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Comments for: 42-megawatt industrial wind site proposed for Passadumkeag Mountain

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  • Anonymous

    Great news – let’s keep these clean energy sources coming!

    • Anonymous

      I don’t always agree with you Bangorian, but you are spot on with this one!

    • Anonymous

       Agreed, but would like to see some new hydroelectric dams too.

    • Anonymous

       You are right. I think at least one maybe two would look good next to the Thomas Hill Standpipe in Bangor, maybe a couple out on Essex street standpipes.

      • Anonymous

         I would love to see a windmill in town. 

        • MaineHiker

           MARCH 15, 2012

          5

          400,000 Dead Birds a Year and Counting

          The Wind Industry’s License to Kill

          by ROBERT BRYCE

          In 2009, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimated that the domestic wind turbines are killing about 440,000 birds per year. Since then, the wind industry has been riding a rapid growth spurt.

          But that growth has slowed dramatically due to a tsunami of cheap natural gas
          and hefty taxpayer subsidies. Even worse: that cheap gas looks like it
          will last for many years and Congress has been unwilling to extend the
          2.2 cents per kilowatt-hour subsidy for wind operators that expires at
          the end of this year.

          And now, the wind industry is facing yet another massive headache:
          increasing resistance from environmental groups who are concerned about
          the effect that unrestrained construction of wind turbines is having on
          birds and bats. Ninety environmental groups, led by the American Bird
          Conservancy, have signed onto the “bird-smart wind petition” which has
          been submitted to the Fish and Wildlife Service.

          It’s about time. Over the past two decades, the federal government
          has prosecuted hundreds of cases against oil and gas producers and
          electricity producers for violating some of America’s oldest
          wildlife-protection laws: the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and Eagle
          Protection Act. But the Obama administration — like the Bush
          administration before it — has never prosecuted the wind industry
          despite myriad examples of widespread, unpermitted bird kills by
          turbines. A violation of either law can result in a fine of $250,000
          and/or imprisonment for two years.

          But amidst all the hoopla about “clean energy” the wind industry is
          being allowed to continue its illegal slaughter of some of America’s
          most precious wildlife. Even more perverse: taxpayers — thanks to
          billions of dollars given to the wind industry through the production
          tax credit and federal stimulus package — are subsidizing that
          slaughter.

          Last June, Louis Sahagun, a reporter with the Los Angeles Times,
          reported that about 70 golden eagles per year are being killed by the
          wind turbines at Altamont Pass, located about 20 miles east of Oakland. A
          2008 study funded by the Alameda County Community Development Agency
          estimated that about 2,400 raptors, including burrowing owls, American
          kestrels, and red-tailed hawks — as well as about 7,500 other birds,
          nearly all of which are protected under the Migratory Bird Treat Act —
          are being killed every year by the turbines at Altamont.

          A pernicious double standard is at work here and it riles Eric
          Glitzenstein, a Washington, D.C.-based lawyer who wrote the petition to
          the Fish and Wildlife Service for the American Bird Conservancy. He told
          me, “It’s absolutely clear that there’s been a mandate from the top”
          echelons of the federal government not to prosecute the wind industry
          for violating wildlife laws.

          Glitzenstein comes to this issue from the Left. Before forming his own law firm,
          he worked for Public Citizen, an organization created by Ralph Nader.
          But when it comes to wind energy, “Many environmental groups have been
          claiming that too few people are paying attention to the science of
          climate change, but some of those same groups are ignoring the science
          that shows wind energy’s negative impacts on bird and bat populations.”

          That willful ignorance may be ending. The Center for Biological
          Diversity, Sierra Club, and Defenders of Wildlife recently filed a
          lawsuit against officials in Kern County, California, in an effort to
          block the construction of two proposed wind projects — North Sky River
          and Jawbone — due to concerns about their impact on local bird
          populations. The groups oppose the projects because of their proximity
          to the deadly Pine Tree facility, which the Fish and Wildlife Service
          believes is killing 1,595 birds, or about 12 birds per megawatt of
          installed capacity, per year.

          The only time a public entity has pressured the wind industry for
          killing birds occurred in 2010, when California brokered a $2.5 million
          settlement with NextEra Energy Resources for bird kills at Altamont. The
          lawyer on that case: former attorney general and current Gov. Jerry
          Brown, who’s now pushing the Golden State to get 33 percent of its
          electricity from renewables by 2020.

          Despite the toll that wind turbines are taking on wildlife, the wind
          industry wants to keep its get-out-of-jail-free card. Last May, the Fish
          and Wildlife Service proposed new guidelines for wind turbine
          installations. The American Wind Energy Association has responded by
          calling the proposed rules “unworkable” and “extremely problematic.”

