterinarian Dr. Donald Hoenig presented a study that extrapolated that at least 6,000 puppies and dogs are imported into Maine for sale by shelters each year.  The numbers are extrapolated because Maine’s private shelters are not required to be transparent or accountable to the public.  This practice of shelters importing dogs and puppies is not new, and has been taking place for many years particularly since Hurricane Katrina in 2005. 
     
    Simple math shows that, at 6,000 dogs and puppies per year imported into Maine since 2005, as many as 42,000 dogs and puppies have potentially been brought into our state for sale–tax-free–by Maine’s shelters.
     
    We need to get beyond the warm and fuzzy, “feel good” public relations spin and take a very close look at this very controversial practice.

    • Anonymous

      Please explain the word “regressive” it is used here all the time and I do not think everyone has the same meaning, except that if something is “regressive” it is bad.  Does it only have meaning in context? Many words used today have to be taken in context. If one were to say “the concert was bad”, did the speaker mean the concert was lousy, or the concert was great. Misuse of words only leads to misinterpertation. Say what you mean in terms that say what you mean.

    • Anonymous

      I am in total agreement, Jay.  What right does government have to restrict and essentially destroy the rights of their own people on the premise that there’s an ‘overpopulation’ of pets, when the importation and trafficking of pets from all over the world isn’t penalized solely because the importer/trafficker calls itself a ‘non-profit’?  Let’s be clear on what is going on here, and in MANY East coast shelters.  Local strays of undesirable color, age, or parentage are being destroyed because ‘no one wants them’.  To have a ‘product’ for the public to consume, dogs of desirable color and young age are being imported and trafficked from other parts of the world and other states.  So HOW is that ANY different that a pet shop?!?!  The pet shop carries what sells.  Now, so do ‘shelters’.

      Furthermore, the ‘need’ to import to get puppies to meet the consumer demand is irrefutable proof that spay/neuter education WORKS.  When you go scarfing up puppies from other areas and countries, what incentive are you providing for pet owners where educations hasn’t been introduced widely enough there to learn to be responsible and spay/neuter if they aren’t going to become educated, responsible breeders?  Why should they bother to learn if there’s some fool willing to buy up their ‘mistakes’?

      I’ve been in sheltering and rescue for going on thirty years, and seeing this change from a labor of love and a desire to do our part to a booming business breaks my heart.  I was the one who had to go through a shelter and turn those cards, selecting the ones who had to die today to make room for the ones coming in today.  It was no easier turning a card over for an old, big black dog than it was for a puppy.  Now, they don’t even HAVE to euthanize for space, but they kill so they can bring in more salable ‘product’, killing older dogs so they can import puppies.  It makes me cry for all the sweet, lovable 2-6 year old dogs I had to hold the leg of and shove a needle into as they licked my hand.  And all the large, short haired, plain black 16 week old puppies I turned the cards on because there were fluffy, spotted 8 week old puppies waiting in a box in the lobby for a kennel to stay in.

      I can’t even finish what I wanted to say because the tears make it too hard to type.

      • The SPCA of Hancock County is a no/low kill shelter.

      • Anonymous

        Thank you. All we can do is keep trying to educate the masses (who, by and large, don’t have a clue).

      •  Sorta like the “too many girls” in China issue.,…

    • Anonymous

      Thank you, Jay. You’re so right. Keep getting the message out.

  • Anonymous

    Whether it makes any sense at all, someone feels good about it, that is what is important. As long as it makes that person feel good about them self it makes sense. SIIIIGHHHH.

    • Anonymous

      As it is hard to determine solely in type, can I assume you are being sarcastic?

      • Anonymous

        I suppose there is some sarcasm there, but more importantly there are many people on this board that don’t seem to think, they just feel.

  • Anonymous

    There are high kill shelters here in the US that euthanize hundreds, even thousands  of dogs a year. I feel bad for the dogs of Guam, but the dogs of Alabama could use a home, too.

    • Anonymous

      I adopted one of those Alabama pups last month. She is a precious little (getting big fast) addition to our family and we love her to death!

    • Anonymous

      The dogs of Alabama could come to Maine instead of dogs from Guam. Think about it.

