November 24, 2017
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Comments for: New wind turbine at Rockport high school now producing energy

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  • Anonymous

    Except to demonstrate that young people are willing to explore alternatives forms of energy, I don’t know why this paper even bothered to publish this report . It’s well established that wind turbines in most areas don’t even come close to competing economically with other sources of energy. The fact remains they likely will never be feasible in most places for use commercially since wind energy is far too dispersed to be captured efficiently. I’ve seen too many of these turbines abandoned after breaking down, a testimony that they aren’t worth investing in.

    • Anonymous

      The paper published this story because, among other reasons, the RSU will save $18,000 this year.  Perhaps you don’t find that newsworthy, but I’m guessing Rockport’s taxpayers do.

      • Anonymous

        I wonder at whose expense this savings is being realized. The tax payer maybe?

      • Anonymous

        Let’s do a very short exercise here.  This turbine costs half a million dollars and the average lifespan of these units is 8-12 years.  I’m going to be generous and say it’ll last 15 years for the purpose of this exercise.   Let’s also just not even count the $100,000 -150,000  maintenance would cost over those years.  And finally let’s just forget the total decommissioning costs.  So you have 3 big “gimmees’  there right?

        So if the only cost is the $5ook original cost, and it runs mainteneance free for 15 years, and there will be no cost for taking it down, that still comes out to a cost of $33,333. per year.  So if it generates $18,000. in power, you still are $15,333. in the hole every year.  

        I realize that the school apparently didn’t pay anything for this specific turbine, and I applaud the efforts of the students and staff to do this significant “experiment”. 

        I just ask that you keep excellent records not only of how much power it produces but also how many hours per month it actually produces, etc.  The reason I ask is that there are many wind power ‘snake oil salesmen’ selling these types of turbine units (and the large grid scale units) who insist that they’re going to pay off quickly in energy savings and that’s patently false. 

        I’ve done a lot of research on this subject and I’ve yet to find a varifiable example of where a turbine paid for it’s original costs, errection costs, maintenance costs, interest costs on the loan,  and finally the decommissioning costs.  You can’t even break even over the lifespan of these turbines, never mind actually “making” money.  

        • Anonymous

          Maybe you are right..It will never have the returns of Maine Yankee! LOL  Maybe they could have considered a mini nuke or even a small coal-fired power plant.  I can’t understand why anyone would try to throw water on the enthusiasm of these kids. Someone has been listening the Koch Bros too much.

          • Anonymous

            Perhaps if part of the program would have included real world science and economic cost analysis, this would have been a good project. There was none.
            This is a fad enriched , un-economic childrens farce. Little real science, fewer facts, no economic reality.

      • Anonymous

         $18,000.o0 is not accurate.   Estimates range from $8000.00 to $15000.00.  That is 62 years to 33 years to pay off.  And, that is not counting maintenance costs, OR, the federal money subsidizing. 

      • Anonymous

        The kids should be lauded for working hard even though they were likely fed bad information during much of the project. For if the info was good, nobody would have wanted to build a wind turbine given how terribly poor they are as power sources.

        I suggest you read the following about the bad tradeoff that is industrial wind power in Maine. The students might benefit by reading the downloadable PDF and having a debate. By the way, the stats come right from the belly of the beast – NRCM:
        http://www.windtaskforce.org/page/nrcm-s-co2-analysis 

        Then they might read the following about the abysmal failure of the University of Maine’s $2 million turbine:

        http://www.windtaskforce.org/page/maine-s-public-turbines 

        Once there, click on the PDF in the article “8/3/11 – A Brief History of University of Maine’s $2 Million Wind Turbine Experiment (49 page PDF document)”

      • Patten_Pete

        An excellent school classroom discussion topic would be a book such as the following:

        “Indoctrination: How ‘Useful Idiots’ Are Using Our Schools to Subvert American Exceptionalism” by Kyle Olson

  • Anonymous

    If the students went through all this work, the fund raising, the legal stuff, the planning,and so on, why did they not placed a turbine there that would produce all the power the school could use? It does not make since that after all of this the school still has to buy power from outside sources. It produced enough power to supply six houses a months supply of power but not enough to keep the school running without buying more? BUT let messy, good job students on doing all the work needed to make this happen.

    • Anonymous

      Yes hats off to all the inquisitive students that had been involved with this project. From a parent, Engineering standpoint the numbers will not work in the schools or tax payers advantage. Since only a segment of the population now nows what the turbines are really about lets educate the Governments on what is real and what are lies coming from big wind. The only way a turbine will work to save anybody real cash is if you build your own with your own material your own labor for your own house and charge back to the grid. This is the only way to save money.It’s the same principle as solar panels. When a solar system is installed it is not installed to power the neighborhood it only benefits the home owner but truly helps in saving energy because of the low overhead.         ——–Got Vision——–

  • Anonymous

    I commend the kids for getting the science and terminology correct.. Chelsea Hunter correctly referred to the turbine producing 3000 kWh of energy. This is an accurate and useful statement. Unlike with other stories about wind turbines which refer to nameplate capacity. Capacity tells you nothing about how much power was produced. (A 2 MW turbine that never turns produces nothing, for example.)

    However, I must point out that this was a huge financial waste. $500,000 was raised to pay for erecting the turbine. If it indeed produces $18,000 worth of electricity per year, it will take almost 28 years for the turbine to pay for itself, not including any maintenance costs.

    Far better if the students had raised the $500,000 to create an endowment for the school. Invest the money in a US Treasury at 3% and the school would earn $15,000 every year starting immediately.

    After 28 years, the school would have earned $420,000….. and it would still have the $500,000 endowment.

    • Anonymous

       I’m not going to argue with your numbers, but what these students learned by tackling a project like this is priceless.  I don’t think they would have got the same experience buying a bond.  These students obviously worked hard and were able to apply what they were learning directly in their community.  Raising $500,000 is pretty amazing (by the way, I doubt anyone is going to give $500,000 for the students to by a government bond).  In a time when our state drives teachers and students to memorize for a test, this is a hopeful sign.

      • Anonymous

        I agree they learned a priceless lesson.

        They learned how the public sector spends Other People’s Money, without concern as to cost-effectiveness. There is no need to analyze how much actual good was achieved so long as everyone feels good in the end.

        Hopefully some of the students will learn that when you are spending Other People’s Money, you have a duty to ensure that it is wisely spent. You should make sure that you get the biggest bang for the buck, as it were.

        What a great opportunity to give the students a lesson in economics, frugality, and financial analysis.

        • Guest

          I agree the students involved are the ‘poster children’ for sanctioned spending of Other People’s Money.  But these aren’t children, they are of the age group of genius-level creativity.

