November 24, 2017
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Comments for: Teacher evaluation bill awaits LePage’s OK

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  • StillRelaxin

    LePage has already shown his distain for teachers by gouging (COLA cuts) into retirement pensions of teachers who’ve already given a lifetime of service to the public. Now he’s coming after teachers who are still working in our schools. Guess those Fathers at his Parochial school were very-very hard on him as a boy. The bully will have his payback now, teachers and the public with have theirs in November. Anyone out there thinking about going into education? There’s no better or clearer time than now to change your mind and find a career that’s still respected.

    • Anonymous

      Did I miss something, or does nowhere in that article it say anything about him “going after” current teachers?

      Unless you somehow interpreted “…develop comprehensive performance evaluation systems for teachers and principals” as such, in which case, congratulations you have mastered the art of spin.

      • Anonymous

        Like i said say the put all the slow learners an handy cap kids in one class an those kids don’t pass who’s fault will that be ?

  • Anonymous

    As I’ve always maintained, the education of our children is paramount. That said, we need to have the highest quality teachers possible. Why are we wasting time and money and jeapordizing our children’s education with “professional improvement plans”? I’ve had fantastic teachers who were just starting out and fantastic teachers who had been there 35 years. I had terrible teachers in both groups as well. Some people have it or they don’t. 

    Now, that’s not to say that teachers are not highly-qualified professionals whom we should completely respect and compensate accordingly. But for those who are not qualified, it is a disservice to everyone to keep them around.

    • StillRelaxin

      I agree 100%. The question is, why don’t administrators get rid of them in the 1st year when they can “For any reason or NO reason at all?” Even after that 1st year, since there is no such thing as “Tenure” in this State for grade school teachers any one of them can be gotten rid of…again as long as their administrators are doing their due diligence to document poor performance on a variety of levels. If you want to know why a few poor teachers exist all you have to do is look at what their administrators don’t do.

      • Anonymous

        First, do you expect anyone in any profession, let alone something as involved as classroom teaching, to be an expert in the very first year?  That is crazy.  It is always so interesting to listen to the talking heads who have never spent a single second teaching a class second guessing those who do. 

      • asportsfan

        It’s actually the first two years that teachers do not have continuing contract and can be let go at any time and not be told a reason why.

  • Anonymous

    The amount of “teaching” at the secondary level (at least in the town I’m familiar with) has gone down to almost nothing in most classes.  Since teachers were given laptops to have access to all day long it seems that some are stuck at their desks with their attention on the screen and not on the kids.  Giving kids work to keep them busy while you spend time on the computer is not effective teaching.  I’m by no means saying that all teachers do this but I have witnessed this more and more in the high school classrooms and it seems that kids are being held responsible for information that hasn’t even been taught — they are expected to completely teach themselves information, teachers hand out test on material not covered by a teacher — before going back to their desk and laptop. I’m in the high school a lot — I’ve been in the elementry and middle schools too but have not noticed this. Perhaps high school kids are supposed to learn on their own — I don’t know

    • Anonymous

      You can’t paint with broad brushes.  Did you talk to the teachers about just what they were doing with the computers?  How they were using them?  What the activities were?  Were you there the whole time for the entire unit?  It sounds like you are doing a lot of assuming here.  You might want to acquire some more information first.

      • Anonymous

        I listen to the teachers talk about what they use their computers during classtime for — I’m not painting with a broad brush — I’m just saying that in the school that I’m familiar with there is a lot of non educational computer use going on in the classroom during what should be educational time.  I also said that I don’t see this in the lower grade classrooms.  I’m not sure where your thinking I’m painting with a broad brush.  I see and listen to what goes on around me — so yes I do feel that I’ve acquired enough information to speak on what I see happening around me.

  • Anonymous

    If teachers shouldn’t be evaluated then maybe my income shouldn’t be evaluated.

  • Anonymous

    Ok so what happens if they pile all the very slow learns an handy cap kids on one teacher an they do not pass ??

  • Anonymous

    What I want to know is when we are going to start evaluating cops, and firemen, and social workers, and doctors of all kinds, and transportation workers of all kinds, and water and sewer system workers, and corrections officers, and prison wardens, etc. etc. for “effectiveness”.  Fine to try to find a better way to evaluate educators in places where it is not being done now, as long as it is FAIR and DOABLE,
    but why not evaluate ALL public employees for “effectiveness” and also any PRIVATE entities contracted with PUBLIC dollars?  Let’s see how “effective” EVERYONE is and not just continue to go after teachers, most of whom are very dedicated and EFFECTIVE public servants who do the best they can with what they have.  We say we should not overregulate business.  Well, you also can not overregulate public entities either.  There is only so much time and so much resource for the schools and teachers to work with.  Fine to have better evaluations, but there are MANY regulations on the schools.  Endless rivers of them.  And at some point enough is enough.  You can not have endless rivers of mandates on ANY organization because it becomes too expensive and undoable. 

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