          Given that many billions of dollars are at stake, it’s not surprising
          that the wind industry is eager to downplay its effect on wildlife. And
          while much of the focus has been on birds, bats are getting whacked,
          too. Last July, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that the
          420 wind turbines that have been erected in Pennsylvania “killed more
          than 10,000 bats last year…That’s an average of 25 bats per turbine per
          year, and the Nature Conservancy predicts that as many as 2,900 turbines
          will be set up across the state by 2030.” A coalition of environmental
          groups have mobilized to fight the proposed Shaffer Mountain wind
          project in Pennsylvania because of its possible effect on the endangered
          Indiana bat.

          Last November, that coalition – which includes Allegheny Plateau
          Audubon Society, the Allegheny Front Hawk Watch, Sensible Wind
          Solutions, the Mountain Laurel Chapter of Trout Unlimited — sent a
          60-day notice of intent to sue the Fish and Wildlife Service for issuing
          an opinion that may allow the Shaffer Mountain project to go forward.
          The letter cited Michael Gannon, a bat expert and professor of biology
          at Penn State University, who said that “there is an unprecedented risk
          to Indiana bats at the Shaffer Mountain project site.” He continued,
          saying the project could “jeopardize the species’ survival and recovery
          efforts.”

          The backlash against the wind industry that’s now coming from the
          Left, has clearly put the Obama administration in a tight spot.
          President Obama has repeatedly said he favors renewable energy. But now,
          even the Sierra Club is saying that mandatory rules are needed for
          proper wind turbine siting.

          Continue reading here.

          Robert Bryce is the author of Power Hungry: The Myths of “Green” Energy and the Real Fuels of the…

        • Anonymous

          Why don’t you volunteer your backyard as a free site for a turbine?  I’m sure you and your neighbors won’t mind all of the blasting that goes on to create the huge cavity that they fill with concrete as a base for the turbine.  And they’ll have to cut down every tree within a couple blocks, but who needs them anyway.  And I’m sure you won’t mind the flashing red lights that reflect off of various surfaces and will light up parts of your and the neighbor’s houses all night.  And certainly your neighbors won’t object to all of the  high and low frequency noise that will keep half of them up night after night until they’re ready to lose their minds.  Then we have that little issue of blade flicker that makes your house appear as if someone is flicking the lights on and off every second or so.  And let’s not forget the large chunks of ice that can be thrown almost a half mile from the turbines blades.  Your neighbors won’t object to these chunks of ice being catapulted through their windows on on top of their cars. 

          Oh, and let’s not forget that if/when your turbine catches fire, as many of them do over their 12-15 year lifespan, there’s no way to fight the fire as we have no equipment capable of getting water 44 stories into the air.

          And last but not least, in about 12 years it will cease to be financially viable from a maintenance cost vs. output production standpoint and you will be left holding the bag for the cost to bring in a specialized crane at $100,000.+ so that you can pay to have it dismantled.  

          On second thought Bangorian, I’m hoping you have a yard large enough to accomodate 2-3 of these turbines.

        • Anonymous

           True, but the normal people in Bangor wouldn’t like it!

    • Anonymous

      Please explain the scientific and economic basis for that statement.  There isn’t one!  Wind power is just a scam.  Just across the valley, the Rollins turbines had only 17% capacity factor (output) in its first full quarter of reporting according to FERC.  That was the 4th quarter of 2011.  We are wasting taxpayers’ money on something that doesn’t work!

      • Anonymous

         Here’s a piece of scientific evidence in support of my statement:  You put up a windmill and it creates electricity without producing a single bit of pollution. 