          $500,000 was an enormous amount of money raised.  The donor list is probably available.

          I also wonder how many students not in the group were opposed to the project, and, how many parents.   I don’t think anyone should get overly excited about this kind of “youthful enthusiasm.”

          • Patten_Pete

            These students are unwitting pawns.  I’d guess that if you dig you will find lefty-green associations with their teacher.

            When citizens rightfully object to feckless wind power and the wind industry criticizes them for attacking students, the students move from being unwitting pawns to unwitting “human shields” for a criminal industry.

          • Guest

            Anyone’s use of words like “lefty-green,” only serves to obscure the  power and control that drives the world.  It’s not a matter of  political allegiance. 

            Do you think that those with power to control are not wise to this method of obscuring realities that only serve to divide and bring them more profit?

            Ignorance and lust for power has no other allegiance but to itself.

            This project was about as “lefty green,” (or supply any other convenient political leaning slur), as pencils are airplanes.

            “Against stupidity the gods themselves struggle in vain.”  Friederich von Schiller

          • Anonymous

            Yes a criminal industry indeed, for too long these wind turbines have been raping our poor children of their innocents.  We must pray to god now for it is oil and coal that has brought our world into a glorious age of freedom! For if things keep dieing there will always be oil and coal!  TO WAR MY FELLOW ‘MERICANS!

    • Anonymous

      It is too bad all that money could have gone into other forms of green energy that work. Like the solar paint that is almost ready for production.Look it up.  Now this is a breakthrough. Another Form of green energy is to build a National Monorail System with enough power production to not only power up the grid but will also run it self. Sorry all you old school engineers thermal dynamics is changing as you know it.     ——Got Vision——-

      • Anonymous

        There is a proposal to run HVDC under the turnpike R.O.W.  conveying Hydro Quebec power to Boston. A high speed monorail could plug into the power line; providing high speed commuter rail and revenue from leasing the R.O.W.  Talk about a major tourist attraction…from Portland jetport to Baxter state park in a few hours!

    • Anonymous

      at the rate of the deflation of the US dollar in 28 years the $500,00o dollars will be worth .05 cents… 
      as the rate of energy costs skyrocket and fossil fuels become extinct this windmill will be priceless…

      • Anonymous

        1) Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities. The principal of the bond is adjusted with inflation so as to hold your investment level in constant dollars.2) You say the windmill is priceless. Actually, it is worse than worthless. It will not last the 28 years needed just to break even. When all is said and done, it will have been a net drain for the community.3) For $500,000 to be worth only 5 cents (constant dollars) in 28 years requires a 78% annual inflation rate.  No need to worry about the windmill or school then, just try to stay alive in the Mad Max Thunderdome future you envision.

      • Anonymous

        You’ve gotta be kidding! Priceless! Wind energy will never by feasible (except maybe in a far away place like an island) simply because it is far too dispersed. If and when fossil fuels become harder to obtain, other forms of energy will have already replaced it, but certainly not energy procured through wind turbines.

        • Anonymous

          My satirical statement were to show how anything can happen in the future. You are basing your statement on the past and applying them to the future like everything is going to go on as it has in the past. Unless you can see the future you can not even guess what may happen 28 years from now and neither can I.  Maybe our sun explodes tomorrow and all we have left is a dark cold windy planet.  Hmm I guess that wind turbine would be looking pretty darn good .. Maybe a generator that uses the same wind speed but produces 20x more power is conceived in the next couple years and is retrofitted to this base.  YOU do not know or control the future so spout all you want your facts of the past adapted to the future, the truth remains you do not know the future nor do I.  Lets just keep sucking the life out of Mother Earth till its a dead frozen rock with an atmosphere the suns rays can not penetrate and just see where we are in 28 years.

          • Anonymous

            You’re dreaming. Even if a relatively large wind turbine worked at 100% efficiency by capturing all the wind energy passing through it, it would not be feasible because the total wind energy passing through it is not nearly sufficient to meet the monthly demands of a single household. But lets assume I’m wrong and twenty years from now a new technology makes harnessing wind energy feasible economically. What are we to do in the meantime? Use current expensive and inadequate technology that can provide no more than 3% or the entire needs for this state with a massive government program? That won’t help save much fossil fuel considering all the fuel energy and natural resources used in the manufacturing and installation of these electric generating wind devices. This idea has been tossed around now for several years without any real hope of catching on. It’s far better to expend our resources looking for better ways to provide our future energy needs. For example, one of these days all you will might need is a nuclear power plant the size of the power plant in a submarine to furnish the energy needs of several thousand people. The likelihood of this becoming feasible within the next 20 years is very good. 

          • Patten_Pete

            We have a 160 year supply of clean U.S. natural gas to bridge us  and the history of science teaches there will be presently unimaginable energy breakthroughs in that period.

            But they sure will not involve the low density energy source of wind.

    • Anonymous

      Yes, and the students would not have been challenged into contemplating productive careers in engineering and technology, helping the nation in seeking long-term alternatives to importing expensive, and mostly dirty energy.  Our alternative energy solutions are still in the early stages. Give it time and any fostered ingenuity among today’s students and we will solve the energy conundrum. Teaching students to clip coupons isn’t the way forward.

      • Anonymous

        Challenging students into contemplating productive careers in engineering and technology is exactly what I want.

        Wasting $500,000 on an investment with ZERO payback is not productive.

    • Anonymous

      Well stated truth about wind power.

      At best, only 30% of that 3,000 kWh will be produced; and who wants to go to a school buffeted by 25 mph winds anyway?

      Like the UMPI turbine, when people learn the operating facts the hard way; the propaganda line will switch to ‘it’s an educational tool’.

      Only Maine’s elites and 1% will understand.

  • Anonymous

    Damning the best efforts  and enthusiasm of Maine’s young  adults, the hope of the future,  with faint praise. “The way life should be.”

    • Anonymous

      Unless someone calls the emperor’s new clothes for what they are, the kids will be led down the garden path of dogma.

      • Anonymous

        You gotta start considering the impact of the reflexive negative reaction to any new idea  or technology that is proposed,considered, or described, that is so popular on this site and may well be a good barometer of the thinking of many. ..   Anyone who tries to reinvent or improve any aspect of “The way life should be” in Maine in spite of the many obvious cumulative failures that abound in the place, will run full tilt into it.  The Pied Piper isn’t leading these kids down the paths out of state.  Its lack of opportunity and the lack of will and imagination to reinvent the economy.  Once again to quote Mr. A. Lincoln, Americas greatest leader and noted federalist devil; “We must disenthrall ourselves and then we shall save our country.”

