November 16, 2018
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Comments for: 100 show up for Ayla Reynolds vigil despite poor weather

  • Anonymous

    It’s about time to make some arrests on this case.

    • Anonymous

      I wish that would happen soon too… but they’ve got to have sufficient evidence if someone is going to be charged with a crime such as “murder” If they arrest someone and don’t have sufficient evidence and a murderer is found not guilty because of lack of evidence they can never be tried again due to double jeopardy — not even if he the accused  goes on national tv and admits to committing the crime.  

      It’s got to be very frustrating for law enforcement too not to be able to charge someone because they just don’t have sufficient evidence to prove the crime.   I have no doubt they want to solve this crime but they absolutely must have all their ducks in a row, if not… remember Caylee Anthony?  

      Murderers walk free if there is not enough evidence and justice can never be served.  But sometimes that is not even enough – in the case of little Caylee Anthony I think they had enough evidence but for whatever reason that jury expected more.  As a result her murderer can never be tried and will never pay for this crime.  I think most of us who followed the evidence concluded that no one else but Casey Anthony could be connected to every single piece of evidence. The evidence mounted so high that we all thought it was impossible for Casey Anthony not to be found guilty of something more than lying to police (which she has now challenged and it is pending a court date to determine whether she did or did not lie to the police about things like working at Universal Studio, about leaving the baby with Zaneida Gonzolez, etc… 

      So, police and prosecutors know that they can’t charge someone with a crime like murder if they don’t have all the evidence. I think there is little doubt that they believe the crime against Ayla is murder and so, they can’t make an arrest until they are at least 90% sure they’ve got the evidence to prove it.  Otherwise a murderer will walk free forever and can never be charged for the crime again no matter what else happens – just like Casey Anthony. 

      • Anonymous

         That plus the fact that Casey Anthony had the dumbest jury in the world (OJ Simpson’s jury comes in a close second).

        • Anonymous

          THAT’s for sure… I was trying to be kind and not call the Anthony jury stupid but I guess when the shoe fits…  You’re also right about OJ Simpson too.  In that case I don’t think they dumb as much as I think they were star-struck – which, come to think of it is a pretty darn dumb manner of “justice” at a murder trial. Sad, isn’t it?  I seriously think they need jurors to take a jury duty class and pass a jury duty test before they can serve.  It was obvious in the Anthony case that this jury didn’t even understand the basics… you know, the difference between “any” doubt and “unreasonable” doubt.  If the jury doesn’t understand that basic difference then no one could ever be found guilty of any crime when it’s a trial by jury. 

      • Anonymous

         I believe Casey killed her daughter but people I know in law enforcement said there wasn’t enough evidence.  For ex., no one testified that saw her do it. this case is even more difficult in that there is no body.

        • Anonymous

          Very few murders ever have an eye witness and some murders are successfully prosecuted without an eyewitness and without a body. Most murderers in prison today were not convicted because of an eye witness to the murder. Murder, like rape, arson, etc… are crimes that are committed in the absence of other people. They are not public crimes with witnesses and most convicted murderers who are in prison today were convicted on circumstantial evidence.

          There was plenty of circumstantial evidence in the Caylee Anthony case to convict her of murder and to easily rule out ANY “reasonable” doubt as to who was responsible for the death of Caylee Anthony.  There was plenty of evidence to show that this was not an accident.  

          From what you just said you would have found Casey Anthony innocent just like the Florida jurors. They, like you, wanted an eye witness or a video tape or some ridiculous thing that almost never exists in any trial for any crime. Murders are not crimes that are typically witnessed. Murders, particularly when a parent kills their own child, is committed with no one present.

          You may want to rethink what you’re saying.  You are saying that you could not find a parent or any person guilty of killing a child without a witness to the murder.  Seriously? That’s what you need to convict?  Think about that for a minute. Absorb it. You said you would need an eye witness to the murder of a baby in order to convict the killer, right?  OMG… what kind of a coward would stand there and simply watch the murder of a baby without stepping in an stopping it?  Anyone who witnesses the murder of a baby and does nothing to stop it and does not report it should be charged with accessory to murder. This would not be considered a reliable witness and their testimony would be useless.

          You can convict on circumstantial evidence with or without a body. In the Anythony case they had the body and a great deal of evidence all pointing to Casey Anthony as the murderer. There was no reasonable doubt to think otherwise. None!!! In Ayla’s case they don’t have a body and they haven’t charged anyone because they are not ready to take this to trial. They may never be… or they may charge someone 10 years from now. Murder has no statute of limitations but if they go to trial and the killer is found innocent that’s it… the killer could go on national tv and admit to the crime and could not be tried again. Double jeopardy.