        • MaineHiker

           The “Clean Energy” bill will not be on the November ballot in Maine
          in 2012 because the required number of signatures could not be mustered.
          I believe this happened because most Mainer’s have come to realize that
          this would not have been a “clean energy” bill at all. Maybe it should
          have been called the “Wind Industry Initiative “bill or the “Clean
          Energy Hoax” bill. However that may be, it is clear that the “clean
          energy bill” is a complete and misleading misnomer.
          Industrial
          wind turbines DO NOT provide clean energy. CO2 is being sequestered all
          the time. It happens wherever water, CO2 and sunshine work in vegetation
          through a process called photosynthesis. This process produces the
          Oxygen we and all other animals need to breathe and live. An industrial
          wind turbine cannot do this. When wind industry front agents say this
          they say they mean that wind turbines do not produce CO2 and the energy
          they produce offsets the CO2 that would be produced by fossil fueled
          electricity generation. They CAN NOT sequester 1 molecule of CO2 and
          produce Oxygen as could as the acres of trees clear cut to make space
          for an industrial wind turbine.
          Industrial wind turbines DO NOT
          provide clean energy. The workings of a turbine is a matter of using the
          wind to move propeller like blades which turns the shaft of a generator
          to produce electricity. The only problem is that this process if
          grossly inefficient. So, engineers worked to develop and more efficient
          generator.  This meant reducing the friction in the system and using
          very powerful magnets to set up a magnetic field in the stator (stable,
          non-rotating) field through which the rotor (rotating coil of wire)
          could move cutting the lines of force of the stator to create electric
          current.
          Researchers discovered that they could make alloys of
          metals that had incredible magnetic properties. Permanent magnet stators
          made using alloys containing the rare Earth called Yttrium provided
          about the most highly effective generators. These magnets are so strong
          that discs of the alloys brought together to repel each other required
          much force and when mounted on a rotor in a generator provided a nearly
          frictionless system for turning a rotor in a stator. But, how do we come
          by the much prized rare earth element?
          This material is not
          actually rare. It was only called that because of the historical
          circumstances that occurred as it was discovered and located in the
          periodic table of the elements. In fact, China is currently the largest
          supplier of the material and almost all countries are exploring its
          mining. The problem is that strip mining for this ore is difficult and
          the pits it is mined from become contaminated with highly toxic
          materials. Strip mining this needed special ore that leaves a lake of
          poisonous chemicals, requires the use of large amounts of diesel fuel
          which, as it is burned, releases large quantities of CO2 into the
          atmosphere.
          Now the needed ores must be processed and refined to
          be used in the manufacture of an industrial wind turbine. These
          processes all require burning fossil fuels and burning large amounts of
          fossil fuels are burned all through the manufacture of these machines.
          This releases more CO2 into the atmosphere. Once manufactured, the
          turbines must be loaded onto ocean vessels and be transported by ocean
          to wherever they are intended to be installed.  These vessels are
          powered by many tons of fossil fuels and release megatons of CO2 into
          the atmosphere.
          Once they arrive at their destination, the
          turbines must be offloaded to heavy duty vehicles which must transport
          them to their installation site. More diesel fuels pump more CO2 into
          the atmosphere. These vehicles require very special roads for the
          delivery operation. The roads must be wide enough to make the turns. The
          roads must be deeply packed and packed hard. They won’t just ride along
          on a logging road. Diesel powered equipment must be used to prepare the
          installment roads and final site and that means creating wide
          hard-packed barriers to small wildlife, compartmentalizing off species
          which need to meet. This is just one of the Hellacious assaults on
          wildlife habitats performed by industrial wind turbines.
          Next they
          must be installed. This is no little feat. The columns to hold the
          turbine can be 400 to 500 feet tall or more. The casing and the turbine
          is many tons and each fiberglass blade on the windmill may weigh over 7
          tons. And the machines huff out even more CO2. So much fossil fuel must
          be burned in this process that, before they ever start turning, each
          industrial wind turbine is responsible for releasing megatons of CO2
          into the atmosphere. Once tested and fully installed the turbine needs
          close maintenance including lubrication with lots and lots of, you know
          what, oil! And if they don’t have the required lubrication they can,
          will, and have burst into flame and throw burning materials out into the
          forests around. Fire fighters are powerless to put them out and must
          tend to fires that reach the ground. Of course this if difficult if they
          are sited on remote forested mountaintops and ridges in the wilderness
          of Maine. Just what is a remote fire warden to do?
          Industrial wind
          turbines provide anything but clean energy and the only renewable part
          of Industrial wind turbine electricity is the expensive tax and
          electricity rates needed to artificially prop-up (subsidize) the
          wind-power industry. 
           

          • Anonymous

            OK, I nominate this one for the “Best of BDN Comments Section.”

          • Anonymous

            Great job, MaineHiker!  We need to stop the wind madness before it is too late. 

            Unfortunately, most people (including some posters here on the BDN site) have the standard knee-jerk reaction: “Oh, it’s green?  In that case, I’m all for it!”

            You, my friend, have done your homework.  Thank you for shedding light on this scam being perpetrated on the good people of our State.

        • Anonymous

          single bit?? how bout the lubrication oil in the turbines? where does the turbine get its electricity when the wind isn’t blowing?

          • Anonymous

            You are so right the lubrication oil in those turbine are likey to cause a big disaster like BP and the Gulf or Exxon Valdez!  Thanks for warning us!!!

          • Anonymous

             No problem….

          • Anonymous

            Obviously, folks, a baseline intelligence level is not necessary to post here. 

        • Anonymous

           wrong.

        • Turbines are made in China, who is choking their people to death with the air pollution, the Vietnamese are building the steel tubing for the towers and you can bet that the steel mill is shooting out more air pollution, and then there is the trip to the site via ocean vessel, truck and huge crane to get them up and our tax dollars are paying for this pollution, It makes me sad that people don’t think beyond their nose.

          • Anonymous

            You forgot the Laotians.