        • Anonymous

          Wind power is in fact an OLD technology not a new one. The modern variety of wind turbine has been feeding off mammoth government subsidies (MY money) for 20 years and the wind industry, led by the AWEA every year begs for the subsidies with the cry of an addict “just this time, just one more time”.

          Until such time that the laws of physics change, wind will remain an extremely low density energy source. Stand in a river and you will drown. Touch a natural gas combuster and you will burn yourself. Stand in a wind and hear yourself remark, “that breeze feels good”.

          Even worse, its unpredictability means it cannot be depended upon. Thus natural gas plants need to be burning fuel all the time, being kept on simmer, but producing zero electricity, for the inevitable moment they are called upon to ramp up to fill in for the turbines that suddenly stop turning. In the REAL WORLD what happens is that because wind cannot be counted on, when ISO-NE is lining up supply for the next day’s demand, wind cannot legally be used for it cannot be relied upon. So a sufficient supply of extra fuel, usually natural gas, is purchased in the day ahead electricity market. If and when the wind blows the next day, we are forced to buy it due to these bogus green laws, lobbied for by ENRON. Yet it is totally unneeded at that point so the ratepayer pays twice.

          Look into the history of modern day wind and renewable energy certificates and you will quickly see how much of today’s scam was fathered by ENRON, one of America’s all time criminal organizations.

          Speaking of criminal organizations, in the REAL WORLD we have seen tremendous MAFIA connections to the wind industry.

          Just read the following:
          http://www.environmentalleader.com/2009/11/17/mafia-tied-to-wind-fraud-in-italy/

    • Anonymous

      NO, just damning the stupidity of the faculty member/s who was instrumental in buying into the wind power hoax.  Maybe the students would have been much better off had they learned one of life’s valuable lessons …do your research BEFORE you make a decision to waste half a million dollars, not after.  Was no one on the faculty aware of the “educational experiment” that UMPI was conducting that turned out to be a miserable failure?

      By the way, how much of the $500k was donated by the wind lobby and/or wind develpers?  The wind lobby is so well funded (by your tax dollars) that they spend enormous amounts of money on trying to influence the next generations into believing that wind power works.  Did you know that they even created a “wind power merit badge” for Girl Scouts?  A lot like McDonald’s ploy of having “playgrounds” within their facilities … get ’em hooked at a very young age and you’ll have a customer for life.  How’s all that “Supersizing” working for our grossly obese younger generation?

      • Guest

        Wind turbines — “the Cardiff Giant(s)” of our times.

        “Hull…anxious for the glory in history which comes from successful achievement, again
        gave to the press a full account of his part in the affair, confirming what he
        had previously stated, showing how he planned it, executed it, and realized a
        goodly sum for it; how Barnum wished to purchase it from him; and how, above
        all, he had his joke at the expense of those who, though they had managed to
        overcome him in argument, had finally been rendered ridiculous in the sight of
        the whole country.”

        http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/cardiff.htm

      • Anonymous

        I see. Stupid teachers misleading the inexperienced youngsters until they are hopelessly contaminated.  Well maybe some forward thinking teachers can steer the kids into investing in toxic waste dumps or infusions of capital into manufacturing zombies like paper mills to keep the economic boom alive. Make “damned with faint praise” just plain “damned” period.
        Get these teachers and their infected students the hell out of Maine.

        • Anonymous

          Any product has to be useful in the real world of economics. We know we could not exist without fossil fuels.
          We know how to cost compare the btu value of wind to that of  other electrical generators.
          How does wind meet the criteria every electrical generating source must meet?

          Any electric utility must meet the following, well known in the industry to survive.

          Did the teachers look at any of this real world information known by the electrical industry.
           
          Defying the laws of thermodynamics is the theme of this article, along with the religious fervor of the climate computerized theories that defy reality.

          Dense energy sources are needed to power modernity.

          How does wind meet the criteria every electrical generating source must meet?
           
          1.The source must provide large amounts of electrons (it must be dense)
          2.The power must be reliable and predictable.
          3.The electrons must be dispatchable (high or low amount must be generated on demand)
          4.It must serve one or more grid demand elements(base load, load following and peak load).
          5.The utilization of environment must be minimal and compactness is a must, or it is non-green and damaging the environment.
          6.It must be economical

          I dare say students and teachers alike need an education.

          Wind , quite frankly , is a farce  and a political subsidy scam using finite taxpayer dollars.

          We also know it will seriously increase  our electrical costs if allowed to continue on its merry politcal way.

          That is why it is ashame science and economics took a back stage to this fad project.

          • Anonymous

             Like I said all the answers just no vision and no solutions.

        • Anonymous

          Yup, with comments like that you’re a squirrel alright.  This is at least the third school in Maine to “experiment” with wind turbines.  The other two were miserable failures.  How many more times must we learn this expensive lesson before someone says “No” to the next one!  

  • Anonymous

    Glad to hear that the school’s turbines are not as noisy as the ones on Vinalhaven!  Wise choice not to get an industrial sized turbine like the ones in Vinalhaven  which would be a constant annoyance to wind supporters and faculty alike!  As is, the turbines on Vinalhaven are not only noisy, but are also  losing money, NOT  saving it for islanders.  Check out this graph on Vinalhaven’s energy rates which have gone UP since the turbines were erected.  
    http://fiwn.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/fiec-rate-graph1.jpg   If islanders were buying electricity off of the grid from the mainland, they would be paying almost half what they are now.

    • Why is it that those living closest to the FIW turbines don’t have a problem with the noise? Why is it that those who have brought the law suit against the communities of the Fox Islands are deep pocketed and don’t work on the islands, and who hav e refused to work with residents of both islands and instead have waged a negative, misinformation campaign?  Your graph is another example of misleading info. It fails to look at what we would be paying today and what the costs over the next 10 years will be. Do you have any decency? Do you understand what it takes to raise a family out here and how many many working islanders are benefiting from the decision to invest in a power source they collectively own and that has exceeded power projections?

      • Patten_Pete

        Vinalhaven – “The Island Where Wind Proponents Throw Suffering Neighbors Under the Bus”.

        Reminds one of “The Lottery”.

