Comments for: Afghanistan exit

Posted March 02, 2012, at 6:01 p.m.

The latest crisis in Afghanistan strikes at the heart of the U.S. strategy for preventing the country from reverting to Taliban rule or becoming a base for al-Qaida. If those goals are to be achieved, the Afghan security forces that have been recruited, trained and equipped at enormous cost over …

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  • Anonymous

    Since this is a Washington Post story, maybe they can answer my questions.
    First of all there was a stupid mistake that should never have happened. Which should land on the shoulders of those in command for not insuring that things like this happen.
    Then there was the stupid decision by someone in the press, who felt they were duty bound to publicize the mistaken burning to the world. Were they that naive that they didn’t think rioting and deaths would be the result of this news being brought to light? Was the fate of the world lying in the balance if the burning wasn’t publicized? How many deaths are enough to justify the news media for publicizing these book burnings? Will the same reporters cover the funerals of the soldiers murdered?

    • Anonymous

      Perhaps if the U.S. military had not occupied the country for more than a decade, imprisoned it’s citizens for years at Bagram without charges, repeatedly killed innocent Afghans in checkpoint shootings, and children in air strikes, we wouldn’t be so naive to think that rioting and deaths would be the result.

      • Anonymous

        no worries. patomo1 will figure it out when he (or one of his kids) gets the same in return someday.  the sad part is our moronic countrymen think our ‘enemy’ has a short memory.  they are sorely mistaken… 

        • Anonymous

          History has a faily long memory. History teaches us that that part of the world only understands one thing. Total out and out, no prisoners taken warfare. We haven’t had the will to do that kind of warfare since Korea.

          I hope and pray that you or one of your loved ones doesn’t get the same in return. Maybe you should joing the Phelps Cult in Kansas. They are probably overjoyed that another few service men were killed.

          • Anonymous

            Your history book is wanting.

      • Anonymous

        Personally, I believe that Afghanistan should have been made into a poster child of what happens when you harbor terrorists and allow them to set up training camps in your countyr. Then refuse to turn them over to the world court when they pull a 9/11.
        What we should have done was start carpet bombing the exits out of Afghanistan and work our way inland until they turned Osama bin Ladden over to us or a world court. It would have lasted a very short time. Sent a clear message to the world that we will retaliate in a timely manner, with as much force as we deem neccessary. Unfortunately that didn’t happen and we are dealing with the mess as it stands and I for one would pull our troops out of that god forsaken part of the world immediately if not sooner. Because we are wasting our time there. Those people have no intentions of ever joining the 20th century, let alone the 21st.

        That being said, the situation is what it is. All I’m asking is for some common sense somewhere in this moronic world we seem to be living in.

        • Anonymous

          You equate the whole Afghan population with the Taliban leaders that harbored OBL with your statments advocating indiscriminate carpet bombing of “those poeple”. This makes my point that what drives the Afghan rioting is not only the burning of the koran, but policies that through fear or ignorance lump all Afghans together into a Taliban other to be killed or ignored.
          The situation is what we have made it. 

          • Anonymous

            If the Afghan people wish to harbor terrorist organizations and give them a safe haven, they should be willing to suffer the consequences of their actions. If we had reacted with total all out war and unleashed the power that we have, I feel that our casualties and theirs would have been much less than they are now. They would have learned an important lesson. They would also be a poster child to any other country that wishes to harbor terrorists that have no agenda other than terror for terrors sake. In an insane world you can’t reason with those who use their insanity to attack others. There is no reason when dealing with these people.

            In the mean time we still have our children serving their country in Afghanistan. There is nothing you or I can do about that except that I will pray they all make it home alive and well. You can root for the other side if you wish.

          • Anonymous

            Again with the monolithic “Afghan people”. 

            Your call for total war would seem to entail something more than the bombing, drone strikes, and attacks that have already taken place in Operations like Anaconda, Medusa, Achilles, etc…
            What exactly would that have been?
             
            Pointing out the failures of the Afghan war is not rooting for the other side.
            Ignoring the killing of civilians and demanding that everyone look the other way when dumb soldiers burn a Koran does more harm to the troops who are trying to do the right thing over there.

            What’s the god you pray to that’s such a big advocate of “total war”?  I don’t recall J.C. as a big fan of the carpet bombing, but maybe you have a different edition. Feel free to quote me new testament chapter and verse on the righteousness of the preemptive strike. 

          • Anonymous

            I am not ignoring the killing of civilians. I am pointing out that if this had been dealt with in the manner I sugest that it would have been over a long time ago and the killing would have stopped.  I would love to see all of our troops out of that country. There is nothing we can do that is going to change these people. I know the word people upsets you, but I don’t know their names individually, just like neith I nor you know the names of the victims in the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, or those who died in Pennsylvania. So for the time being I will refer to them as people.

        • Guest

          The war in Afghanistan has absolutely nothing to do with ‘harboring terrorists’.  We’re involved in Afghanistan because some highly placed people in our government want to pocket the enormous profits from controlling 90% of the world’s opium.  

          • Anonymous

            You are absolutely correct. It is what it is. My original question was, is there any sensable reason why the burning of these korans needed to be publicized to the world in general.

          • Guest

            Personally, I like the military not being able to control the news. You must be pleased as punch that the generals could also whitewash the murder of Pat Tillman the way they did.

  • Anonymous

    why keep throwing good money into these people again and again.. bring our boys home and make a new parking lot there… take the oil… share with the other countrys and lets get things affordable to continue on with our lives… and lose a threat that will never go away otherwise and by all means OBOMBA  must go to.. he should stay behind for the parking lot construction in iraq

    • Anonymous

      No doubt you’re genius parking lot extermination and resource seizure policy will endear us to the world, and history.
      As well as increasing our national security, since the whole of humanity can be boiled down to a third grade playground metaphor. Go read a book. 

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