            And Wall Streetians.

        • I’m for windmills – and trying to switch from the traditional energy sources in general …but saying they don’t create pollution isn’t 100 % accurate.

           Windmills are produced from fiberglass and resins (my husband has worked on them and boats) and any fiberglass work is anything but environmental :) Once they are actually manufactured they don’t produce hardly any pollution, in relative terms at least. The only bad thing I could say after post production is if they use a battery bank – batteries are horrible to manufacture as far as pollution goes as well, and they have to be replaced frequently (that would be more for personal windmills though). Still it is the better of two evils and the more we use them, the better we can streamline them to work more efficiently. 

          • Anonymous

            Wind turbines will be more efficient when diesel powered fans blow air into them. As they are, they are inefficient wastes of money which would be better spent on solar panels on rooftops. Of course, that s not conducive to mega corporation windsprawl type schemes, so there is not much interest. Google Baiyun Obo and see the pollution the clean green turbines are causing in China, where they are produced by copious amounts of good old dirty coal!! Think of the oil America could save if cruise ships were abolished and sail cruises were their replacements. I drive a 4 cyl. car, walk or bike to work, and paddle for fun. My carbon footprint is low. How about yourself?

    • Anonymous

      “The company has at least temporarily pulled its application to build a 27-turbine wind farm northwest of Grand Lake Stream on the Penobscot and Washington county line. That withdrawal occurred in November.”
       
      Mr. Sambides, the project that you refer to above has been ongoing for 3+ years, including the Kossith rezoning.  The name of the applicant is Champlain Wind (LLC of First Wind, Boston) and the project’s official name is the Bowers Mt. project.  Too bad you’ve been so busy that you didn’t attend most of the meetings on this project.  Perhaps not only would you have known the project name, but also you might have known that what you said about the applicant withdrawing it’s proposal in Nov. is a complete falsehood. 
       
      They petitioned LURC to allow them to withdraw (after LURC had already voted unanimously to instruct their staff and legal to draft the denial document.  In an overt attempt to circumvent a “denial decision” (which would have been a “first”  in Maine) the applicant asked to withdraw their application.  This was venue shopping and wasting taxpayer dollars at it’s finest.  LURC gave them a “second bite of the apple” by allowing them an additional 90+ days to come back with a precise, detailed plan that would mitigate the commissioners concerns about the location of this project at the headwaters of the Downeast Lakes Watershed, one of the state’s few remaining Class 1A rated watersheds left in the state that you can actually drive to.
       
      Mr. Sambides, you do a great disservice to the 220+ plus members of the Partnership for the Preservation of the Downeast Lakes Watershed who have worked their tails off proving that this was NOT an appropriate site for a industrial wind energy project that would loom 44 stories above the lakes.   These folks have worked their fingers bare opposing this project with very little money but a lot of desire to preserve this rare jewel that is the West Grand Lake watershed.  How about waiting until after the April 6th LURC meeting where the decison on their withdrawal motion is voted on before you declare they were allowed to withdraw back in November.   By the way, the smart money is still on a denial to withdraw, and a denial of the entire project.  That April 6th meeting is right in Lincoln where you live Mr. Sambides, perhaps you can make it to this meeting so that you can report with accuracy.
       
      How about a correction to this article Mr. Sambides?

      • Nick never learned to produce facts when writing his articles. At most they have half truths. I also believe that he reads the Lincoln News and prints their articles almost verbetum 2 to 3 weeks later in the BDN.

      • Anonymous

        I contacted BD numerous times back in Sept on Danforth’s wind ordiance town meeting. Thought they would want to cover the circus. Needless to say, the ordiance passed, and now us on East Grand Lake will be facing a 20 + windfarm 3/4 mile from the shore of the lake. No news media from the BD attended the meeting.

    • Anonymous

      You obviously have not done any research regarding wind power.

      • Anonymous

        That’s the good thing about Bangorian, he doesn’t have to study anything, he’s a self aggrandizing expert on virtually everything.  If you don’t believe it just ask him.

        • Anonymous

          ad hominem.  At best.

    • Anonymous

      How about a nuclear power plant in Bangor?

  • MtbikeME

    Ha-ha right, clean energy, do some research……..

  • Guest

    It wouldn’t surprise me if either Adams or Michaud were involved

    • Anonymous

      You don’t think Mikey would miss a photo op do you???

  • Anonymous

    Do the research and learn the facts.  It’s bad science and unreliable power, and it is anything BUT green. 

    A handful of people are getting filthy rich from government subsidies which support this travesty.  e2346437, you are right on the money.  Hydro dams have much lower impact, the potential energy can be stored (unlike wind), and they provide consistent baseload power (again, unlike wind). 

    Time to classify hydro power as renewable energy once again, and recommission all these dams!