        “The crowd was quiet. A girl whispered, “I hope it’s not Nancy,” and the sound of the whisper reached the edges of the crowd.”It’s not the way it used to be.” Old Man Warner said clearly. “People ain’t the way they used to be.””All right,” Mr. Summers said. “Open the papers. Harry, you open little Dave’s.”Mr. Graves opened the slip of paper and there was a general sigh through the crowd as he held it up and everyone could see that it was blank. Nancy and Bill. Jr.. opened theirs at the same time. and both beamed and laughed. turning around to the crowd and holding their slips of paper above their heads.”Tessie,” Mr. Summers said. There was a pause, and then Mr. Summers looked at Bill Hutchinson, and Bill unfolded his paper and showed it. It was blank.”It’s Tessie,” Mr. Summers said, and his voice was hushed. “Show us her paper. Bill.”Bill Hutchinson went over to his wife and forced the slip of paper out of her hand. It had a black spot on it, the black spot Mr. Summers had made the night before with the heavy pencil in the coal company office. Bill Hutchinson held it up, and there was a stir in the crowd.”All right, folks.” Mr. Summers said. “Let’s finish quickly.”Although the villagers had forgotten the ritual and lost the original black box, they still remembered to use stones. The pile of stones the boys had made earlier was ready; there were stones on the ground with the blowing scraps of paper that had come out of the box Delacroix selected a stone so large she had to pick it up with both hands and turned to Mrs. Dunbar. “Come on,” she said. “Hurry up.”Mr. Dunbar had small stones in both hands, and she said. gasping for breath. “I can’t run at all. You’ll have to go ahead and I’ll catch up with you.”The children had stones already. And someone gave little Davy Hutchinson few pebbles.Tessie Hutchinson was in the center of a cleared space by now, and she held her hands out desperately as the villagers moved in on her. “It isn’t fair,” she said. A stone hit her on the side of the head. Old Man Warner was saying, “Come on, come on, everyone.” Steve Adams was in the front of the crowd of villagers, with Mrs. Graves beside him.”It isn’t fair, it isn’t right,” Mrs. Hutchinson screamed, and then they were upon her”.

        • Actually no one was thrown under the bus. It’s hard to call a few individuals who have refused to participate in studies designed to address the issues they claim exist and who have chosen to work with lawyers rather than commit to any sort of meaningful community engagement.  How can one justify their immediate run to litigate and their persistent misinformation campaign, causing continued hardships on the  working population of our  island communities?

          • Patten_Pete

            Perhaps they are rightfully fearful of a mob mentality and the readily available supply of stones on the island. 

          • Stop. Your insinuations of mob mentality is disgusting and has no place. Maybe start with actually encouraging these few individuals who seem to have enough money to pay for a frivolous legal battle, to come talk to their neighbors and come talk to the Coop. Enter into a productive dialogue. Leave the lawyers, the fuzzy math and the misleading narrative at home and speak truthfully. 

          • Patten_Pete

            Actually, I am not the grand master of purveying falsehoods.
            Time to perhaps get off your high unicorn?

          • Do you have something factual to say? Do you understand that actual lives depend on these choices of whether we continue with the old way of drill baby drill or if we embrace what a majority of Mainers have, and encourage more, spin baby spin? This isn’t just an abstract thing. Communities are under attack from people like you who will do anything to distort the facts.

        • Guest

          Give credit:  Shirley Jackson

    • Anonymous

      Want to hear a real, scarey noise?  Live near a Nuke when the alarm sirens go off!  Been there..Done that!  It’s even more scarey when you are a volunteer fireman and you find the plan is for you to direct evacuations and stick around to monitor fallout, knowing the plan includes you as an acceptable casualty.  Nope!  Those wind turbines can make all the noise they want.  Even in my backyard. 

  • What a great story. We can all learn from the many benefits of wind power demonstrated in projects across the State. We should continue to invest in a future based on a clean energy economy that keeps jobs in Maine and reduces the environmental impact on our planet of old, expensive, fossil fuels. 

    • Anonymous

      So let me follow up on FIW’s (Fox Island Wind)statement above and ask just how many Maine people are “employed” running this turbine?  100?  50?  Surely 20?  None?  No full time employment came from this project?  Sounds just like the rest of the wind projects around the state.  The turbine at UMPI might be the exception – it’s broken down so much of the time that it no doubt must employ at least one full time maintenance person. 

      And you call fossil fuels expensive?  I just read an article in the Globe this a.m. where a utility in Mass. was just forced by Duvall Patrick’s administration to purchase 27% of the production from the yet to be built Cape Wind projection off of Cape Cod.  That utility is currently paying 8 cents a kilowatt. The contract to buy the wind generated power is almost 19 cents per killowatt, AND there’s an automatic increase clause that gives them another 3.5 cent increase every year for the 15 year period of the contract, which will bring the end cost to 30 cents per kilowatt.  Yup, that wind power sure is cheap!

      • Come out to the Fox Islands and visit us. Talk to over 98% of the community who are strongly supportive of wind power because it has resulted in significant reductions in monthly bills and a project that has exceeded projections in terms of power production and savings. Would you rather send your money to out of state (or out of country) producers of power? In Maine, even in small steps at the school in Camden (let alone the educational benefits it brings), we are showing we can make a difference. Enough of the naysayers who just want to keep on with the old of drill baby drill. SPIN BABY SPIN!

        • Anonymous

          The 100% of islanders who are paying MORE  for their electricity since the wind turbines were installed are not happy with the INCREASE  in their electric bills . FIW promised islanders that the energy rate would be about 6 cents a KWH. Even if one includes the 1 cent a KWH that is going towards FIW’s lawyer bills in their fight with the DEP,  islanders are paying almost DOUBLE what FIW promised. If you are under the illusion that electric bills are lower, you should visit the island and talk to some of your old neighbors who are footing the bill.  They are definitely getting an “education” in the cost of wind energy.

          • Actually, you’re incorrect and your understanding of the bills on the island are just more of the same misinformation campaign waged by 5 or 6 individuals who have sued our community. Come out and talk to us.  Talk to the 98% of Fox Islanders who are strongly supportive of our wind project and who are enthusiastic about the savings they see every month when the rate bill arrive in the mail. Gone are the days of unreliable, expensive power. Gone are the days of relying on a power source that is not local and that is based on fossil fuels. One thing you also seem to forget, is as the price impact of natural gas discoveries balances out and the price of energy continues to rise, our wind energy will be even MORE economical. This is about the LONG TERM. Doing the right thing to keep money here in our communities in Maine, to bring economic benefits to our town and to do our part to move away from a dependence on fossil fuels.

          • Anonymous

            How long to the turbines last before they need replacement? 

          • Anonymous

            In the long term, those GE 1.5’s are JUNK!..In 5 years, your operational economics will deteriorate, in ten, you will be  thinking about the salvage value of the stuff. In twenty years, break out the acetyline torches and salvage the junk for a few boats in the lobster fleet.
            Then , you will finally get something useful from these Chinese hulks.

          • But you’ll never acknowledge the FACTS that wind power works and is good for Maine’s future. Not today, not tomorrow, not in 10 years. 