  • Anonymous

    LOVE TO AYLA!!!    I wish a conclusion to your journey sweetheart,  you are very special to all of us!                                    Keep the faith.    And mom, …don’t ever stop asking questions, and what’s going on!

    • Anonymous

      Very well said!! I too pray for you Ayla!! I agree that mom should never give up too, don’t back down!!

    • Anonymous

      I’m totally with you on this… I hope people have not discouraged this mother.  I saw too many people posting ugly comments every time this mother was in the media talking about Ayla. They all just wanted her to go away.   Well, when she and her family go away so does the memory of Ayla because the father, his friends and family want nothing more than for this to just go away.   This baby deserves more and I applaud the mother for sticking with it even when ignorant people were making ugly accusations.  I can’t even imagine how difficult and frightening it is to see the public lose interest in finding the baby or what happened to Ayla.

  • Anonymous

    Ridiculous no arrests have been made.What is holding the police back on this? make them talk.there must be a way.someone is wasting a lot of taxpayers dollars and everyones time when someone KNOWS!

    • Anonymous

       The father and his relatives know what happened but apparently agreed to a pact of silence, lies and deception. I would like to think people who know these individuals would have nothing to do with them.  You can bet the police are still working overtime, and the truth will emerge, but now the stonewalling people who were in the house that night have circled the wagons.

    • Anonymous

       the local cops are not allowed to “waterboard” suspects,etc. The cops have rules they have to go by. They must be as frustrated as the rest of us.

  • today truly showed that ayla has an “army of angels”….thank u everyone who came and for everyone who showed ur support from far away..god bless u all <3  justice for ayla!

  • today truly showed that ayla has an “army of angels”….thank u everyone who came and for everyone who showed ur support from far away..god bless u all <3  justice for ayla!

  • Guest

     Jerry Perdomo disappearance took about a week to solve.  A toddler girl
    goes missing from a house full of drug using adults – still working on
    it… AMAZING.

    • PaulNotBunyan

      I’m sure they will get it done. This is different from the Perdomo case. They worked that fast because they got the leads they needed. They don’t have leads like a rental car and cell phone logs that are leading them to Ayla. They have some people trying to stonewall them but I don’t think they can stick together and hold up much longer.

      • Anonymous

        The ‘stonewall’ seems to come from people who were at the home the night this girl disappeared, each of them telling a different story to such a degree that the Police publicly announce that the stories don’t add up and nobody is in jail?  Let’s start by putting these ‘stone-wallers’ in cells (with stonewalls) and go from there.

        • PaulNotBunyan

           I agree with the concept entirely. I suspect they need something else to legally carry it out. I keep hoping they will get the break they need in this case.

        • Anonymous

           I believe if legally this could be done, the Police would have done so already.

          • Anonymous

            Then it sounds like they have you right where they want you. I think, if after three months they still don’t have anything, that we need to hire more competent police. Really.

  • Too, too sad. I hope that some day that the is an “Ayla’sLaw” that makes a caregiver(some caregiver Justin was!!!!) libel for a felony for not getting medical attention ASAP and followups for an injured child. On my mind that we don’t know the span of time between Ayla’s broken arm and when she was seen by a doctor. I know that a break starts to heal immediately in a right or wrong way. That is why sometimes it needs to be set. Take it from a girl who broke her arm twice before the age of 5.

    • Anonymous

      What’s actually ‘sad’ about this story is that these folks evidently had serious problems, that they were known to the State (who should have been watching out for this child but obviously were not) and that everyone seems to have failed this child in one way or another.  Except that I’m not convinced that ‘sad’ is really the word. It might be more like ‘alarming’ or ‘discouraging’ or ‘aggravating’, or perhaps, ‘infuriating’.

      • Anonymous

         what was the State to do when the child was with her dad?

        • Anonymous

          Have you spent any time reading (if you can) about this case? This family was well known to DHHS.

    • Anonymous

      The state dropped the ball on this one, one parent in rehab, and the other doesn’t seem much better. The child should have been in state custody. I wonder if the other child is still in the home, and if the rehab parent is in a random drug testing program.

      • Anonymous

        I cannot begin to say how corrupt DHHS was to place this poor baby in the care of drug addicted alcoholic. They need to be held accountable NOW. What DHHS did to this poor child by placing her in a dangerous home is reprehensible!!!!

    • Anonymous

       Let’s hope someday all children are born to 2 mature adults in a marriage who are capable and willing to take care of a child properly and provide for all their needs, financially, emotionally, physically, spiritually, mentally.