  • Great news if its profitable without tax money.

    • Anonymous

      You are spot on! As long as tax money is not involved. I stopped by one of the Stetson sites last summer, it was about 11 pm on a clear night, I did not find the sound these things make objectionable. But I admit, these are in the middle of nowwhere……

      • Anonymous

        They don’t make sounds when they aren’t turning.

        • MaineHiker

           They make sounds when they are turning.

        • Anonymous

          I don’t know enough about how fast they need to turn to make noise, these were turning but maybe not fast enough…………they sure looked nice in the moonlight, however.

          • MaineHiker

             You may think they look nice in the Moonlight but they’ve scared all the whales out of the mountains.

          • Anonymous

            “Nice in the Moonlight”   Red lights flashing through the moonlight…..nice……not!

    • Anonymous

      I am truly looking forward to that, as well as witnessing pigs flying!  Wind power exists only due to overly huge tax subsidies, Enron-inspired RECs, and heinous mandates.

      • Anonymous

        Take a good look at the subsidies paid to the oil companies, even though they make record profits, they get billions in tax dollars. Now that’s a scam.

        • Anonymous

          You’re right, Just like Fartwind…

        • Anonymous

          Yes, they are both scams, that’s why I say the government should get out of any subsidies, favorable tax treatments, and mandates.  Take it all away, as oil companies don’t need it and wind doesn’t deserve it.  Take away all the subsidies and the impact on oil companies is like me taking a penny from my annual income.  Take away subsidies from wind and it will cease to exist.  Even after 20 years of subsidies, the AWEA, the industry lobby says that the industry can’t survive without the Production Tax Credit.   The problem with creating subsidies is the political will to bring them to an end is always lacking in the face of lobbying from the favored special interest.  With a $15 trillion national debt, it is time to cut all these special interest subsidies.

  • well its great news if you dont have it in your backyard guys

    • Anonymous

      No, these projects are NOT great news in anyone’s back yard as every one of these projects gets 100s of millions of YOUR tax dollars to subsidize it’s contruction and operation and they typically only generate 15-30% of what the developers’ forecast when going through the application process. Just a great big scam to reap billions of taxpayer dollars at the expense of the average citizen.

      • well i was bein a smart a  about what i said i hunt and fish this area its like my therapy is to go there and just ejoy the veiw i hope it never passes we all need to go to this meeting and voice our concerns

        • so this is what is gonna happen, whatever isnt bein  bought up for the “national park”  is gonna be covered in these  ugly windfarms! decisions decisions :(  

  • Anonymous

    Just what we need..More eye sores to gaze at.Oh yeah thats great news!Come to Maine..Where theres wind turbines on every hill…Talk to people who have to look at these things every day.

  • Anonymous

    To all folks in the affected area:
    Take a deep breath. There is lots of help available. A good place to start is http://www.windtaskforce.org/page/i-m-new-what-can-i-do

    It will take you to a listing of a number of local Maine wind groups. A good strategy is to review these sites and contact a group in your area of the state. There is often a good chance that members of that group will be in a good position to give you advice that is most relevant to the area in which you live.

  • rob pforzheimer

    There’s a glut of electric generation in New England and most of the US. We don’t need to be building  more,  especially  inefficient, loud wind projects that will do nothing but drive up rates,  devalue peoples quality of life and property values and kill birds and bats.
    Classify hydro as renewable to satisfy the arbitrary mandates set by the legislature and stop permitting these useless wind projects.

    • Anonymous

      Absolutely right!  Here in Maine we have a half dozen biomass facilities that are mothballed.  One that does operate, the Covanta plant in West Enfield, 20 miles from Passadumkeag Mt., cranks out base load power at 25 MW of reliable, predictable electricity, far more than the fickle trickle of wind power.  In Rumford, there is a 265 MW combined cycle natural gas plant that has capacity to dwarf all the existing and currently planned wind power in Maine, yet it doesn’t run at capacity as base load.  It is a waste of resources and bad economics to continue building sprawling industrial wind sites on our mountain and ruining our state when we are not utilizing existing resources.  We do this to allow the wind thieves to be pigs feasting at the taxpayer subsidy trough.

      • Anonymous

         Mothballed Bio-Mass plants is a shame.
        Port of EASTPORT is getting ready to ship wood chips to Europe
        for use in their Bio-Mass plants there.

        HUH !! ???   Say what ??
        We cant run our Bio-Mass plants but can truck the chips in from all over
        the place , load HUGE ships and send it all the way across the ocean?
        And someone is still making a fortune.

        Perhaps some of the Bio-Mass to send to Europe will come from the clear cuts of the forest
        to build Wind Towers to produce electricity that our idled Bio-Mass plants
        aren’t producing.