          • Patten_Pete

            Google “people who cannot admit they are wrong”.

            You might learn some interesting things about yourself.

          • Patten_Pete, Come out a visit us. You’ll be surprised what you might learn. That is if you can come to this conversation with an open mind…

          • Patten_Pete, Come out and visit us. You’ll be surprised what you might learn. That is if you can come to this conversation with an open mind…

          • Anonymous

            Thats because wind power is not economically feasible or reliable today (not a wisp of a breeze as I write), will not be economically feasible or reliable tomorrow or 10 years from now.  It is physics-challenged science and supported by bad public policy.

            Since comments are closed, I reply to Friends of FIW via this edit. There is NO wind project anywhere in this state that makes economic sense. Less than 25% capacity factor and unpredictable, unreliable intermittancy never pays back the huge capital costs of wind. When the PTC goes away and the REC market remains depressed, these things will struggle even worse financially. Take away the heinous mandates of RPS and they shut down. They cannot compete. The electricity costs is lower because the cost-effective gas generation has driven it down. It is reliable because all of the base load and base load following generation comes from predictable, reliable, energy-dense sources, something wind will never be. Should we integrate wind more into the ISO, costs will rise and wind will still be shunted off to surplus planning and never base.

            Instead of posing stupid asinine questions, try putting some real facts out there, like going to FERC website and reporting that the new Rollins project is rated at 17% capacity factor for the ISO based on its miserable 4th quarter 2011 performance.

          • Blueeyes, than why is it making economic sense at projects across the state? Why is our light bill lower and our power more reliable?

        • Anonymous

          More like …. Blow baby Blow!  Just like all the hot air mis-information FIW continues to try to foist on all of us.  Your 98% supportive statement is also full of hot air …oh, I guess you mean AFTER the turbine noise drove those that could no longer live in their homes from the island. You continue to be proud that you forced some families from their homes and off the island so you could save a few bucks on your power bill (and even that hasn’t turned out to be true). Like I’ve always said, with neighbors like you, who needs enemies!

          • Are you referring to the 1 household that sold during the permitting process of the project and the other 2 individuals who moved out to retire on the island and refused to work with our community and rejected several opportunities to participate in studies designed to address the issues they brought up, and instead immediately initiated the law suit that has cost our community over $500k! What about the many households who live CLOSER to the turbines, who continue to support our wind project cause they understand what is at stake and who can’t seem to understand what the issue is with the noise. What about the hundreds of families that depend on our island for their livelihood, who work out here and have raised families, understanding over many generations the struggle of trying to make ends meet. Good neighbors are those that work together towards a common good, who put the interest of the community ahead of their self interest, who help each other out and when faced with a problem, do everything to speak honestly and to act in ways that don’t disparage our community. 

          • Patten_Pete

            Do you mean Chellie Pingree and Donald Sussman on sister island North Haven when you talk about Fox Island Wind supporters who are suffering?

          • Anonymous

            If you knew half of what you proclaim to know you’d be well aware that closeness to the turbines isn’t the sole  criteria that determines the effect by them on a home. Generally speaking, you can stand underneath a turbine and not hear 25% of the noise you can at 1/2 – 1  1/2 miles away under a lot of different conditions. 

            How’s the projected big savings working out for you? 

            And don’t lecture me about good neighbors …. you certainly don’t fit the criteria for most of us.  You’re defintion of good neighbors apparently is those who will suffer the health effects of the noise created by these turbines and just sit there and not complain or take legal action to try to resolve the problem.  All so  you can save a  couple dollars on your electric bill – which hasn’t turned out to be true either …has it!

            You’ve been on here for a couple years now trying to justify your immoral actions.   Take a hike.  Oh, that’s right, the experience of walking and hiking around the island has also been ruined by the noise of these three turbines.  What are you going to do after all the curiosity seekers stop coming to see the turbines and you’re left with no tourism business.  Then who’ll be crying?

          • Health effects? Give us a break! Come visit the neighbors who live up and down the road within the 1/2 mile area. You’ll find an overwhelming majority of them to be supportive of the wind turbines and who are so tired of a litigation effort waged by 2 or 3 households who don’t depend on the island community for their livelihood, who have deep pockets and could care less about the impact of a protracted lawsuit on the residents of both islands. Savings? I take it that you aren’t a rate payer but if you actually talk to them, you’d realize people every month are seeing savings and this will only continue in the future. Good neighbors are about doing whats good for the community and above all, resisting making statements that are false and taking actions that jeopardize the well being of the whole. When we have an issue out her, we work together, as families, as friends, as peers, as neighbors. Its what ingrained in what it means to live in a small island community. 

          • Anonymous

            You’ve been singing that same song on here for several years now.  Earlier today you stated that there was only one family against the turbines, now you say 2-3.  What’s the real number?   You apparently can’t even keep your story straight over the course of your comments on one artcle.  You can keep trying to convince yourselves that you did the right thing, but it isn’t going to change the fact that you have no moral fabric and don’t give two cents about those families that were forced out of their homes.  End of conversation.

          • We said that there was 1 family who sold their house before the project went online, and that there are 2-3 families who are actively organizing a legal suit and misinformation campaign against our communities (all of whom have never worked out here and who do not live out here full time).  As someone who lives on the North Haven Road, within 1/2 mile, I can tell you that the number of sympathizers is less than 2% of the population of both islands, while 98% enthusiastically support the project. And again, who was forced out of their home besides the 1 family that left?  Maybe they wouldn’t have left if they had chosen to work with their neighbors instead of chosen a path of litigation and a PR campaign full of falsehoods, character attacks and fear.

          • Patten_Pete

            How are the folks who hide all the dead birds under the turbines doing?

          • More misinformation. Please stop.

          • Patten_Pete

            Tell that to the personnel on the ferry.

          • Huh? Patten_Pete, you continue to degrade our community and insinuate false narratives. You don’t live out here, you don’t know the facts on FIW or it seems wind energy in Maine, please find another issue to discuss that you know and can have some credibility on.

          • Patten_Pete

            You don’t know anything about me.

          • Patten_Pete

            Spin Baby Spin.

            All you want. But you are losing.

          • No. The State stands to lose because of naysayers like you and the small handful of people who continue to wage legal suits, pursue ineffective misinformation campaigns, and refuse to listen to the majority of Mainers who want to see our state invest in wind energy as part of our energy portfolio.  

          • Spin Baby Spin is working for many communities across Maine and will only continue to work as we look to off-shore wind.  Its time for you to accept the inevitable and not continue to fight change that most of your neighbors want. 