  • People are making the wrong comparisons between this case and the Perdomo case. The real comparison should come from the recent article in which Perdomo’s murderer is being backed by family and friends who will not admit that someone they loved made a horrible, senseless, stupid choice, regardless of the circumstances of his life. We know that something happened in Ayla’s home, and we know based on the silence of others that they are condoning it.

    I look at pictures of Ayla and here is what I don’t understand… how can all of Maine and beyond care what happened to her but the people responsible for her passed her around and now stay silent behind closed doors, or silent at vigils, knowing that they could do something and that they have never done enough and just letting it be?

    I love my kids to death, I would do anything for them, but if they ever murdered someone, they need to be held responsible for it. ESPECIALLY if that murdered person is my GRANDCHILD. This is the same sick thing that happened with Casey Anthony. These parents enable their kids until they have made a murderer out of them and then they CONTINUE to encourage it by lying for them and believing things that are beyond reason.

    I would have a lot of respect for a person who could come forward and admit that their child made a mistake. But I have zero respect for an overprotective, lying scum of a mother who knows that a defenseless child was murdered at the hands of her child and just continues on with life. It’s sick and pathetic. And I hope the person in question reads this and thinks of what message she is sending her son by living his lie.

  • Briney

    Mommy and daddy were conspicuous by their absence.

  • Anonymous

    I have two question:

    Why can’t LE charge the DHHS with incompetency (mildly put) that
    has resulted in the loss of the child?

    Why can’t LE charge those
    individuals within DHHS who made the decision to place Ayla in that dangerous home
    pay for their huge mistake?

    And do it now. We need some justice
    and let them begin with DHHS!

    • Why_Whynot

      I’d like to think that 1- LE is putting ALL their focus on building the case against the DIPS, and that is also why they have not charged anyone with neglect or child endangerment.  2- It’s not a topic of why DHHS put Ayla with her father, they could not stop that, the question is why they did not open a case or follow up when Ayla’s mom suggested that Ayla has a lot of accidents while with her dad.
      I agree that DHHS has dropped the ball, maybe if they were checking on Ayla none of this would have happened.  I also think that after LE is done with the DIPS there will be an investigation into DHHS and the people that should have been there for Ayla!

  • Police should put the people that were with Ayla the night she went missing until they tell the whole story of what happened that night.  This is unreal that family and friends can’t be honest.  

  • PaulNotBunyan

    Instead of criticizing law enforcement people should be thinking “What can I do to help?”.  If you live in that area maybe you can put things like “Where is Ayla?” on your car. Keep some people reminded that we want answers.

  • Anonymous

    Two points, 3 actually. DHHS i am sure continues to be overloaded. People scream for shrinking government and cutting back, this is what you get. Want child protection? Insist that this department be expanded and be willing to allow tax dollars to pay for it. A fair and more proportionate tax system as things like child safety and our infrastructure is everyone’s responsibility, including those fortunate enough to have income in the high 6 figures and above who would rather working people bear the brunt. Another point: As poited out, you don’t throw people in jail based on hunches or so called common sense (meaning conclusions jumped to based on what is gleaned by rumor, innuendo and what comes through the media). And jurors are not any more “stupid” than the rest of us. In fact they are us, hence a jury of our peers, not a jury of experts. There is wisdom in the idea that regular folks will use our “common sense” to weigh whatever evidence is presented and make a fair decision. It is not foolproof but we have decided that it gives people a chance for a fair trial. 
    A third point. When this baby first went missing, I was stunned that, and forgive me if it actually did occur and was not reported, bloodhounds and or other search dogs were not immediately brought to the scene before the trail went cold. I asked a police friend “WTF is going on? A helpless toddler is lost, endangered under the best of circumstances. Were the police called immediately? Was an organized search party formed immediately and again, scenthounds given an article of clothing could have picked up on a trail, I was astounded by what seemed to be a very slow, and again, i apologize, only going by what i read in the paper, apathetic response. The kid could have developed hypothermia, fallen into the wrong hands even from the right family, become injured or as in this case, hopelessly lost. 
    The Florida firefighter’s colleagues reportedly were headed right up to Maine to search on their own, i thought, good idea. I do know that had this search taken a wait and see attitude, the new rug and fan set up to dry it may not have gone noticed after a while. Trails should not be ignored till they chill. It is good Perdomo had close friends and family advocating for him. Too bad little Ayla’s family did not not immediately demand police come find her when they realized she was gone, it certainly is suspicious behavior. That is why we need strong agencies made up of well trained and competent people empowered to protect the helpless who are in danger, and why any missing or lost child deserves the best and most modern search methods, and a scenthound immediately on the trail. 

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