        CRAZY or what ??
        I’ll bet Angus Kings sticky fingers are in that pie somewhere along the line.

        You dont hear anyone talking ” Green” about any of this dirty business do you?
        Other than Greenbacks that is.

  • Anonymous

    Please note that the Bowers app, near grand lake stream, was not withdrawn, LURC denied them permission to withdraw. The draft decision has been a denial and there is no reason to think that has changed.

    • Anonymous

      Booksense, the status of Bowers is as follows, very short version of long story. FW requested to withdraw their application. On April 6th LURC will decide whether to let them withdraw. If LURC says no withdrawal, then they will likely deny the permit in May.

    • Anonymous

      You don’t expect a little thing like THE FACTS to get in Mr. Sambides’ way do you?  That project (Bowers Mt.) is about 15 miles from where he lives and he hasn’t a clue about it’s status or anything else.  All he knows is what he reads in the Lincoln News each week.

      But he was real good at being suckered in by First Wind to write an article about the recent PUC hearings and First Wind’s views of that whole pack of lies that they propogated.  He’s easily used when the developer sends him a press release but can’t bother actually attending the Bowers hearings which have all been held right in his backyard in Lincoln.  Probably too busy. 

  • Anonymous

    This was moved to be a response to Bangorian

  • Anonymous

    This is from an official ISO-NE document: 

    “Quantum Utility Generation, LLC.
    Quantum Utility Generation, LLC.
    The Noble Passadumkeag Windpark project requested to be qualified with asummer Qualified Capacity of 10.100 MW in the Maine Load Zone. The overlappingimpact analysis determined that the Orrington South interface would be overloaded afterthe addition of the Noble Passadumkeag Windpark project. The ISO has determined thatthe upgrades associated with the transmission project are unlikely to be completed by thestart of the 2015-2016 Capacity Commitment Period. In addition, the intermittentresource capacity information submitted by the Project Sponsor was insufficient for theISO to confirm the summer and winter Qualified Capacity that the Project Sponsorclaimed for the Intermittent Power Resource.”What this means is a guestimate of 24% capacity factor for something that hasn’t yet been built.  Based on the actual figures on Rollins & Stetson in the same region, this project will never come near that exaggerated figure.  Again, we are destroying beautiful places for an unpredictable, unreliable, and un-needed source of electricity.  Then why is this proposal even going forward when the extension of the Production Tax Credit has been defeated three times in recent weeks in Congress.  This is just a big scam!

  • Anonymous

    I’m going to go out on a limb here and say some folks on this board are not going to like this proposal. I only hope they find the strength to post their views.

  • Anonymous

    White Elephant.

  • Anonymous

    Why does the State of Maine continue to allow greedy wind developers destroy its famous Natural Beauty?

    This project will cause the same environmental damage that is being proposed and already approved by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection to build fifty 500 foot tall wind turbines on forested ridges overlooking pristine wilderness lakes such as Lake Mattawamkeag.

    Who will want to come visit Maine’s famous wilderness lakes and hike its trails when they are all destroyed by 500 foot tall wind turbines?

    What politician in their right mind would allow such environmental damage?

    What Maine citizen would vote for a politician who would allow such environmental?

    This environmental damage is besides that fact that Mainers will have to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to subsidize these wind developers plus pay much higher electric rates for many years to come.

    Maine is not Kansas where wind is reliable.  Forested mountain ridges in the interior of Maine is documented as being a poor wind resource by the US Department of Energy.

    Why destroy what makes Maine world famous for the sake of a few greedy wind developers and corrupt politicians???

    • Anonymous

      well for one when you shower,type on your computer or anything you do,your part of the problem this country has of consumption. I have been a diesel machanic for more then 27 years and the changes in this industy as far as consumption and emmissions go have been for the better. I understand your point of view about wind energy,perhaps you should visit cadillic mountain and see the photos they have of a clear day and a smoggy day. We have very little choice of what new resources to tap into to feed our demands. So if you leave on the light for your hunny to get home or for your self remember  we have to burn some sort of fuel or split atoms.For one it reminds me of one time as a kid we were trapping for beaver and a couple stopped and asked what we were doing,after we explained what we were doing they were appauled to think we were killing animals for fur,she never thought of where the fur for the coat she was wearing came from. There is no please people like you,no smog,forget splitting atoms,no smokeing and you want a hot shower and a bright light to stand under,WTF

      • hasacluemaine

        Put it on Cadillac….hmmm, go beavers.

        • Anonymous

          excatly anywhere you want my back yard is fine,facts is the truth is upon us and some dont like seeing thier own carbon footprint now do we ?someone has come up with a great idea and theres always some one to complain,voice ideas not negitive ones so we can all move forward,ideas is what made this country,not a bunch of complaining hypocrites enjoying the ride like they hate ,give me a break. its just like plum creek people just cant stand to see change its happening and you better get use to it.