          • Patten_Pete

            Not sure if you’ve been following developments with regard to the Production Tax Credit, but it’s history. Without this money, wind power dies like a vampire deprived of blood.

            And you are being defeated across this country, even though the media has largely been in the tank for you. As America becomes more and more conservative and as conservative reporting flourishes, the sunlight will finish off what’s left of the vampires. Your zombies will hopefully awaken and learn from having been taken.

          • When will you stop with your lies. We are tired of it. Mainers expect better. Get a different hobby. One that actually has a positive consequence and not one that deprives us of a better future, all because you like to be a naysayer. Come visit us. We’re serious.

          • Patten_Pete

            Lies?

            Are the following lies I suppose?

            Senate wind-power supporters rejected for a fourth time 
            http://www.chieftain.com/news/region/wind-tax-credit-bites-dust-again/article_8e2cdaa2-7a33-11e1-a6d6-001a4bcf887a.html 

            Maine Superior Court agrees with wind turbine farm neighbors on Vinalhaven
            http://fiwn.wordpress.com/ 

            Wind power will drive up power costs: Report 
            http://www.torontosun.com/2012/03/19/wind-power-will-drive-up-power-costs-report 

            Poll: Alternative energy loses support
            http://www.upi.com/Business_News/2012/03/20/Poll-Alternative-energy-loses-support/UPI-21181332217270/ 

          • More cherry picked info. Come out a visit a project in operation. Talk to the neighbors. You’ll be surprised.  Is our bill cheaper than before we put up the project? Yes. Has power production met projections? Yes, we’ve exceeded projections. Are we being sued by a handful of individuals who refuse to work with their neighbors in the community? Unfortunately yes.

          • Patten_Pete

            I talked about the Production Tax Credit and you called that a lie. So I sent a link backing up my statement and you call that cherry-picked. It must be a miserable life when you are constitutionally unable to admit when you are wrong. You have been defeated.

          • Why do we continue to pay less in our rate bills and why does production continue to exceed projections? Stop with the fuzzy math. This conversation deserves more honesty and respect for working communities across our state.

    • Anonymous

      Yes, you could do all that. OR BETTER STILL – face reality that the Vinalhaveners bet on a loser. Three of them in fact.

      Decision by Maine Superior Court pleases wind turbine farm neighbors on Vinalhaven
      http://www.windtaskforce.org/profiles/blogs/breaking-news-decision-by-maine-superior-court-pleases-wind-turbi 

  • Anonymous

    Here’s an even better Maine wind power story – from a couple days ago!

    Meeting land-based wind goals not likely

    http://pinetreewatchdog.org/2012/03/29/meeting-land-based-wind-goals-not-likely-say-two-state-studies/?ref=ptwBox

  • Anonymous

    I have seen part of the  MPBN film, “Winds of Change” where on Vinylhaven the cost of electricity has dropped to about half of what it was before their wind turbines were put up.  The question is then, how can Vinylhaven be experiencing such a drop in their electric costs while a turbine such as this will take at a minumum 27 years to pay for itself (based on what is stated in the article)?  Is it because Vinylhaven is a better site for wind (i. e. higher windspeed?), or perhaps tower height – or both?  Or are some huge subsidies masking what would be higher costs?  (I would have a hard time believing that, but still – it must be asked!)

    • Anonymous

      MPBN, which receives large revenues from the wind industry, tells you the cost of electricity on Vinalhaven has dropped to about half.

      The short answer is that the film is wrong.  If you look at the graph of island rates that is posted on the Martha50 thread in these comments, you will see that in fact the rates have gone UP since the turbines were put in.  The long answer is that rates have gone up because natural gas prices have dropped and Vinalhaven can not sell their extra electricity at the price they anticipated. It also appears the market for renewable energy credits has dropped precipitously which is money that FIW also planned on getting. When the president of  FIEC was asked why the energy prices were so high, he replied that he didn’t know!   FIW did not leave themselves a margin for error in their financial model or in their noise model for that matter. This project is an example of what can go wrong with a poorly planned project.

  • Anonymous

    I have seen part of the  MPBN film, “Winds of Change” where on Vinylhaven the cost of electricity has dropped to about half of what it was before their wind turbines were put up.  The question is then, how can Vinylhaven be experiencing such a drop in their electric costs while a turbine such as this will take at a minumum 27 years to pay for itself (based on what is stated in the article)?  Is it because Vinylhaven is a better site for wind (i. e. higher windspeed?), or perhaps tower height – or both?  Or are some huge subsidies masking what would be higher costs?  (I would have a hard time believing that, but still – it must be asked!)

    • Anonymous

      The “Winds of Change” is a PR movie promoted by the Island Institute to save face for a failed project.  Here are the Vinalhaven electric rates over the past two years.  You can see for yourself that rates have gone UP!  
      http://fiwn.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/fiec-rate-graph1.jpg

      • Guest

        “The Island Institute.”  Pretty name.  “Working Waterfront.”  Sounds supportive.  I have no idea what the Island Institute’s agenda is, (solely it’s own, I expect), but, here, too, people, especially those who do not live here and work here, really need to examine this bit of Maine mythology lyricism.

        • Anonymous

          Working Waterfront has no means of commenting on line as a way of censoring any criticisms.  They never publish critical Letters, either, to maintain their propaganda agenda.  It is sad that Island Institute, which has done much good, has so stubbornly stayed with its push for feckless wind power.  But NRCM and Maine Audubon, which should both condemn the blasting away and leveling of Maine’s uplands for wind sites, march to the same tune as Island Institute:  don’t bite the financial hand that feeds you $$$ from the wind industry and its supporters.

      • Please stop misinforming the public. If you want to learn more about FIW, come out and visit us. Come talk to the Coop or any business on Main Street. Ask them what they think of our wind project and what they have paid in the past for energy and how it was forcing many families off island who had called this place home. These graphs are cherry picked pieces of information that don’t show the entire picture of the costs we used to pay, and the average cost over a 5, 10 year period.

        • Patten_Pete

          Those facts that you don’t like seeing published are stubborn things, eh?

    • There are a lot of variables at play. It has a lot to do with the existing economics and what islanders were paying with respect to power, the cost of delivering the power and maintaining a cable under the ocean, the debt incurred to the cable etc…Also the wind turbines on the islands are scaled and sited appropriately to produce about as much power over the course of a year that the communities of both islands consume.  

