Comments for: Study: Cellphone ban had big impact on traffic deaths in California

Posted March 05, 2012, at 9:17 p.m.

SAN JOSE, Calif. — California drivers squawked, they talked, and one or two even balked at having cellphones ripped from their hands when the state law forbidding the use of hand-held phones on the road went into effect in 2008. But according to a study announced Monday by the state …

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  • Anonymous

    Yes–enforcement, even more than big fines, will save lives.
    Of course we cannot have Maine law enforcement officers pulling each other over to stop them talking on the phones!  Seems at least half of all local police, sheriff’s deputies, and state troopers I see driving around are using a phone.

    Is this part of the departments doing?  Are communications to and from patrol cars now conducted on cell phones?  What happened to radios?  Or are these calls possibly not department business?

    Hang up and then enforce the weak “distracted driving” law we do have. 

    Let’s get some stats on how many lives we can save….

  • Anonymous

    Could be related to the facts that unemployment and gas prices are higher in CA: both lead to fewer people on the roads.

  • Anonymous

    What? Less people die when people keep their eyes on the road, instead of their cell phones? Whoda thunk it? lol.

  • Anonymous

    With 3076 traffic deaths last year in California, a reduction of 40 deaths per year is a 1.3% decrease.  Not exactly a “big impact,” and one that could easily have been produced by other factors; for instance, people driving less, or slower, because of high gas prices.

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