  • Anonymous

    I hope the Oakfield and Island Falls area doesn’t lose it’s rural appeal.  I, for one, don’t want to look at FIFTY of those things.

  • Great news ! Now all we need to do is rid our State of it’s draconian Republican Governor and we too can join the rest of the world in the race for renewable energy.

    • Anonymous

      If you count hydropower, Maine already has the highest % of it’s power portfolio from renewables that any other state in the nation.  Why don’t you try doing  just a little research or reading on the issue before you post here and make yourself look like a baffoon.

  • Penny Gray

    Wind “parks”.  Wind “farms”.  Such interesting terminology for an industry that’s so environmentally destructive, and such an interesting strategy, targeting these rural areas far, far from urban energy burners like Portland, where the residents voted in an ordinance to keep these monstrous things from destroying their city skyline.  Does anyone know the status of Trans Canada’s Kibby project?  Are all the turbines off line or only some?  I’d heard the transmissions in the nacelles were burning out due to the unpredictable gusts of mountain wind.  Does this mean the Canadians are living in darkness?

  • Anonymous

    The articles indicates that each turbine will have a capacity of 3.0 mw with a total height of 459 ft which makes it twice the capacity of turbines at Mars Hill and Stetson Mountain.  Historically, an economy of scale has been gained by making longer blades; however, greater uncertainty exists with longer blades due to stress limits imposed by creep, fatigue, and relaxation mechanisms.  Longer blades for on-land turbines have posed problems in transporting the units to the site which partially explains the interest in off-shore wind.  This site must have unique characteristics to allow the transport of longer blades.  Visually, a 3 mw turbine imposes greater impacts on aesthetic values than the Mars Hill units.  Energy from a wind turbine is directly proportional to cross-sectional area and to wind velocity cubed.  This site must have an excellent profile to justify an investment during difficult economic times.  This project might also represent the limit of technological innovations (i.e., longer blades) to warrant an investment while testing aesthetic patience.

    • Anonymous

      This site has no unique qualities for wind, as it is in the same general area as First Wind’s Stetson and Rollins projects, neither of which get even 25% capacity factor.  The NREL is correct in classifying this region of Maine as “poor” to “marginal” potential for wind power.  Wind power is just a scam and there is a huge push on to get as much in the pipeline as possible with the hope that the PTC gets extended or, if it ended, anything that is permitted before the expiration at the end of the year will still qualify for the wind pigs to feast at the tax subsidy trough. 

      Meanwhile, in Maine, we have spent public funds on preserving Nicatous Lake, just east of Passadumkeag Mt.  See this link and its description:  “The centerpiece of this property is 5,100-acre Nicatous Lake, widely considered to be one of Maine’s most beautiful water bodies with its pristine sand beaches, intricate coves and 98 islands.”  Link:  http://www9.informe.org/lmf/projects/project_detail.php?project=1559

      It is time to stop this madness of sacrificing what makes Maine so special to an industry that shouldn’t even exist because it is based on bad economics, supported by bad public policy.

  • Anonymous

    Good – keep ’em coming.

    Yessah

  • I would suggest they vote in a wind ordinance ASAP and keep the lying wind companies out- besides being ineffective these are horrible areas for wind and repeatedly no one has addressed this- human and wildlife near these things are forced to move or have serious health impact also contrary to what the wind companies claim and more and more evidence is coming up on the bats ( already endangered by white nose disease) and birds that are massacred in numbers, It is estimated the gold eagle will soon be extinct thanks to wind turbines and if they continue to happen here in Maine we can expect to do the same to our bald eagles..not to mention many other species of birds. Obama keeps talking jobs jobs but the jobs are not that many when locals can no longer run their businesses after the construction crews go- it is all claims that are sadly untrue and who will clean up the mess after they have ruined our land, killed and displaced our animals and the waste from the old turbines still stands?
    Plus these are made in China or Europe so where is the carbon imprint and if you search wind turbines and toxic waste you will find plenty? How green is the total sum of the parts pray tell? Come ON Maine get informed..a little $ under you nose from a company with a bunch of financial debt will do nothing in the long run for your children or generations to come. Yes, as aviation sensation said- do the research! I know this reporter told me that the wind people are just overly sensitive, but I think the wind and politicians supporting wind are uncaring and denying us our rights- and if the reporter would do his homework he might agree with us instead of dismissing us.

  • Anonymous

    the money would be better spent on bio mass. retrofit the existing paper mills like there doing at the old Berlin,New Hampshire paper mill.