      • Anonymous

        “There are a lot of variables at play.”  Right you are!  The greatest variable at play is poor planning by FIW’s CEO, George Baker, who in his arrogance chose not to listen to the advice of the DEP sound consultants who recommended that he plan with a 5 dBA margin of error in case his sound model was wrong.  He also left no wiggle room in his financial plan for ratepayers… the investors’ tax saving money is safe with the agreement that the Coop has to buy electricity from FIW, now at a higher rate  than the Coop could get it on the mainland.  Once again, the ratepayers are left holding the bag!  It is all right here: 
        http://fiwn.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/fiec-rate-graph1.jpg    These are not cherry picked numbers, they are month by month charges for the past two years.  Read it and weep.  Islanders were taken to the cleaners.  BTW, the DOE (department of energy) predicts that due to new gas discoveries in the US, the price of electricity will be going DOWN in the long term.  Give it up, Friends of Fox Islands Wind.  These are the realities no matter how much you wish it weren’t so.

        • Again, you mislead, discredit and now you go on a character attack of someone who isn’t even rate payer. The over 1,900 rate payers of FIEC control and collectively own the wind project, and with great deliberation, made the decision to build an effectively scaled wind project. What do you have to say to the many hundred of ratepayers who continue to see savings each month in their rate bills who as the price of energy increases will have satisfaction that they made the right decision to secure long term price stability and access to a reliable, clean source of power?  What do you have to say for the unnecessary, frivolous lawsuit that is a huge burden to both our communities? What do you have to say for the fact that FIWN continues to lie publicly and refuses to work with residents of both islands?  Please stop distorting the record. Come out and visit us. You’ll be surprised by the realities of life on the island where we value truth over fear-mongering, and working together instead of suing your neighbor!

          • Anonymous

            What do I have to say?  Those islanders who see savings on their electric bills  need glasses or some help with the math.  Rates have gone UP! The graph is made up of numbers from FIEC. Nothing fuzzy about that other than your twisted, angry attitude.  Do not insult the islanders intelligence by suggesting that they are not aware of this fact.   They are.  As for the rest of it, I have nothing to say to YOU, the ultimate truth distorter extraordinaire and self-appointed and NOT wanted spokesperson for FIW and FIEC!   Take an anger management class.

          • Tell that to the hundreds of ratepayers who depend on the island for their livelihood. We work here. We need to save money. We have saved money. FIW is a success. Please stop with your spinning of the facts to try to discredit a successful story. My elderly mother who lives off a fixed income can now afford to pay her light bill. She’s not choosing between her food and medical budget. For her sake and the sake of so many islanders, please stop with your fuzzy math. 

          • Betty

            I would hope that being off the island for so long, AB, and getting a college education would have been beneficial to you.  I always have hope that there is a chance for everyone.  Education should offer you the opportunity to have an open mind, to question what you hear and if there is any question you can do your own research to find out your own truth. And certainly to realize the sanctity of free speech and the right to have an opinion.  
            I hope that my belief that an education can be beneficial for everyone is not overthrown by your continuing repetition of sound bites from FIW and FIWN, in spite of the evidence that things might be actually different than what you have heard.  Do your  research and find out for yourself what the truth is.  I have heard  so many sound bites from you from FIW that it makes me question my hope.
            FIWN facts suggest something other than you seem to continually repeat.  So I hope you can rise to the intellectual challenge of finding out the facts before you continue your regurgitation of sound bites.  A good place to start is on FIWN.org because all those facts are documented by references to provable sources.  They are not “lies” as you suggest.  If you are such a proponent of communication, reach out and talk to those neighbors who you say have refused to talk.  That might offer a different perspective.  They are real people, just like you, who are trying to do the right thing. Take a few minutes, take a deep breath, and consider for one minute that everything you may have heard is not right.
            They are willing to talk as they always have, before FIW and FIEC placed a communications embargo on them, justified on the basis of a legal battle that in fact was never, and still is not there. You seem to be smart and well spoken. Do everyone a favor and do some research before you repeat the same old stuff.  Be an individual and make statements that are well researched and documented before you speak.
            I frankly do not understand why you are so emotionally attached to this issues, since you live off island and while you dad lives nearby, you do not.
            I truly believe that once you have opened up to the facts on the ground, you might actually become a supporter of FIWN rather than supporting a losing cause.
            Best of luck in entering the society 0f educated adults.

          • This is not AB, but a group of individuals who live on the North Haven Road  and who judging by your comments are YOUR neighbors when you are out here seasonally on the island. We all have called the island home, some for 5-6 generations and we depend on it for our employment, where our kids and grandkids go to school. Please stop misinforming the public about our wind project and please stop your frivolous lawsuit. Its anti-community. Why don’t you try to talk to your neighbors and work towards a fact finding effort? You claim that the Coop refuses to talk to you. That’s a lie! You claim that the project hasn’t saved us money? That’s another lie. What do you have to gain by attacking us islanders? Is it just an ego trip? Is it because you have nothing better to do, while we struggle to make ends meet and survive out here? FIWN is so full of misleading graphs and statements, its hard to know where to start. Anyone who wants to learn the facts, come to our neighborhood. Talk to people on Main St about their views and how much they’ve saved since the project went online. Talk to some who remember clearly the days where power was incredibly expensive and unreliable out here or when we had a diesel generator plant going non-stop and people could hear it all over town. Maybe walk a day or better yet, year in the life  of a working family on the island and see what you think? You’d probably realize the noise isn’t an issue as instead of trying to hear the turbines, you’d be spending the day working.  And please, please stop your continued attack on our island residents. We’ve always been friendly to you, and help out in a pinch. Just come back to reality and commit to honesty and stop spreading the negative lies of FIWN. Enough is enough!

          • What’s most shocking of your statement, is not only the continued denial of the facts (i.e. embargo on FIWN ) is that you continue to claim that you aren’t involved in a law suit. That is a COMPLETE LIE. Not only do people on both islands know this to be true, the rest of the state knows it to be true. You’ve threatened to litigate from day one, before making an effort to try to work with your neighbors and now that you have retained Rufus Brown and have time after time proceeded with legal complaint and suit, you still say you’re not involved in litigation. This is outrageous. Its time you at least come clean and own up to the very fact that everyone who has been following this story knows, that FIWN has a lawyer and is suing the communities of the Fox Islands! How can we possibly communicate if you’re unwilling to acknowledge the simple facts!?

          • Patten_Pete

            I remember reading awhile back an article by a Vinalhavener (I think his last name was Webster) ranting about sea level rise and bemoaning the fact that Vinalhaven did not put up SIX turbines instead of three. The poor misled lied-to islanders would have really been losing money on their electric bills if six had gone up. What makes these zealots tick? I know one thing, arrogant elitists will NEVER admit how easily outwitted they are by the unwashed commoners they disdain.

