Comments for: Maine Senate delays action on health insurance exchange

Posted April 05, 2012, at 1:20 p.m.
Last modified April 05, 2012, at 5:48 p.m.

AUGUSTA | The Republican-controlled Maine Senate passed a bill Thursday that avoids setting up a health insurance exchange as outlined in the federal Affordable Care Act. LD 1497 delays any action until the U.S. Supreme Court rules on constitutional challenges of the federal health care reform law. If the …

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  • Anonymous

    “Under the Affordable Care Act, states are required to set up the exchanges by 2014.”
    With all the hullabaloo surrounding the ACA (the upcoming SCOTUS decision and further implementation of the law by the feds), it seems silly to set up the exchanges this early.  Simply waiting until there is more information will probably be the most efficient way to go about this.  It seems like Eric Russell is just trying to make this into a bigger deal than it is, because this seems pretty logical.

  • And again we see the GOP and the Tea Party doing all they can to stall the inevitable. Folk’s, you can stall all you want but the ACA is coming, even if SCOTUS rules against it. It’s just gonna’ come out as the ACHA in another form and we all know it. That Maine’s GOP-controlled Senate is stalling also tells me that the current insurance carrier here, namely Anthem, is almost paniced over this ACA Exchange being created. It means, for them, the end of a near monopoly on the insurance market they’ve had and that they are gonna have to face OPEN COMPETITION for the first time (Gee, aren’t Republican’s and TP’rs all for open market competition ? ) and that the end is in sight for those GOP folk’s who have been receiving huge amounts of campaign contributions from the insurance industry to KEEP OUT OTHER COMPETITOR’S that threaten the current monopoly ‘stranglehold’ on the market here in Maine.

    And for those of you who are so determined to kill the ACA think of this. If ACA goes under then the only other option that’s ready to go, right now, that is more SCOTUS-proofed than the ACA is Public Option (Universal Single Payer). People, ACA / USP / PO. it’s coming. No matter what you want to call it, or try to make it out to be, it’s coming. And the sooner the better given that a huge number of people, nationwide, are all suffering and going thru bankruptcy’s due to insanely huge medical bill’s, which is what caused all of this in the first place. Contribute options and changes all you can but do you really want to start seeing people die simply because someone’s life is dependent on a bank balance ? That, my friend’s, is what you’re gonna have to ask yourself in the mirror tomorrow morning and live with it.

    • Anonymous

      Excellent post!

  • If health insurance exchanges are a good idea, and conservatives seem to think they are, why not get them started whether the ACA is ruled unconstitutional or not?  Exchanges are seen as a market-based influence on more affordable insurance.  Isn’t that what conservatives like? 

    If the Supreme Court strikes down the ACA, it will be mostly because of the mandate.  But forbidding states from allowing businesses to operate within a state can’t possibly be unconstitutional. 

  • Anonymous

    Exchanges=a way for small businesses and individuals to buy health care without having to pay higher rates because they aren’t a big group.  Who gains from stopping this?  Insurance companies and big businesses.  Who loses?  Small businesses, people who live outside of big cities.  Maine.

  • Anonymous

    Exchange planning is underway in several states. What kinds
    of real-world questions are states considering? 
    http://www.healthcaretownhall.com/?p=4008

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