  • Anonymous

    Truth : if this wasnt a scam to fund private developers with tax payer dollars
    and we had a sensible energy policy we would be putting solar panels on many roof tops in the state.
    The panel technology is really starting to produce great , reasonably priced systems
    that can power each home individually.
    No corrupt” grid system” to bother with.
    And No Moving Parts and no clear cutting of our mountains.
    Stationary , silent , tailored for each house.
    Local contractors from our own hometowns doing the work.
    Wow , continuous clean power and more local folks back to work.
    I like it.

  • $ 56.23 federal dollars per kilowatt hour, doesn’t make sense to me. The subsidy is not getting passed at the federal level, two attempts have been made to tag it on to something else, and now there are investigations going on across America dealing with closed market foolery, ethic laws being broken and unfair practices with the public, I would think that people would protect themselves from this scam. 
    These projects prey on  the vulnerable communities, contracts, leases are made, yet, there is no way to enforce them. Roxbury residents are still waiting for their “FREE ELECTRICITY” with the wind project in production. Woodstock won’t be getting any electricity, but the camps of Concord Pond never had electricity. Those people have lost their quiet world and hide away to the sound of industrial wind turbines, 10 of them. The developer said ” they don’t make noise loud enough for you to here them”. I was against the project because I know that wind turbines do make noise. I am 1. 2 miles from the project and have recorded the sound levels at night from48 dba to 55 dba.  I would like to suggest that the residents of Farmington realize that there are lawsuits in this state and other states that are battling the false promises of the wind companies. This is happening because people did not realize that these Huge Machines on top of mountains do make noise and echo, which compounds the noise even higher.
         These projects should be at least 2 to 2.5 miles away from homes, this will eliminate the DB c sound that effects our bodies. It is a sound that is not heard, yet, it is felt. Sound has been used in warfare against the enemies, this DB c sound interferes with doppler radar, it is also a sound that causes vibration, which is the bases for wild animals to protect themselves. Wind turbines in my mind need more study and less federal subsidy. If you want to know more, contact me at treesaver51@yahoo.com

  • Guest

    I encourage every Maine voter to contact Senators Collins and Snowe, to vote against the energy Production Tax credit, which has slyly been attached to a transportation bill. This tax credit is the life blood to the wind industry, whose energy production cannot stand on its own in the real world of economics. When one talks about corporate welfare, they are talking about the wind and solar industry. Think Solyndra!

  • Guest

    The Maine Senate race and Presidential race will turn on the wind turbine. We are aware and will stop the destruction of Maine’s beauty by those who feed at the government’s trough. This is an issue that unites liberals, conservatives and moderates. Only the ultra left hang on to this fantasy not rooted in real economics.

  • It will have a horrible scenic impact with flashing red lights at night..704 people signed our petition about our two historic lakes that are highly ranked by the State of Maine and yet the DEP did not listen to the comments on the petition or the letters sent in addition..they granted the permit..our lakes are historic and partially preserved and the State does not care..it is for the citizens to become better informed. these things are not pretty and destroy people’s quality of life..again do the research..it is not renewable and it is not green and the wind companies are VERY sneaky.,,and as has been sited it is all about greed and $ , no benefit to Maine people who enjoy their life..their lives are ruined forever, ask those in Vinylhaven and mars hill who are suing and having to move.

  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous

    We knew this was coming, it was on FirstWinds’ map at the Lincoln wind promo. It may be coincidence or it may be a shell game of some sort. Big wind has every ridge and mtn. in Maine targeted, whatever they choose to call themselves. If each project has a different backer, the developers think it sounds better for them. Mainers are wise to the windsprawllers’ games. Maine does not need this area ruined with wind litter. The canoe trips down the Pas. River are remote and have a good wilderness feel. That would be lost with the unwelcome intrusion of windsprawl. Leave ME alone.

    • Anonymous

      It is funny that the state will allow these wind companies to destroy the tops of mountains, yet Plume creek has been trying to develop an area near Greenville which would be less detrimental than a wind farm and it is met with steep opposition. Maybe Plume Creek needs to add wind mills to their site.

  • Anonymous

    Wind isn’t ALL bad.  But the siting of the turbine groups should be carefully considered. 

  • Anonymous

    I hear so much crap about the wind industry in these comments.  It is energy for the taking.  Some have called the gulf of Maine the Saudi Arabia of wind energy.  All we have to do is invest and show some forethought.   This could be a REAL industry in Maine.   Being a “Green business” is big business these days and if we can sell it to the grid lets do it.   Forestry is nothing that it once was, shipbuilding is long gone, tourism is a joke, and agriculture is not profitable on the scale we need another option.   Wind energy is not oil and to compare it as such will not work. Maine is already the greenest energy consumer in the U.S.  thanks to cheap Canadian hydro power so green energy is already a viable option. Who cares about birds? How many birds die from hitting windows?    Smarten up people we need new industry.

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