          • Do you get a rate bill? I don’t think you do because you would realize as the hundreds of rate payers of the benefits that we have ALREADY seen. Gone are the days of expensive, volatile, unreliable power. Do your self a favor and at the very least speak honestly. Us islanders simply request that you stop spreading misinformation and lies.

          • Patten_Pete

            Lies? I don’t think so.

            A bit touchy I guess. The Webster reference seems to have resonated.

          • We would be saving even MORE money and producing even greater benefits if we had 6 turbines. Though, we are happy with the size of the project we built. FIW was sited appropriately, after careful deliberation and community input, and scaled accurately, considering the annual production basically matches the total annual energy usage of both seasonal and year-round residents. These 3 turbines have brought down the bills of EVERY single ratepayer and thus put more money back in the pockets of islanders, many who live check to check or haul to haul.

          • Patten_Pete

            Your population is like four times bigger in the summer. So does your deal structurally fleece them as they are not around most of the year to reap the “benefits”?

          • Actually, no. If you care about the facts, come visit us.

          • And given the success of the 3 turbines, we agree, maybe we should have put up 6 and only increased the savings residents of both islands have seen within 3 years of the project being operational. Maybe if the 2 or 3 seasonal families who are litigating got some sense and realized how much FIW is positively impacting the working people of both islands and those on fixed incomes etc, they would realize that no one gains by suing our community. Recognize the obvious that the existing project is working well and be a good neighbor and stop with the misinformation.

  • Anonymous

    Short term vs. long term comparisons need to be looked at here. The students created a demonstration project that will provide data collection for analysis of costs and benefits of this future, long term technology as it and other technologies will be required to replace the short term energy resource we know as fossil fuels.

    Our modern calendar dates to 2012 years ago and coal and oil are present as energy resources for but a fraction of that. Think ahead another 2012 years and ask whether oil or coal will be available at any price, let alone the cheap price being paid now.

    All costs are relative to supply and demand, as a rule. Government efforts to push this technology and others and forcing ratepayers to support it above market rates does seem intrusive. But is it avoidable? When supplies dwindle the price will rise and if they are cut off costs will not be so different. Wind is a local renewable power source and the students have placed a long term bet on a future that will have much different energy supply picture than today. 

    Give them credit for thinking ahead. America is so used to cheap energy we fail to grasp that the price pressure on future conventional energy resources will be a shock to our system. We really can’t afford to wait until oil and coal are completely gone before we turn to renewable resources, even if that day is 100 years from now.

  • I hope someone shows these children WINDFALL.

  • Anonymous

    Shows what can be accomplished when people work together. Great news. May we all learn a lesson from this project so we can move forward as a state, as a country and as a world. “It takes a village” :)

    • Anonymous

      Lets move “forward”, and shelve the “technology” until it is economically viable and less environmentally damaging, thank you.
      For now, enjoy your toy, at taxpayer expense.

  • Anonymous

    The students are to be heartily commended for their perseverance, tenacity and initiative.  Not being completely familiar with their work over the years, I am a little puzzled by the apparent economics of the project, though.  All else being equal, it appears the break even point is more than 27 years away, assuming zero maintenance expenses.  I’m guessing the turbine would possibly have to be replaced before then.  I’d be interested to see what their figures show.  I understand that the turbine was essentially donated, but that’s probably not something that can be readily duplicated too many times.

    If a school had to pay for the turbine and associated construction expenses, it really wouldn’t be saving anything on its electric bills, would it?  Wouldn’t the bills be effectively higher?   Just a thought.

  • Anonymous

    The students and teachers of Camden Hills Regional High School deserve  great respect for doing “something .” They have accomplished many things. They have done themselves, their parents, their school system, and their communities proud.  This  fulfilling project is in happy contrast to the multitudes who have all the answers, about,  but no solutions  to, the  troubles that beset our country.  Don’t allow yourselves to be conned into settling for anything but the best.  Forget the rest. Aim high.

  • Betty

    Thank  you Heather, author of the article, for doing the follow-up research, and changing the article content to reflect that the people on Vinalhaven are not actually saving money.  I guess you have to always be open minded and realize that even the folks at the Island Institute may say things that have more to do with their own agenda than the actual facts.

  • Patten_Pete

    “As part of the Global Science Curriculum all students are now required to design and build a wind machine”
    Source: http://www.fivetowns.net/subsites/windplanners/ourProject.html

    See the Powerpoint download at:
    http://www.fivetowns.net/subsites/windplanners/ourPresentations.html

    …for how they raised funds,e.g., Stephen and Tabitha King. (Since the attached was only part way through the fundraising, it’s not possible to say what other fundraising sources may have been involved – from the attached). Note also that a $200,000 from an “anonymous donor” is referred to in the following as a “$200,000 matching grant”.
    http://www.fivetowns.net/subsites/windplanners/pressreleases/bangor.pdf

    Note the following article talks about a grant from Efficiency Maine:
    “The project needs to be completed by March 30 or we lose a $50,000 Efficiency Maine grant,” Rose said. “[Efficiency Maine has] already given us an extension.”
    http://bangordailynews.com/2011/12/01/news/midcoast/panel-nervous-about-potential-noise-with-proposed-rockport-high-school-wind-turbine/

    Also note that the University of Mass at Amherst was involved, installing a 140′ met tower along the way.http://www.fivetowns.net/subsites/windplanners/ourProject.html

    Meanwhile, one of the faculty members involved with steering this project is a former “Maine Environmental Educator of the Year”. Is there a similar award if and when the turbine fails?

    Margo Murphy serendipitously discovered teaching and has taught for the last 18 years at Georges Valley HS, in a small Midcoast Maine community. She has been very active in facilitating and leading a dedicated group of k-12 science teachers in her district. …Her awards include Presidential Awardee in secondary science in 1994, Maine Environmental Educator of the Year 1996, and Maine Conservation Educator of the Year 2002.

    http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/MMurphy_Bio_HS_Labs_Mtg_7_12_04.html

  • Anonymous

    I still remember the lavish greenhouse, err, conservatory, integrated into the new high school by an equally enthused group of students, parents and teachers. We would learn organic farming, understand the impact of climate change, ecology, blah, blah, blah.

    Time goes on, students graduate, teachers leave, parents move and the Greenhouse becomes an untended eyesore, filled with diseased plants and weeds.  Operational maintenance and daily care was never programmed into the building, of course.

    In time the new wind turbine will need some expensive repairs, or get frozen or hit by a sea gull, or need to be climbed to oil some components and now it is ‘work’ someone has to get paid to do.

    Will it be abandoned like the greenhouse and parts of new public schools that were never fully integrated into the curriculum?  ….or some weekend in the summer, taken down and sold on eBAY? 

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