  • This is all about $$$$$$.  Purebreds and PUPPIES SELL.  Large mixed breed black pit bull/hound type dogs do NOT sell well and if they do it is for very little.  Hancock KNOWS they can easily get $500 for these puppies.  They have brought in puppies JUST as a retail PETSTORE would do.  I think they need to pay for the licensing and abide by the exact same rules as a retail as they obviously acting as a retail store.  They should also have to pay the exact same in taxes as a retail does.  It is absurd the number of Rescues and Shelters who are hiding behind their 503 status so they can avoid paying taxes while operating as a retail store.  There are even Rescues who are now BUYING pregnant dogs so they can resell the puppies!

    • Anonymous
    • Anonymous

      Utterly disgusting–and right on. Thank you.

  • Anonymous

    Guam?? seriously??.. we are writing about bringing dogs from GUAM to MAINE? and then charging 500 for them.. twice the fee ( which is already way too high) of “regular’ shelter dogs.  here’s an idea.. DON”T BUY THEM..
    Maine shelters ( read pet stores) have an “island hopping campaign”.. honestly if it were not so ridiculous it would be funny..
    These people see a way to make $$$$$.. pay no taxes .. get free “product” to sell and watch it walk out the door.. interesting fact though.. 20% of animals in shelters were bought from a shelter to begin with.. wonder how many of these “boonies” will be returned if purchased for the big bucks.. twice the fee.. why?
    I thought the idea behind “castrate everything in sight” was to close the shelter doors.. or at least cut WAY down in employees, volunteers etc.. seems like the paid people at the “shelter” need to keep the product coming in order to get paid..
    Dog forbid they should be unemployed due to cut backs.. like the rest of the state..

  • Anonymous

    It seems that Maine has a dilemma.   Local shelters in Maine have a low supply of adoptable dogs on hand (kudos to the state of Maine for a low population of stray and unwanted dogs)….and animal lovers in Maine want to adopt, not buy.  So when a shelter cannot convince a family with young children to adopt a nice pitbull or chow mix, what is a responsible person supposed to do?  Many rescue groups are filling this need by partnering with high kill shelters elsewhere around the country and bringing to the state adoptable dogs and puppies that otherwise would have been euthanized.    Responsible shelters and rescue groups do not ‘sell’ animals to the public – ask people who have been turned down for adoption for one reason or another through a lengthy application process.  Pet stores will sell to anyone, anytime.   A quality breeder wll rehome puppies that are returned as opposed to euthanizing them.  It is important to do your homework and research all  options.   Hancock Co may have had good intentions; but as for me,  I will support a good animal sanctuary over a humane society any day. 

    • Anonymous

      Thank you.

  • Anonymous

    One might think, from the level of heated volleying in these comments, that taxpayer dollars were being spent on this canine resettlement. As long as this effort is privately funded, and as long as local animals are not being turned away from shelters, where’s the harm in saving a few pups from Guam? 

    • Anonymous

      Quite a bit, actually:

       http://www.naiaonline.org/naia-library/articles/humane-or-insane/

  • Anonymous

    For anybody who still believes pet overpopulation is the main problem responsible for shelter deaths, here’s proof it’s not the whole picture by a mile.

    Nathan Winograd (an attorney and animal advocate/activist) has been saying this for years…for a really eye-opening read on what’s really wrong with shelters, and the many issues that accompany bringing pets into the US for adoption when so many others in already here and in shelters around the country get euthanized instead, check out his wonderful “Redemption:”

    http://www.amazon.com/Redemption-Myth-Overpopulation-Revolution-America/dp/0979074312/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1335469177&sr=8-1

    Another good article on Winograd and his findings:

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2007/10/02/petscol.DTL

    I have no connection, but attended a symposium where Winograd spoke and I find the facts (actual facts, as opposed to emotions) pretty compelling. Bringing dogs into the US, while it may feel good, ignores the real plight of so many adoptable pets already here who don’t get to live due to mismanagement in their shelters.

  • Anonymous

    This explains why importing dogs for resale (let’s call a spade a spade–it’s NOT “adoption”) in the US should be viewed with a jaundiced eye:

    Be sure to see “Flies in the Ointment” and “Health Matters.”

    http://www.naiaonline.org/naia-library/articles/humane-or-insane/

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